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 Friday, January 03, 2014
Tech Predictions, 2014

Here we go again: the annual review of last year's predictions, and a set of new ones for the new year.

2013 Retrospective

Without further ado, first we examine last year's Gregorian prognostications:

  • THEN:"Big data" and "data analytics" will dominate the enterprise landscape.

    NOW: Yeah, it was a bit of a slam dunk breakaway kind of call, but it clearly counts. Vendors and consulting companies were climbing all over themselves to talk about "big data", and startups basing their existence on gathering, analyzing, displaying and (theoretically) offering insight from "big data" were all the rage in the startup community, such as local startup Predixion (CTO'ed by a buddy of mine). If you live anywhere in the Pacific Northwest, chances are there's a similar kind of startup within spitting distance of you right now. 1-0.

  • THEN:NoSQL buzz will start to diversify.

    NOW: It didn't happen quite as much as I'd expected, but the various vendors are, in fact, starting to use terms other than "NoSQL" to define themselves. In particular, we're seeing database vendors (MongoDB, Neo4J, Cassandra being my principal examples) talking about being a "document database" or a "graph database" instead of being a "NoSQL" database, though they're fairly quick to claim the NoSQL tag when it comes to differentiating against the traditional relational database. Since I said "start" to diversify, I'm going to take the win. 2-0.

  • THEN:Desktops increasingly become niche products.

    NOW: Well, this one is hard to call. Yes, desktop sales have plummeted, but it's hard to see what those remaining sales are being used for. I will point out that the Mac Pro, with it's radically-different internal construction, definitely puts a new spin on the desktop, but I'm not sure that this counts. Since I took the benefit of the doubt on the last one, I'll forgot it on this one. 2-1.

  • THEN:Home servers will start to grow in interest.

    NOW: I wish I had sales numbers to go with some of this stuff, as hard evidence, but the fact that many people are using their console devices (XBox, XBoxOne, PS3, PS4, etc) as media servers means I missed the boat on this one. I think we may still see home servers continue to rise, but the clear trend has been to make the console gaming device into a server, and not purchase servers on their own to serve as media servers. 2-2.

  • THEN:Private cloud is going to start getting hot.

    NOW: Meh. I see certain cloud vendors talking about private cloud, but for the most part the emphasis is still on public cloud. 2-3. Not looking good for the home team.

  • THEN:Oracle will release Java8, and while several Java pundits will decry "it's not the Java I love!", most will actually come to like it.

    NOW: Well, let's start with the fact that Java8 actually didn't ship this year. And even that, what I would have guessed would be a hugely-debated and hotly-contested choice, really went by without much fanfare or complaint, except from some of the usual hard-liner complaint sources. Which means one of two things: either (a) it's finally come to pass that most of the people developing on top of the JVM really don't care about the Java language's growth anymore, or (b) the community felt as Oracle's top engineering brass did, that getting this release "right" was far better than getting it out on the promised deadline. And while I agree with the (b) group on that, it still means that the prediction was way off. 2-4.

  • THEN:Microsoft will start courting the .NET developers again.

    NOW: Quite frankly, this one got left in dust almost the moment that Ballmer's retirement was announced. Whatever emphasis the company as a whole might have put into courting .NET developers back into the fold was immediately shelved, at least until a successor comes in to take Ballmer's place and decide what kind of strategy the company as a whole will pursue. Granted, the individual divisions within Microsoft, most notably DevDiv, continue to try and woo the developer community, but that was always going to be the case. However, the lack of any central "push" from the company effectively meant that the perceived "push" against .NET in favor of WinRT was almost immediately left behind, and the subsequent declaration of the Surface's failure (and Surface was by far the most public and prominent of the WinRT-based devices) from most corners meant that most .NET developers who cared about this breathed a sigh of relief and no longer felt those Microsoft cyclical Darwinian crosshairs (the same ones that claimed first C programmers, then C++ programmers, then COM programmers) on their back. Still, no points. 2-5.

  • THEN:Samsung will start pushing themselves further and further into the consumer market.

    NOW: And boy, howdy, did they. Samsung not only released several new versions of their various devices into the market, but they've also really pushed their consumer electronics in other form factors, too, such as their TVs and such. If there is a rival to Apple in the consumer electronics department, it is clearly Samsung, and the various court cases and patent violation filings are obvious verification of that. 3-5.

  • THEN:Apple's next release cycle will, again, be "more of the same".

    NOW: Can you say "iPhone 5c", and "iPad Air", boys and girls? Even iOS7 is basically the same OS, with a skinnier font and--oh, wow, innovation!--nested folders. 4-5.

  • THEN:Visual Studio 2014 features will start being discussed at the end of the year.

    NOW: Microsoft tossed me a major curve ball with their announcement of quarterly releases, and the subsequent release of Visual Studio 2013, and as a result, we haven't really seen the traditional product hype cycle out of the Microsoft DevDiv that we're used to. Again, how much of that is due to internal confusion over how to project their next-gen products out into the world without a clear Ballmer successor, and how much of that was planned from the beginning isn't clear, but either way, we ain't heard a peep outta nobody about C# 6 at all in 2013, so... 4-6.

  • THEN:Scala interest wanes.

    NOW: If anything, the opposite took place--Typesafe, Scala's owner/pimp/corporate backer, made some pretty splashy headlines within the JVM community, and lots of people talked a lot about it in places where Scala wasn't being discussed before. We can argue about whether that indicates just a strong marketing effort (where before Typesafe's formation there really was none) or actual growth in acceptance, but either way, I can't claim that it "waned", so the score becomes 4-7.

  • THEN:Interest in native languages will rise.

    NOW: Again, this one is hard to judge. There's been some uptick in interest in those native languages (Rust, Go, etc), and certainly there's been some interesting buzz around some kind of Phoenix-like rise of C++, but none of it has really made waves within the mainstream that I can see. (Then again, I don't really spend a lot of time in those areas where native languages would have made a larger mark, so this could be observer's contextual bias at work here.) That said, more native-based languages are emerging, and certainly Apple's interest and support in LLVM (which, contrary to it's name, is not really a "virtual machine", per se) can be seen as such, but not enough to make me feel comfortable saying I got this one right. 4-8.

  • THEN:Hardware is the new platform.

    NOW: Surface was a bust. Chromebooks hardly registered on anybody's radar. Dell threw out an arguable Surface-killer tablet, but for most consumer-minded folks it never even crossed their minds, it seems. Hardware may be the new platform, and certainly we're seeing a lot of non-x86-based machines continuing their race into consumers' hands, but most consumers don't think twice about the hardware as much as they do the visible projection of that hardware choice, in the operating system. (Think about it this way: when you go buy a device, do you care about the CPU, or the OS--iOS, Android, Windows8--running it?) 4-9.

  • THEN:APIs for lots of things are going to come out.

    NOW: Oh, my, yes. More on this later, but for now... 5-9.

Well, with a final tally of 5 "rights" to 9 "wrongs", clearly my 2013 record was about as win-filled as the Baltimore Ravens' 2013 record. *sigh* Oh, well, can't win 'em all every year, right?

