Review: "Programming Clojure", by Stu Halloway

(Disclaimer: In the spirit of full disclosure, Stu is a friend, fellow NFJS speaker, and former co-worker of mine from DevelopMentor.) I present this review to you in two parts. Short version: If you want to learn Clojure, and you’re familiar with at least one programming language, you’ll find this a great resource. If you don’t already know a programming language, or if you already know Clojure, or if you’re looking for "best practices" to cut-and-paste, you’re going to be disappointed.


The "controversy" continues

Apparently the Rails community isn't the only one pursuing that ephemeral goal of "edginess"—another blatantly sexist presentation came off without a hitch, this time at a Flash conference, and if anything, it was worse than the Rails/CouchDB presentation. I excerpt a few choice tidbits from an eyewitness here, but be warned—if you're not comfortable with language, skip the next block paragraph. Yesterday's afternoon keynote is this guy named Hoss Gifford — I believe his major claim to fame is that viral "spank the monkey" thing that went around a few years back.  Highlights of his talk: He opens his keynote with one of those "Ignite"-esque presentations — where you have 5-minutes and 20 slides to tell a story — and the first and last are a close-up of a woman's lower half, her legs spread (wearing stilettos, of course) and her shaved vagina visible through some see-thru panties that say "drink me," with Hoss's Photoshopped, upward-looking face placed below it.

A eulogy: DevelopMentor, RIP

Update: See below, but I wanted to include the text Mike Abercrombie (DM’s owner) posted as a comment to this post, in the body of the blog post itself. "Ted - All of us at DevelopMentor greatly appreciate your admiration. We’re also grateful for your contributions to DevelopMentor when you were part of our staff. However, all of us that work here, especially our technical staff that write and delivery our courses today, would appreciate it if you would check your sources before writing our eulogy.

SSCLI 2.0 Internals

Joel's weblog appears to be down, so in response to some emails I've posted my draft copy of SSCLI 2.0 Internals here. I think it's the same PDF that Joel had on his weblog, but I haven't made absolutely certain of the fact. :-/ If you've not checked out the first version of SSCLI Internals, it's cool—the second edition is basically everything that the first edition is, plus a new chapter on Generics (and how they changed the internals of the CLR to reflect generics all the way through the system), so you're good.

He was Aaron Erickson... Now he's Aaron Erickson, ThoughtWorker

Yep, you heard that right—Aaron Erickson, author of The Nomadic Developer, is now a ThoughtWorker. For those of who you don't know Aaron, he's been a consultant at another consulting company for a while, and has been exploring a number of different topics in the .NET space for a few years now, not least of which is one of my favorites (F#) and one of THoughtWorks' favorites (agile). He's been speaking at a number of events, including the Connections conferences, and he's going to bring some serious market-development potential to our Chicago office, something that's obviously of concern right now in these current economic conditions.

Of Tomcat 6, native services, Windows 2008R2, and pain...

So I'm putting together a Windows 2008 R2 x64 RC Java image for a client (more on that later), and everything's breezing along fine. Install the OS, check. Install JDK 1.6 (u13) into the machine, check. Install Tomcat 6 into the machine, running as a native Windows service, check. Open localhost on port 8080, and... not check. Times out, no response, not good. Naturally, the first thing to check is the logs, and I get the strangest error I've seen in a while.

TechEd 2009 Thoughts

These are the things I think as I wing my way out of LA fresh from this year's TechEd 2009 conference: I think I owe the attendees at DTL309 ("Busy .NET Developer's Guide to F#") an explanation. It's always embarrassing when your brain freezes during a presentation, and that's precisely what happened during the F# talk—I completely spaced on the syntax for implementing an interface on a class in F#. (To the attendees who commented "consider preparing a bit better so you dont forget the sintax :)" and "Not remembering the language syntax sorta comes across bad doesn't it?", you're absolutely right, which prompts this next sentence.) I apologize profusely to those who were there—I just blew it.

Windows 7 RC install experience

Since a number of people have been connecting to my blog via my last post on installing Windows 7 into a VMWare image, I thought since the Windows7 RC is now available, I'd update my experiences with installing it. I downloaded the Windows7 RC ISO image (a freakishly hideous name containing every character on my US keyboard, plus a few in Klingon, I think.... if you can stand it, the full name of the ISO is 7100.0.090421-1700_x86fre_client_en-us_Retail_Ultimate-GRC1CULFRER_EN_DVD) from the Microsoft CONNECT website, not bothering with any of the other images (x64, ia64, and a "server" image I've not explored yet), using Microsoft's File Transfer Manager.

On speaking, trolling, inciting and growing

It's been going around in developer circles now for a few days, this whole controversy about the "Perform like a pr0n star" presentation from the Golden Gate Ruby Conference and the related accusations of misogyny and sexism and overblown accusations and double-standardisms and what-all else, and I've deliberately waited to let opinions in my head settle out before blogging on the whole thing. Sara J Chipps reacts on her blog, and the comments to her comments are also somewhat...