"From each, according to its abilities...."

Recently, NFJS alum and buddy Dion Almaer questioned the widespread, almost default, usage of a relational database for all things storage related: Ian Hickson: “I expect I’ll be reverse-engineering SQLite and speccing that, if nothing better is picked first. As it is, people are starting to use the database feature in actual Web apps (e.g. mobile GMail, iirc).” When I read that comment to Vlad’s post on HTML 5 Web Storage I gulped.

Out, out, you damn foreigners!

A friend of mine, from Canada, recently decided not to come to the US anymore. Today was my final time trying to enter the US to do what many other people have done in my industry before: go and speak at a conference. The reason I was given this time was that although I had forfeit the speaking fee they were going to pay me, I was still going to be speaking at a conference where other speakers were getting paid, and that there was no reason an American couldn’t fill that spot.

"Multi-core Mania": A Rebuttal

The Simple-Talk newsletter is a monthly e-zine that the folks over at Red Gate Software (makers of some pretty cool toys, including their ANTS Profiler, and recent inheritors of the Reflector utility legacy) produce, usually to good effect. But this month carried with it an interesting editorial piece, which I reproduce in its entirety here: When the market is slack, nothing succeeds better at tightening it up than promoting serial group-panic within the community.

Laziness in Scala

While playing around with a recent research-oriented project for myself (more on that later), I discovered something that I haven't seen mentioned anywhere in the Scala universe before. (OK, not really--as you'll see towards the end of this piece, it really is documented, but allow me my brief delusions of grandeur as I write this. They'll get deflated quickly enough.) So the core of the thing was a stack-oriented execution engine; essentially I'm processing commands delivered in a postfix manner.

A new stack: JOSH

An interesting blog post was forwarded to me by another of my fellow ThoughtWorkers, which suggests a new software stack for building an enterprise system, acronymized as “JOSH”: The Book Of JOSH Through a marvelous, even devious, set of circumstances, I'm presented with the opportunity to address my little problem without proscribed constraints, a true green field opportunity. Json OSGi Scala HTTP Json delivers on what XML promised. Simple to understand, effective data markup accessible and usable by human and computer alike.

From the Mailbag: Polyglot Programmer vs. Polyactivist Language

This crossed my Inbox: I read your article entitled: The Polyglot Programmer. How about the thought that rather than becoming a polyglot-software engineer; pick a polyglot-language. For example, C# is borrowing techniques from functional and dynamic languages. Let the compiler designer worry about mixing features and software engineers worry about keep up with the mixture. Is this a good approach? [From Phil, at http://greensoftwareengineer.spaces.live.com/] Phil, it’s an interesting thought you’ve raised—which is the better/easier approach to take, that of incorporating the language features we want into a single language, rather than needing to learn all those different languages (and their own unique syntaxes) in order to take advantage of those features we want?

SDWest, SDBestPractices, SDArch&Design: RIP, 1975 - 2009

This email crossed my Inbox last week while I was on the road: Due to the current economic situation, TechWeb has made the difficult decision to discontinue the Software Development events, including SD West, SD Best Practices and Architecture & Design World. We are grateful for your support during SD's twenty-four year history and are disappointed to see the events end. This really bums me out, because the SD shows were some of the best shows I’ve been to, particularly SD West, which always had a great cross-cutting collection of experts from all across the industry’s big technical areas: C++, Java, .NET, security, agile, and more.

As for Peer Review, Code Review?

Interesting little tidbit crossed my Inbox today... Only 8% members of the Scientific Research Society agreed that "peer review works well as it is". (Chubin and Hackett, 1990; p.192). "A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision and an analysis of the peer review system substantiate complaints about this fundamental aspect of scientific research." (Horrobin, 2001) Horrobin concludes that peer review "is a non-validated charade whose processes generate results little better than does chance."

Woo-hoo! Speaking at DSL DevCon 2009!

Just got this email from Chris Sells: For twelve 45-minute slots at this year’s DSL DevCon (April 16-17 in Redmond, WA), we had 49 proposals. You have been selected as speakers for the following talks. Please confirm that you’ll be there for both days so that I can put together the schedule and post it on the conference site. This DevCon should rock. Thanks! Martin Fowler - Keynote Paul Vick + Gio - Mgrammar Deep Dive Tom Rodgers - Domain Specific Languages for automated testing of equity order management systems and trading machines Paul Cowan - DSLs in the Horn Package Manager Guillaume Laforge - How to implement DSLs with Groovy Markus Voelter - Eclipse tooling for Model-Driven stuff Dionysios G.