2014 Predictions

Now, though, let's do the fun part: What does Ted think 2014 has in store for us geeky types?

  • iOS, Android and Windows8 start to move into your car. Audi has already announced this. Ford announced this last year with their SDK release. Frankly, with all the emphasis on "wearable tech" and "alternative tech", this seems a natural progression, considering how much time Americans, at least, spend time in their car. What, exactly, people will want software developers to do with this capability remains entirely unclear to me (and, it seems, to everybody else, given the lack of apps for the Ford SDK so far), but auto manufacturers will put it into their 2015 models just because their competitors are starting to, and the auto industry is one place were you cannot be seen as not keeping up with the neighbors.
  • Wearable tech hypes up (with little to no actual adoption or innovation). The Samsung Smart Watch is out, one of nearly a dozen models introduced in 2013. Then there was Google Glass. And given that the tech industry is a frequent "hype it before we even barely know it's going to work" kind of place, this one seems like another fast breakway layup kind of claim. Note that I fully expect that what we see offered will, in time, be as hip and as cool as the original Newton, meaning that these first iterations will be stumblin', fumblin', bumblin' attempts to try and see what anybody can do with these things to make them even remotely useful, and that unless you like living on the very edge of techno-geekery, there'll be absolutely zero reason for anyone to get one for at least calendar year 2014.
  • Apple's gadgets will be more of the same. Same one as last year: iPhone, iPad, iPod, MacBook, they're all going to be incremental refinements on what we see already. There will be no AppleTV, there will be no iWatch, there will be no radical new laptop-ish thing. Apple is clearly the market leader, and they are clearly in the grips of the Innovator's Dilemma, and they have no clear challenger (yet) that threatens to dethrone them, leaving them with no reason to shake up the status quo.
  • Android market consolidates further around Samsung and Motorola. The Android consumer market has slowly been collapsing around those two manufacturers, and I don't see any reason for that trend to change. Yes, other carriers will continue to offer Android on their devices, and yes, other device manufacturers will continue to put Android on their devices, and yes, Android will continue to appear on things other than tablets and phones, but as far as the consumer electronics world goes, the Android market will be classified as Samsung, Motorola, and everybody else.
  • We'll see one iOS release, two minor Android releases, and maybe two Windows8 minor releases. The players are basically set, the game plans are already in play, and nobody appears to have any kind of major game-changing feature set in the wings. 2014 will be a year of minor releases, tweaks to the existing systems and UIs, minor software improvements, and so on. I can't see the mobile market getting any kind of major shock or surprise this year.
  • Windows 8/8.1/9/whatever gains a little respect, but not market share gains. Windows8 as a tablet OS has been quietly gathering some converts, particularly among those who didn't find themselves on the WindowsStore-only SurfaceRTs, and as such, I think the "Windows line" will begin to gather more "critics' choice" kinds of respect, but that's not going to translate into much in the way of consumer sales. Unfortunately for the Microsoftians, Windows as of yet doesn't demonstrate any kind of compelling reason to choose it over the other two market leaders (iOS and Android), and until that happens, Windows8, as a device OS, remains a distant third and always will.
  • UI/UX emphasis is going to start moving to "alternate" input streams. Microsoft's Kinect has demonstrated that gesture is a viable input technology. Google Glass demonstrated that eyeballs can drive a UI. Voice commands are making their way into console gaming/media devices (XBox, etc). This year, enterprise and business developers, looking for ways to make a splash and justify greater research budgets, are going to start experimenting with how those "alternative" kinds of input can be utilized in non-gaming scenarios. Particularly when combined with the rise of automobiles offering programmable SDKs/platforms (see above), this represents a huge, rich area for exploration.
  • Java-the-language starts to see a resurgence of "mojo". Java8 will ship this year--not even God Himself could stop that at this point. And once it does, Java-the-language will see a revitalization as developers who've been flirting with Groovy, Scala, Clojure, and other lambda-supporting languages but can't use them on the job start to bring those ideas into Java APIs. Google's already been doing this with Guava, but now many of those ideas--already percolating in some libraries--will explode into common usage.
  • Meanwhile, this will be a quiet year for C#. The big news coming out of Microsoft, "Roslyn", the "compiler-as-a-service" rewrite of the C# and Visual Basic compilers, won't be of much use to most developers on a practical level, and as a result, this will likely be a pretty quiet year for C# and VB.
  • Functional languages will remain "hipster" tools that most people can't use. Haskell remains far out of reach for most developers, and that's the most approachable of the various functional languages discussed. (Don't even get me started on Julia, Pure, Clean, or any of the others.) As much as I wish to the contrary, this is also likely to remain true for several of the "hybrid" languages, like Scala, F#, and Clojure, though I do think they will see some modest growth as some of the upper-echelon development community begins to grok them. Those who understand them will continue to do some amazing things with them, but this is not the year I would suggest starting a business with anything "functional" as part of its business model, because not only will it be difficult to find developers who can use those tools, but trying to sell developer-facing things with those tools at the core will find a pretty dry and dusty market.
  • Dynamic languages will see continued growth and success. Ruby doesn't look to be slowing down, Node/JavaScript only looks to get more hyped, and Objective-C remains the dominant language for doing iOS development, which itself doesn't look to be slowing down. More importantly, I think we're going to start to see a rise in hybrid "static/dynamic" languages, wherein developers can choose (based on the way they write their code) compiler enforcement as they wish. Between the introduction of "invokedynamic" in Java7 (and its deeper use in Java8), and "dynamic" in C# getting some serious exercise in the Oak framework, I'm becoming more and more convinced that having a language that supports both static and dynamic typing capabilities represents the best compromise between those two poles of software development languages. That said, neither Java nor C# "gets it all the way right" on this topic, and I suspect that somewhere out there, there's a language hacker who's got a few ideas that he or she will trot out and make us all go "Doh!"
  • HTML 5 "fragmentation" will start to echo in the industry. Unfortunately, HTML 5 is not the same thing to all browsers, and those who are looking to HTML 5 as a way to save them from platform differences are going to start to feel some pain. That, in turn, is going to lead to some backlash as they are forced to deal with something they thought they were going to be saved from.
  • "Mobile browsers" become just "browsers". With the explosive growth of devices (tablets and phones) and the explosive growth of the capabilities of those devices (processor(s), memory, and so on), the need for a "crippled" or "low-end-optimized" browser has effectively gone the way of the Dodo bird. As a result...
  • "Mobile web" starts a slow, steady slide into irrelevancy. ... sites optimized for "mobile" browsing experiences--which represents a non-trivial development effort in most cases--will start to drop away, mostly due to neglect. Instead...
  • "Responsive web" becomes the new black. ... we'll see web sites using CSS frameworks (among other tools) to build user interfaces that adjust themselves to the physical viewsizes and input capabilities of the target browser. Bootstrap is an obvious frontrunner here for building said kinds of user interfaces, but don't be surprised if a number of other CSS and JavaScript frameworks to achieve the same ends start to spring up.
  • Microsoft fails to name a Ballmer successor. Yeah, this one's a stretch. It's absolutely inconceivable that they wouldn't. And yet, in all honesty, I can't see the Microsoft board finding somebody that meets Bill's approval from outside of the company, and I can't imagine anyone inside of the company who isn't somehow "tainted" by the various internecine wars that have been fought since Bill's departure. It is, quite frankly, a mess, and I don't know that it'll be cleaned up before this time next year. It would be a horrible result were that to be the case, by the way, but... *shrug* I dunno. Pretty clearly, whomever it is, is going to have a monumental task in front of them.
  • "Programmable Web" becomes an even bigger thing, leading companies to develop APIs that make no sense to anybody. Right now, as we spin up 2014, it's become the fashionable thing to build your website not as an HTML-based presentation layer website, but as a series of APIs. For some companies, that makes sense; for others, though, that is going to be a seductive Siren song that leads them to a huge development effort for little payoff. Note, I think almost all companies have interesting data and/or resources that can be exposed as APIs that would lead to some powerful mashups--I'm not arguing otherwise. But what I think we're about to stumble into is the cargo-culting blind obedience to the letter of the idea that so many companies undertake when a new concept hits the industry hard, as "Web APIs" are doing now.
  • Five new single-page JavaScript MVC application frameworks will ship and gather interest. For those of you who know me from the Java world, remember the 2000s and the huge glut of open-source Web frameworks that led us all into analysis paralysis for a half-decade or more? I see absolutely no reason why the exact same thing isn't already under way in the JavaScript Web framework world, with the added delicious twist that in the JavaScript world, we can do it on BOTH the client AND the server. Let the forking begin.
  • Apple's MacPro machine inspires dozens of knock-off clones. When the MacBook came out, silver-metal cases with chiclet keyboards suddenly appeared all over the PC clone market. When the MacBook Air came out, suddenly thin was in. What on Earth makes us think that the trashcan-sized MacPro desktop/server isn't gong to have exactly the same effect?
  • Desktop machine sales creep slightly higher. Work this through with me before you shoot it down out of hand: Tablet sales are continuing to skyrocket, and nothing seems to change that. But people still need to produce stuff (reports, articles, etc), and that really requires a keyboard. But if tablets are easier to consume data on the road, you're more likely to carry your tablet instead of your laptop (and most people--myself wildly excluded--don't like carrying more than one or at most two devices with them). Assuming that your mobile workload is light enough that you can "get by" using your tablet, and you don't want to carry a laptop *and* a tablet, you're more likely to leave your laptop at home or at work. Once your laptop is a glorified workstation, why pay that added premium for a laptop at all? In other words, I think people are going to start doing this particular math, and while tablets will continue to eat away at the "I need a mobile computing solution" sales, desktops are going to start to eat away at the "I need a computing solution for my desk" sales. Don't believe me? Look around the office at all the workstations powered by laptops already, and then start looking at whether those laptops are actually being used as laptops, and whether that mobility need could, in fact, be replaced by a far lighter tablet. It's a stretch, and it may not hit in 2014, but I really think that the world is going to slowly stratify into an 80/20 split of tablets and desktops.
  • Dozens of new "cloud" platforms will be introduced, and most of them will remain entirely irrelevant behind the "Big Three". Lots of the big players are going to start tossing out their version of a cloud platform if they haven't already (HP, Oracle, IBM, I'm looking at you), and smaller players are going to start offering "cloud" platforms of their own (a la Rackspace), but fundamentally, the cloud will remain a "Big Three" place: Amazon's AWS, Microsoft's Azure, and Google's Cloud Platform.
  • We will never see any kind of official announcement, much less actual working prototypes, around Amazon's "Drone Delivery" program ever again. Sure, Jeff made a splash when he announced it. Sure, it resonates with the geek crowd. Sure, it seems like a spiffy idea on paper. Do you have any idea of how much infrastructure and overhead (and potential for failure that has nothing to do with geeks deploying "anti-drone defenses") would be involved? No way. What's more, Amazon is not really in the shipping business (as the all-but-failed Amazon "deliver groceries to your front door" program highlights), but in the "We'll sell it to you and ship it through somebody else" business. It's a cool idea, but it'll never, ever, EVER, see the light of day.

