"Pragmatic Architecture", in book form

For a couple of years now, I've been going around the world and giving a talk entitled "Pragmatic Architecture", talking both about what architecture is (and what architects really do), and ending the talk with my own "catalog" of architectural elements and ideas, in an attempt to take some of the mystery and "cloud" nature of architecture out of the discussion. If you've read Effective Enterprise Java, then you've read the first version of that discussion, where Pragmatic Architecture was a second-generation thought process.

Recently, the patterns & practices group at Microsoft went back and refined their Application Architecture Guide, and while there's a lot about it that I wish they'd done differently (less of a Microsoft-centric focus, for one), I think it's a great book for Microsoft-centric architects to pick up and have nearby. In a lot of ways, this is something similar to what I had in mind when I thought about the architectural catalog, though I'll admit that I'd prefer to go one level "deeper" and find more of the "atoms" that make up an architecture.

Nevertheless, I think this is a good PDF to pull down and put somewhere on your reference list.

Notes and caveats: Firstly, this is a book for solution architects; if you're the VP or CTO, don't bother with it, just hand it to somebody further on down the food chain. Secondly, if you're not an architect, this is not the book to pick up to learn how to be one. It's more in the way of a reference guide for existing architects. In fact, my vision is that an architect faced with a new project (that is, a new architecture to create) will think about the problem, sketch out a rough solution in his head, then look at the book to find both potential alternatives (to see if they fit better or worse than the one s/he has in her/his head), and potential consequences (to the one s/he has in her/his head). Thirdly, even if you're a Java or Ruby architect, most of the book is pretty technology-neutral. Just take a black Sharpie to the parts that have the Microsoft trademark around them, and you'll find it a pretty decent reference, too. Fourthly, in the spirit of full disclosure, the p&p guys brought me in for a day of discussion on the Guide, so I can't say that I'm completely unbiased, but I can honestly say that I didn't write any of it, just offered critique (in case that matters to any potential readers).