Factory Method

tl;dr Patterns, 20 Years Later: Factory Method is a pattern that is often called by a simpler name hinging on the word “Factory”, a la “the Factory pattern” or somesuch. The GOF language actually has two patterns which each could qualify under that moniker, this one and the Abstract Factory, depending on the intent and the desired consequences.




Catalog

The overall pattern catalog. The goals of this enterprise are admittedly audacious: to not only re-visit the original Gang-of-Four patterns, bringing them “up to speed” with modern languages and idioms, but also to incorporate concepts from functional (and object/functional hybrid) languages.

Note that these are “design patterns”, meaning they are at the level of software implementation design, not “architectural” patterns (such as what we might find from Martin Fowler’s “Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture”).






Singleton

tl;dr Patterns, 20 Years Later: Let’s start with everybody’s favorite (and most despised) pattern, the Singleton. Everybody loves the Singleton because, conceptually, it seems the easiest of the lot to understand and (in most post-1995 languages) the easiest to implement. But everybody hates it because its singleton-y nature means it is a natural target for concurrency problems up the wazoo. (And then there’s that whole “Singleton instance vs static methods” debate that goes on.)


Reclaiming Design Patterns (20 Years Later)

tl;dr 20 years ago, the “Gang of Four” published the seminal work on design patterns. Written to the languages of its time (C++ and Smalltalk), and written using the design philosophies of the time (stressing inheritance, for example), it nevertheless spawned a huge “movement” within the industry. Which, as history has shown us, was already the hallmark of its doom—anything that has ever become a “movement” within this industry eventually disappoints and is burned at the public-relations stake when it fails to deliver on the overhyped promises that it never actually made. It’s time to go back, re-examine the 23 patterns (and, possibly, a few variants) with a fresh set of eyes, match them up against languages which have had 20 years to mature, and see what emerges. (Spoiler alert: all of the original 23 hold up pretty well, and there’s a lot of nuance that I think we missed the first time around.)