As always, thanks for reading, and keep this channel open--I've got some news percolating about my next new adventure that I'm planning to "splash" in mid-January. It won't be too surprising, but it's exciting (at least to me), and hopefully represents an adventure that I can still be... uh... adventuring... for years to come.


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Friday, January 03, 2014 12:35:25 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Monday, December 09, 2013
On Endings

A while back, I mentioned that I had co-founded a startup (LiveTheLook); I'm saddened to report that just after Halloween, my co-founder and I split up, and I'm no longer affiliated with the company except as an adviser and equity shareholder. There were a lot of reasons for the split, most notably that we had some different ideas on how to execute and how to spend the limited seed money we'd managed to acquire, but overall, we just weren't communicating well.

While I'm sad to no longer be involved with LtL, I wish Francesca and the company nothing but success for the future, and in the meantime I'm exploring options and figuring out what my next great adventure will be. It's not the greatest time of the year (the "dead zone" between Thanksgiving and Christmas) to be doing it, but fortunately I've gotten a few leads that may turn out to be hits. We'll have to see. And, while we're sorting that out, I've got plans for things to work on in the meantime, including a partnership effort with my eldest son on a game he invented.

So, what I'm saying here is that if anyone's desperate for consulting, now's a great time to reach out, because I can be bought. :-)


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Monday, December 09, 2013 8:59:24 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Thursday, August 29, 2013
Seattle (and other) GiveCamps

Too often, geeks are called upon to leverage their technical expertise (which, to most non-technical peoples' perspective, is an all-encompassing uni-field, meaning if you are a DBA, you can fix a printer, and if you are an IT admin, you know how to create a cool HTML game) on behalf of their friends and family, often without much in the way of gratitude. But sometimes, you just gotta get your inner charitable self on, and what's a geek to do then? Doctors have "Doctors Without Boundaries", and lawyers can always do work "pro bono" for groups like the Innocence Project and so on, but geeks....? Sure, you could go and join the Peace Corps, but that's hardly going to really leverage your skills, and Lord knows, there's a ton of places (charities) that could use a little IT love while you're off in a damp and dismal jungle somewhere.

(Not you, Seattle. You're just damp today. Dismal won't be for another few months, when it's raining for weeks on end.)

(As if in response, the rain comes down even harder.)

About five or so years ago, a Microsoft employee realized that geeks didn't really have an outlet for their desires to volunteer and help out in their communities through the skills they have patiently mastered. So Chris created GiveCamp, an organization dedicated to hosting "GiveCamps" all over the US, bringing volunteer developers, designers, and other IT professionals together with charities that need some IT love, whether that's in the form of a new mobile app, some touch-up on the website, a port from a Microsoft Access app to something even remotely more modern, or whatever.

Seattle GiveCamp is coming up, October 11-13, at the Microsoft Commons. No technical bias is implied by that--GiveCamp isn't an evangelism event, it's a "let's help people" event. Bring your Java, PHP, Python, and yes, maybe even your Perl, and create some good karma for groups that are doing good things. And for those of you not local to Seattle, there's lots of other GiveCamps being planned all over the country--consider volunteering at one nearby.


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Thursday, August 29, 2013 12:19:45 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Monday, August 19, 2013
Programming Interviews

Apparently I have become something of a resource on programming interviews: I've had three people tell me they read the last two blog posts, one because his company is hiring and he wants his people to be doing interviews right, and two more expressing shock that I still get interviewed--which I don't really think is all that fair, more on that in a moment--and relief that it's not just them getting grilled on areas that they don't believe to be relevant to the job--and more on that in a moment, too.

A couple of things have emerged in the last few weeks since the saga described earlier, so I thought I'd wrap the thing up with a final post. Besides, I like things that come in threes.

First, go see this video. Jonathan pinged me about it shortly after the second blog post came out, and damn if he and Mitch don't nail a bunch of things directly on the head. Specifically, I want to call out two lists they put into their slides (which I can't find online, or I'd include a link, sorry).

One, what are the things you're trying to answer in an interview? They call it out as three questions an interviewer or interview team is seeking to answer:

  1. Can they do the job?
  2. Will they be motivated?
  3. Would they get along with the team?
Personally, #2 to me is a red herring--frankly, I expect that if you, the candidate, take a job with my company, then either you have determined that you will be motivated to work here, or else you can force yourself to be. I don't really expect you to be the company cheerleader (unless, of course, I'm hiring you for that role), but I do expect professionalism: that you will be at work when you are scheduled or expected to be, that you will do quality work while you are there, and that you will look to make the best decisions possible given the information you have at the time. Motivation is not something I should be interviewing for; it's something you should be bringing.

But the other two? Spot-on.

And this brings me to my interim point: I'm not opposed to a programming test. I think I gave the impression to a number of readers that I think that I'm too good or too famous or whatever to be tested on my skills; that's the furthest thing from the truth. I think you most certainly should be verifying that I have the technical chops to do the job you want me to do; what I do want to suggest, however, is that for a number of candidates (myself included), there are ways to determine my technical chops without forcing me to stand at a whiteboard and code with a pen. For some candidates, you can examine their GitHub profile and see how many repos they have that're public (and have a look through some of the code they wrote). In fact, what I think would be a great interview question would be to look at a repo they haven't touched in a year, find some element of the code inside there, and ask them to explain what they were thinking when they wrote it. If it's well-documented, or if it's simple code, they'll be able to do that fairly quickly (once they context-swap to the codebase--got to give them time to remember, after all). If it's a complex or tricky bit, and they can't explain it...

... well, you just learned something about the code they write, now didn't you?

In my case, I have no public GitHub profile to choose from, but I'm an edge case, in that you can also watch my videos, and/or read my books and articles. Granted, there's a chance that I have amazing editors who save me from incredible stupidity and make me look good... but what are the chances that somebody is doing that for over a decade, across several technology platforms, and all without any credit? Probably pretty close to nil, IMHO. I'm not unique in this case--there's others whose work more or less speaks for itself, and I think you're disrespecting the candidate if you don't do your homework on the interview first.

Which, by the way, brings up another point: As an interviewer, you have a responsibility to do your homework on the candidate before they walk in the door, particularly if you're expecting them to have done their homework on your firm. Don't waste my time (and yours, particularly since yours is probably a LOT more expensive than mine, considering that a lot of companies are doing "interview loops" these days with a team of people, and all of their time adds up). If you're not going to take my candidacy seriously, why should I take your job or job offer or interview seriously?

The second list Jon and Mitch call out is their "interviewing antipatterns" list:

  • The Riddler
  • The Disorienter
  • The Stone Tablet
  • The Knuth Fanatic
  • The Cram Session
  • Groundhog Day
  • The Gladiator
  • Hear No Evil
I want you to watch the video, so I'm not going to summarize each here; go watch it. If you're in a position of doing hiring, ask yourself how many of those you yourself are perpetrating.

Second, go read this article. I don't like that he has "Dig into algorithms, data structures, code organization, simplicity" as one of his takeaways, because I think most interviewers are going to see "algorithms" and "data structures" and stop there, but the rest seems pretty spot-on.

Third, ask yourself the critical question: What, exactly, are we doing wrong? You think you're an agile organization? Then ask yourself how much feedback you get on your interviewing process, and how you would know if you screwed it up. Yes, you will know if hire a bad candidate, but how will you know if you're letting good candidates go? Maybe you're the hot company that everybody wants to work at, and you can afford to throw some wheat out with the chaff a few times, but you're not going to be in that position for long if you do, and more importantly, you're not going to be in that position for long, period. If you don't start trying to improve your hiring process now, by the time you need to, it'll be too late.

Fourth, practice! When unit-testing came out, many programmers said, "I don't need to test my code, my code is great!", and then everybody had a good laugh at their expense. Yet I see a lot of companies say essentially the same thing about their hiring and interview practices. How do you test an interview process? Easy--interview yourselves. Work with known-good conditions (people you know, people who work with you already, and so on), and run them through the process, but with the critical stipulation that you must treat them exactly as you would a candidate. If you look at your tech lead and say, "Yeah, this is where I'd ask you a technical question, but I already know...", then unless you're prepared to do that for your candidates, you're cheating yourself on the feedback. It's exactly like saying, "Yeah, this is where I'd write a test checking to see how we handle a null in that second parameter, but I already know...". If you're not prepared to do the latter, don't do the former. (And if you are prepared to do the latter, then I probably don't want to work with you anyway.)

Fifth, remember: Interviewing is not easy! It's not easy on the candidates, and it shouldn't be on you. It would be great if you could just test somebody on one dimension of themselves and call it good, but as much as people want to pretend that a programmer is just a code-spewing cog in a machine, they're not. If you want well-rounded candidates, then you must interview all aspects of that well-roundedness to determine if they are or not.

Whatever you interview for, that's what you will get.


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Monday, August 19, 2013 9:30:55 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Thursday, July 25, 2013
More on the Programming Tests Saga

A couple of people had asked how the story with the company that triggered the "I Hate Programming Tests" post ended, so I figured I'd follow up with the rest of that story, and some thoughts.

After handing in the disjoint-set solution I'd come up with, the VP pondered things for a bit, then decided to bring me in for an in-person interview loop with a half-dozen of the others that work there. I said I'd be happy to, and came in, did a brief meet-and-greet with the group of folks I'd be interviewing with (plus, I think, a few others), and then we got to the first interview mono-a-mono, and after a brief "Are you familiar with MVC?", we get into...

... another algorithm challenge. A walk-up-to-the-whiteboard-and-code-this challenge.

OK, whatever. I already said I'm not great with algorithmic challenges like this, but maybe this guy didn't get the memo or he's just trying to see how I reason things through. So, sure, let's attack this, even though I haven't done this kind of problem in like twenty years. (One of the challenges was "How do you sort a file of integer numbers when you can't store the entire collection of numbers in memory?", which wasn't an unfair challenge, just not something that I generally have to mess with. Honestly, in the working world, I'll start by going through the file number by number--or do chunks of the file in parallel using actors, if the file is large enough--and shove them into a database that's indexed on that number. But, of course, as with all of these kinds of challenges, the interviewer continues to throw constraints at the problem until we either get to the solution he wants or Ted runs out of imagination; in this case, I think it was the latter.) End result: not a positive win.

Next interviewer walks in, he wasn't there for the meet-and-greet, which means he has even less context about me than the guy before me, and he immediately asks... another algorithmic challenge. "If you have a tree of nodes, and you want to get a list of the nodes in rank order" (meaning, a breadth-first search, where each node now gets a "sibling" pointer pointing to the sibling on its right in the tree, or null if it's the rightmost node at that depth level) "how would you do it?" Again, a fail, and now I'm getting annoyed. I admitted, from the outset, that this is not the kind of stuff I'm good at. We've already made that point. I accept the "F" on that part of my report card. What's even more annoying, the interviewer keeps sighing and drumming his fingers in an obvious state of "Why is this bozo wasting my time like this, I could be doing something vastly more important" and so on, which, gotta say, was kind of distracting. End result: total fail.

By this point, I'm really annoyed. The VP comes to meet me, asks how it's going, and I tell him, flatly, "Sucks." He nods, says, yeah, we're going to kill the interview loop early, but I want to talk to you over lunch (with another employee along for company) and then have you meet with one more person before we end the exercise.

Lunch goes quite well, actually, and the last interview of the day is with their Product Manager, who then presents me with a challenge: "Suppose I want to build an online system for ordering pizzas. Customers can order pizzas, in other words. Build for me either the UI or the data model for this system." OK, this is different. I choose the data model, and build a ridiculously simple one-to-many relationship of customers to orders, and a similar one-to-many for orders to pizzas. She then proceeds to complicate the model step by step, sometimes in response to my questions, sometimes out of the blue, until we have a fairly complex roughly-sketched data model on the whiteboard. Result: win.

The VP at this point is on the horns of a dilemma: two of the engineers in the interview loop are convinced I'm an idiot. They're clearly voting no on this. But he's read my articles, he's seen some of my presentations, he knows I'm not the idiot the others assume me to be, and he's now trying to figure out what his next steps are. He takes a week to think about it, then emails me yesterday to say that it's not going to work.

Here's my thoughts, and folks, if you interview people or are part of an interview process, I'm trying to generalize this beyond this one experience to take it into a larger context:

  • Know what you want to prove with your interview. I get the feeling that this interview loop was essentially a repeat of every interview loop they've ever done before, with no consideration to the candidate himself. An interview is a chance for the company to get to know the candidate better, in order to make a well-informed decision. In this particular case, trying to suss out my skills around algorithms was a wasted effort--I'd already conceded that point. Therefore, find new questions! Find new areas in which to challenge the candidate to see what their skills are. (If you can't think of something else to ask, then you're not really thinking about the interview all that hard, and you're just going through the motions.)
  • Look for the proof you seek in other areas. With the growth of things like Github and open source projects in general, it's becoming easier and easier to prove to yourself as a company that a candidate does or does not have the coding skills you're looking for. Did this guy submit some pull requests to a project? Did this guy post some blogs about interesting technical tidbits? (Or, Lord help us, write articles for major publications?) Did this guy author an open-source project, or work on a project that other people know about? Look at it this way: If Anders Heljsberg, Bjarne Stroustrup or James Gosling walk through the door, are you going to put them through the same interview questions you put the random recruiter-found candidate goes through? Or are you willing to consider their established body of work and call it covered? As an interviewer, it behooves you to look for that established body of work, so that you can spend the interview loop looking at other things.
  • Be clear in what you want. One of the things the VP said to me was that he was looking for somebody who had a similar skillset to what he had; that is, had a architectural view of things and an interest in managing the people involved. By then submitting my candidacy to a series of tests that didn't really test for those things, he essentially torpedoed whatever chances it might have had.
  • Be willing to assert your authority. If you're the VP of the company, and the people who work for you disagree with your decisions, sometimes the Right Thing To Do is to simply overrule them. Yes, I know, it's not all politically correct to do that, and if you do it too often you'll ruin whatever sense of empowerment that you want your employees to have within the company, but there are times when you just need to assert that authority and say, "You know what? I appreciate y'all's input, but this is one of those cases where I think I have a different enough perspective that I am going to just overrule and do it anyway." Sometimes you'll be right, yay, and sometimes you'll be wrong, boo, but there is a reason you're the VP or the Director or the Team Lead, and not the others. Leadership means making hard decisions sometimes.
  • Be willing to change up the process. So your candidate comes in, and they're a junior programmer who's just graduated college, with zero experience. Do you then start asking them questions about their experience? That would be a waste of their time and yours. So you'll have to come up with new questions and a new approach. Not all interviews have to be carbon copies of each other, because certainly your candidates aren't carbon copies of each other. (At least, you'd better hope not, or else you're going to end up with a pretty single-dimensional staff.) If they've proven their strength in some category, or admitted a lack in another, then drop your standard set of questions, and go to something different. There is no honor in asking the exact same questions of every candidate.
  • Be willing to hire somebody that offers complementary skills. If your company already has a couple of engineers who know algorithms really well, then hire somebody for a different skillset. Likewise, if your company already has a couple of people who are really good with customers, you don't need another one. Look for people that have skills that fall outside the realm of what you currently have, and trust that when that individual is presented with a problem that attacks their weakness, they'll turn to somebody else in the firm to help them with it. When presented with an algorithmic challenge, you're damn well sure that I'm going to turn to somebody next to me and say, "Hey, dude? Help me walk through this for a bit, would you?" And, in turn, if that engineer has to give a presentation to a customer, and they turn to me and say, "Hey, dude? Help me work on this presentation, would you?", I'm absolutely ready to chip in. That's how teams are built. That's why we have teams in the first place.
In the end, this is probably the best of all possible scenarios, not working for them, particularly since I have some other things brewing that will likely consume all of my attention in the coming months, but there's that part of me that hates the fact that I failed at this. That same part of me is now going back through a few of the "interview challenges" books that I picked up, ironically, for my eldest son when he goes out and does his programming interviews, just to work through a few of the problems because I HATE feeling inadequate to a challenge.

And that, in turn, raises my next challenge: I want to create a website, just a static thing, that has a series of questions that, I think, are far better coding challenges than the ones I was given. I don't know when or if I'm going to get to this, but I gotta believe that any of the problems out of the book "Programming Challenges" (by Skiena and Revilla, Springer-Verlag, 2003) or the website from which those challenges were drawn, would be a much better test of the candidate's ability, particularly if you look at the ancillary parts of the challenge: do they write tests, how do they write their tests, do they pair well with somebody, and so on. THOSE are the things you really care about, not how well they remember their college lessons, which are easily accessible over Google or StackOverflow.

Bottom line: Your time is precious, people. Interview well, or just don't bother.


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Thursday, July 25, 2013 2:19:48 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Tuesday, July 09, 2013
Programming Tests

It's official: I hate them.

Don't get me wrong, I understand their use and the reasons why potential employers give them out. There's enough programmers in the world who aren't really skilled enough for the job (whatever that job may be) that it becomes necessary to offer some kind of litmus test that a potential job-seeker must pass. I get that.

And it's not like all the programming tests in the world are created equal: some are pretty useful ways to demonstrate basic programming facilities, a la the FizzBuzz problem. Or some of the projects I've seen done, a la the "Robot on Mars" problem that ThoughtWorks handed out to candidates (a robot lands on Mars, which happens to be a cartesian grid; assuming that we hand the robot these instructions, such as LFFFRFFFRRFFF, where "L" is a "turn 90 degrees left", "R" is a "turn 90 degrees right", and "F" is "go forward one space, please write control code for the robot such that it ends up at the appropriate-and-correct destination, and include unit tests), are good indicators of how a candidate could/would handle a small project entirely on his/her own.

But the ones where the challenge is to implement some algorithmic doodad or other? *shudder*.

For example, one I just took recently asks candidates to calculate the "disjoint sets" of a collection of sets; in other words, given sets of { 1, 2, 3 }, { 1, 2, 4 } and { 1, 2, 5 }, the result should be sets of {1,2},{3},{4}, and {5}. Do this and calculate the big-O notation for your solution in terms of time and of space/memory.

I hate to say this, but in twenty years of programming, I've never had to do this. Granted, I see the usefulness of it, and granted, it's something that, given large enough sets and large enough numbers of sets, will make a significant difference that it bears examination, but honestly, in times past when I've been confronted with this problem, I'm usually the first to ask somebody next to me how best to think about this, and start sounding out some ideas with them before writing any bit of code. Unit tests to test input and its expected responses are next. Then I start looking for the easy cases to verify before I start attacking the algorithm in its entirety, usually with liberal help from Google and StackOverflow.

But in a programming test, you're doing this alone (which already takes away a significant part of my approach, because being an "external processor", I think by talking out loud), and if it's timed (such as this one was), you're tempted to take a shortcut and forgo some of the setup (which I did) in order to maximize the time spent hacking, and when you end up down a wrong path (such as I did), you have nothing to fall back on.

Granted, I screwed up, in that I should've stuck to my process and simply said, "Here's how far I got in the hour". But when you've been writing code for twenty years, across three major platforms, for dozens of Fortune 500 companies and architected platforms that others will use to build software and services for thousands of users and customers, you feel like you should be able to hack something like this out fairly quickly.

And when you can't, you feel like a failure.

I hate programming tests.

Update: By the way, as always, I would love some suggestions on how to accomplish the disjoint-set problem. I kept thinking I was close, but was missing one key element. I particularly would LOVE a nudge in doing it in a object-functional language, like F# or Scala (I've only attempted it in C# so far). Just a nudge, though--I want to work through it myself, so I learn.

Postscript An analogy hit me shortly after posting this: it's almost as if, in order to test a master carpenter's skill at carpentry, you ask him to build a hammer. After all, if he's all that good, he should be able to do something as simple as affix a metal head to a wooden shaft and have the result be a superior device to anything he could buy off the shelf, right?

Further update: After writing this, I took a break, had some dinner, played a game of Magic: The Gathering with my wife and kids (I won, but I can't be certain they didn't let me win, since they knew I was grumpy about not getting this test done in time), and then came back to it. I built up a series of little steps, backed by unit tests to make sure I was stepping through my attempts at reasoning out the algorithm correctly, backed up once or twice with a new approach, and finally solved it in about three hours, emailing it to the company at 6am (0600 for those of you reading this across the Atlantic or from a keyboard marked "Property of US Armed Forces"), just for grins. I wasn't expecting to get a response, since I was grossly beyond the time allotted, but apparently it was good enough to merit a follow-up interview, so yay for me. :-) Upshot is, though, I have an implementation that works, though now I find myself wondering if there's a way to do it in a functional/no-side-effect/persistent-data-structure kind of way....

I still hate them, though, at least the algorithm-based ones, and in a fleeting moment of transparent honesty, I will admit it's probably because I'm not very good at them, but if you repeat that to anyone I'll deny it as outrageous slander and demand satisfaction, Nerf guns at ten paces.


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Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:02:11 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Wednesday, May 01, 2013
More on Types

With my most recent blog post, some of you were a little less than impressed with the idea of using types, One reader, in particular, suggested that:

Your encapsulating type aliases don't... encapsulate :|

Actually, it kinda does. But not in the way you described.

using X = qualified.type;

merely introduces an alias, and will consequently (a) not prevent assignment of
a FirstName to a LastName (b) not even be detectible as such from CLI metadata
(i.e. using reflection).

This is true—the using statement only introduces an alias, in much the same way that C++’s “typedef” does. It’s not perfect, by any real means.

Also, the alias is lexically scoped, and doesn't actually _declare a public name_ (so, it would need to be redeclared in all 'client' compilation units.

(This won't be done, of course, because the clients would have no clue about
this and happily be passing `System.String` as ever).

The same goes for C++ typedefs, or, indeed C++11 template aliases:

using FirstName = std::string;
using LastName = std::string;

You'd be better off using BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF (or a roll-your-own version of this thing that is basically a CRTP pattern with some inherited constructors. When your compiler has the latter feature, you could probably do without an evil MACRO).

All of which is also true. Frankly, the “using” statement is a temporary stopgap, simply a placeholder designed to say, “In time, this will be replaced with a full-fledged type.”

And even more to the point, he fails to point out that my “Age” class from my example doesn’t really encapsulate the fact that Age is, fundamentally, an “int” under the covers—because Age possesses type conversion operators to convert it into an int on demand (hence the “implicit” in that operator declaration), it’s pretty easy to get it back to straight “int”-land. Were I not so concerned with brevity, I’d have created a type that allowed for addition on it, though frankly I probably would forbid subtraction, and most certainly multiplication and division. (What does multiplying an Age mean, really?)

See, in truth, I cheated, because I know that the first reaction most O-O developers will have is, “Are you crazy? That’s tons more work—just use the int!” Which, is both fair, and an old argument—the C guys said the same thing about these “object” things, and how much work it was compared to just declaring a data structure and writing a few procedures to manipulate them. Creating a full-fledged type for each domain—or each fraction of a domain—seems… heavy.

Truthfully, this is much easier to do in F#. And in Scala. And in a number of different languages. Unfortunately, in C#, Java, and even C++ (and frankly, I don’t think the use of an “evil MACRO” is unwarranted, if it doesn’t promote bad things). The fact that “doing it right” in those languages means “doing a ton of work to get it right” is exactly why nobody does it—and suffers the commensurate loss of encapsulation and integrity in their domain model.

Another poster pointed out that there is a much better series on this at http://www.fsharpforfunandprofit.com. In particular, check out the series on "Designing with Types"—it expresses everything I wanted to say, albeit in F# (where I was trying, somewhat unsuccessfully, to example-code it in C#). By the way, I suspect that almost every linguistic feature he uses would translate pretty easily/smoothly over to Scala (or possibly Clojure) as well.

Another poster pointed out that doing this type-driven design (TDD, anyone?) would create some serious havoc with your persistence. Cry me a river, and then go use a persistence model that fits an object-oriented and type-oriented paradigm. Like, I dunno, an object database. Particularly considering that you shouldn’t want to expose your database schema to anyone outside the project anyway, if you’re concerned about code being tightly coupled. (As in, any other code outside this project—like a reporting engine or an ETL process—that accesses your database directly now is tied to that schema, and is therefore a tight-coupling restriction on evolving your schema.)

Achieving good encapsulation isn’t a matter of trying to hide the methods being used—it’s (partly) a matter of allowing the type system to carry a significant percentage of the cognitive load, so that you don’t have to. Which, when you think on it, is kinda what objects and strongly-typed type systems are supposed to do, isn’t it?


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Wednesday, May 01, 2013 2:54:21 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Friday, April 26, 2013
On Types

Recently, having been teaching C# for a bit at Bellevue College, I’ve been thinking more and more about the way in which we approach building object-oriented programs, and particularly the debates around types and type systems. I think, not surprisingly, that the way in which the vast majority of the O-O developers in the world approach types and when/how they use them is flat wrong—both in terms of the times when they create classes when they shouldn’t (or shouldn’t have to, anyway, though obviously this is partly a measure of their language), and the times when they should create classes and don’t.

The latter point is the one I feel like exploring here; the former one is certainly interesting on its own, but I’ll save that for a later date. For now, I want to think about (and write about) how we often don’t create types in an O-O program, and should, because doing so can often create clearer, more expressive programs.

A Person

Common object-oriented parlance suggests that when we have a taxonomical entity that we want to represent in code (i.e., a concept of some form), we use a class to do so; for example, if we want to model a “person” in the world by capturing some of their critical attributes, we do so using a class (in this case, C#):

class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public bool Gender { get; set; }
}

Granted, this is a pretty simplified case; O-O enthusiasts will find lots of things wrong with this code, most of which have to do with dealing with the complexities that can arise.

From here, there’s a lot of ways in which this conversation can get a lot more complicated—how, where and when should inheritance factor into the discussion, for example, and how exactly do we represent the relationship between parents and children (after all, some children will be adopted, some will be natural birth, some will be disowned) and the relationship between various members who wish to engage in some form of marital status (putting aside the political hot-button of same-sex marriage, we find that some states respect “civil unions” even where no formal ceremony has taken place, many cultures still recognize polygamy—one man, many wives—as Utah did up until the mid-1800s, and a growing movement around polyamory—one or more men, one or more women—looks like it may be the next political hot-button around marriage) definitely depends on the business issues in question…

… but that’s the whole point of encapsulation, right? That if the business needs change, we can adapt as necessary to the changed requirements without having to go back and rewrite everything.

Genders

Consider, for example, the rather horrible decision to represent “gender” as a boolean: while, yes, at birth, there are essentially two genders at the biological level, there are some interesting birth defects/disorders/conditions in which a person’s gender is, for lack of a better term, screwed up—men born with female plumbing and vice versa. The system might need to track that. Or, there are those who consider themselves to have been born into the wrong gender, and choose to live a lifestyle that is markedly different from what societal norms suggest (the transgender crowd). Or, in some cases, the gender may not have even been determined yet: fetuses don’t develop gender until about halfway through the pregnancy.

Which suggests, offhand, that the use of a boolean here is clearly a Bad Idea. But what suggests as its replacement? Certainly we could maintain an internal state string or something similar, using the get/set properties to verify that the strings being set are correct and valid, but the .NET type system has a better answer: Given that there is a finite number of choices to gender—whether that’s two or four or a dozen—it seems that an enumeration is a good replacement:

enum Gender
{
    Male, Female,
    Indeterminate,
    Transgender
}

class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public Gender Gender { get; set; }
}

Don’t let the fact that the property and the type have the same name be too confusing—not only does it compile cleanly, but it actually provides some clear description of what’s being stored. (Although, I’ll admit, it’s confusing the first time you look at it.) More importantly, there’s no additional code that needs to be written to enforce only the four acceptable values—or, extend it as necessary when that becomes necessary.

Ages

Similarly, the age of a person is not an integer value—people cannot be negative age, nor do they usually age beyond a hundred or so. Again, we could put code around the get/set blocks of the Age property to ensure the proper values, but it would again be easier to let the type system do all the work:

struct Age
{
    int data;
    public Age(int d)
    {
        Validate(d);
        data = d;
    }

    public static void Validate(int d)
    {
        if (d < 0)
            throw new ArgumentException("Age cannot be negative");
        if (d > 120)
            throw new ArgumentException("Age cannot be over 120");
    }

    // explicit int to Age conversion operator
    public static implicit operator Age(int a)
    { return new Age(a); }

    // explicit Age to int conversion operator
    public static implicit operator int(Age a)
    { return a.data; }
}

class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public Age Age { get; set; }
    public Gender Gender { get; set; }
}

Notice that we’re still having to write the same code, but now the code is embodied in a type, which is itself intrinsically reusable—we can reuse the Age type in other classes, which is more than we can say if that code lives in the Person.Age property getter/setter. Again, too, now the Person class really has nothing to do in terms of ensuring that age is maintained properly (and by that, I mean greater than zero and less than 120). (The “implicit” in the conversion operators means that the code doesn’t need to explicitly cast the int to an Age or vice versa.)

Technically, what I’ve done with Age is create a restriction around the integer (System.Int32 in .NET terms) type; were this XSD Schema types, I could do a derivation-by-restriction to restrict an xsd:int to the values I care about (0 – 120, inclusive). Unfortunately, no O-O language I know of permits derivation-by-restriction, so it requires work to create a type that “wraps” another, in this case, an Int32.

Names

Names are another point of problem, in that there’s all kinds of crazy cases that (as much as we’d like to pretend otherwise) turn out to be far more common than we’d like—not only do most people have middle names, but sometimes women will take their husband’s last name and hyphenate it with their own, making it sort of a middle name but not really, or sometimes people will give their children to multiple middle names, Japanese names put family names first, sometimes people choose to take a single name, and so on. This is again a case where we can either choose to bake that logic into property getters/setters, or bake it into a single type (a “Name” type) that has the necessary code and properties to provide all the functionality that a person’s name represents.

So, without getting into the actual implementation, then, if we want to represent names in the system, then we should have a full-fledged “Name” class that captures the various permutations that arise:

class Name
{  
    public Title Honorific { get { ... } }
    public string Individual { get { ... } }
    public string Nickname { get { ... } }
    public string Family { get { ... } }
    public string Full { get { ... } }
    public static Name Parse(string incoming) { ... } 
}

See, ultimately, everything will have to boil back to the core primitives within the language, but we need to build stronger primitives for the system—Name, Title, Age, and don’t even get me started on relationships.

Relationships

Parent-child relationships are also a case where things are vastly more complicated than just the one-to-many or one-to-one (or two-to-one) that direct object references encourage; in the case of families, given how complex the modern American family can get (and frankly, it’s not any easier if we go back and look at medieval families, either—go have a look at any royal European genealogical line and think about how you’d model that, particularly Henry VIII), it becomes pretty quickly apparent that modeling the relationships themselves often presents itself as the only reasonable solution.

I won’t even begin to get into that example, by the way, simply because this blog post is too long as it is. I might try it for a later blog post to explore the idea further, but I think the point is made at this point.

Summary

The object-oriented paradigm often finds itself wading in tens of thousands of types, so it seems counterintuitive to suggest that we need more of them to make programs more clear. I agree, many O-O programs are too type-heavy, but part of the problem there is that we’re spending too much time creating classes that we shouldn’t need to create (DTOs and the like) and not enough time thinking about the actual entities in the system.

I’ll be the first to admit, too, that not all systems will need to treat names the way that I’ve done—sometimes an age is just an integer, and we’re OK with that. Truthfully, though, it seems more often than not that we’re later adding the necessary code to ensure that ages can never be negative, have to fall within a certain range, and so on.

As a suggestion, then, I throw out this idea: Ensure that all of your domain classes never expose primitive types to the user of the system. In other words, Name never exposes an “int” for Age, but only an “Age” type. C# makes this easy via “using” declarations, like so:

using FirstName = System.String;
using LastName = System.String;

which can then, if you’re thorough and disciplined about using the FirstName and LastName types instead of “string”, evolve into fully-formed types later in their own right if they need to. C++ provides “typedef” for this purpose—unfortunately, Java lacks any such facility, making this a much harder prospect. (This is something I’d stick at the top of my TODO list were I nominated to take Brian Goetz’s place at the head of Java9 development.)

In essence, encapsulate the primitive types away so that when they don’t need to be primitives, or when they need to be more complex than just simple holders of data, they don’t have to be, and clients will never know the difference. That, folks, is what encapsulation is trying to be about.


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Friday, April 26, 2013 5:59:12 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Saturday, April 13, 2013
Say that part about HTML standards, again?

In incarnations past, I have had debates, public and otherwise, with friends and colleagues who have asserted that HTML5 (by which we really mean HTML5/JavaScript/CSS3) will essentially become the platform of choice for all applications going forward—that essentially, this time, standards will win out, and companies that try to subvert the open nature of the web by creating their own implementations with their own extensions and proprietary features that aren’t part of the standards, lose.

Then, I read the Wired news post about Google’s departure from WebKit, and I’m a little surprised that the Internet (and by “the Internet”, I mean “the very people who get up in arms about standards and subverting them and blah blah blah”) hasn’t taken more issues with some of the things cited therein:

Google’s decision is in tune with its overall efforts to improve the infrastructure of the internet. When it comes to browser software and other web technologies that directly effect the how quickly and effectively your machine grabs and displays webpages, the company likes to use open source technologies. That way, it can feed their adoption outside the company — and ultimately improve the delivery of its many online services (including all important advertisements). But if it believes the rest of the web is moving too slowly, it has no problem starting up its own project.

Just to be clear, Google is happy to use open-source technologies, so it can feed adoption of those technologies, but if it’s something that Google thinks is being adopted too slowly—like, say, Google’s extensions to the various standards that aren’t being picked up by its competitors—then Google feels the need to kick off its own thing. Interesting.

… [T]he trouble with WebKit is that is used different “multi-process architecture” than its Chrome browser, which basically means it didn’t handle concurrent tasks in the same way. When Chrome was first released in 2008 WebKit didn’t have a multi-process architecture, so Google had to build its own. WebKit2, released in 2010, adds multi-process features, but is quite different from what Google had already built. Apple and Google don’t see eye to eye on the project, and it became too difficult and too time-consuming for the company juggle the two architectures. “Supporting multiple architectures over the years has led to increasing complexity for both [projects],” the post says. “This has slowed down the collective pace of innovation.”

So… Google tried to use some open-source software, but discovered that the project didn’t work the way they built the rest of their application to work. (I’m certain that’s the first time that has happened, ever.) When the custodians of the project did add the feature Google wanted, the feature was implemented in a manner that still wasn’t in lockstep with the way Google wanted things to work in their application. This meant that “innovation” is “slowed down”.

(As an aside, I find it fascinating that whenever a company adopts open-source, it’s to “foster interoperability and open standards”, but when they abandon open-source, it’s to “foster innovation and faster evolution”. And I’m sure it’s entirely accidental that most of the time, adopting “open standards” is usually when the company is way behind on the technology curve for a given thing, and adopting “faster innovation” is usually when that same company thinks they’ve caught up the distance or surged ahead of their competitors in that space.)

Of course, a new implementation has its risks of bugs and incompatibilities, but Google has a plan for that:

“Throughout this transition, we’ll collaborate closely with other browser vendors to move the web forward and preserve the compatibility that made it a successful ecosystem,” the announcement reads.

Ah, there. See? By collaborating closely with their competitors, they will preserve compatibility. Because when Microsoft did that, everybody was totally OK with that…. uh, and… yeah… it worked pretty well, too, and….

Look, it seems pretty reasonable to assume that even if the tags and the DOM and the APIs are all 100% unchanged from Chrome v.Past to v.Next, there’s still going to be places where they optimize differently than WebKit does, which means now that developers will need to learn (and implement) optimizations in their Web-based applications differently. And frankly, the assumption that Chrome’s Blink and WebKit will somehow be bug-for-bug compatible/identical with each other is a pretty steep bar to accept blindly, considering the history.

Once again, we see the cycle coming around: in the beginning, when a technology is fleshing out, companies yearn for standards in order to create adoption. After a certain tipping point of adoption, however, the major players start to seek ways to avoid becoming a commodity, and start introducing “extensions” and “innovations” that for some odd reason their competitors in the standards meetings don’t seem all that inclined to adopt. That’s when they start forking and shying away from staying true to the standard, and eventually, the standard becomes either a least-common-denominator… or a joke.

Anybody want to bet on which outcome emerges for HTML5?

(Before you reach for the “Comment” link to flame me all to Hell, yes, even an HTML 5 standard that is 80% consistent across all the browsers is still pretty damn useful—just as a SQL standard that is 80% consistent across all the databases is useful. But this is a far cry from the utopia of interconnectedness and interoperability that was promised to us by the HTMLophiles, and it simply demonstrates that the Circle of TechnoLife continues, unabated, as it has ever since PC manufacturers—and the rest of us watching them--discovered what happens to them when they become a commodity.)


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Saturday, April 13, 2013 1:30:45 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Programming language "laws"

As is pretty typical for that site, Lambda the Ultimate has a great discussion on some insights that the creators of Mozart and Oz have come to, regarding the design of programming languages; I repeat the post here for convenience:

Now that we are close to releasing Mozart 2 (a complete redesign of the Mozart system), I have been thinking about how best to summarize the lessons we learned about programming paradigms in CTM. Here are five "laws" that summarize these lessons:
  1. A well-designed program uses the right concepts, and the paradigm follows from the concepts that are used. [Paradigms are epiphenomena]
  2. A paradigm with more concepts than another is not better or worse, just different. [Paradigm paradox]
  3. Each problem has a best paradigm in which to program it; a paradigm with less concepts makes the program more complicated and a paradigm with more concepts makes reasoning more complicated. [Best paradigm principle]
  4. If a program is complicated for reasons unrelated to the problem being solved, then a new concept should be added to the paradigm. [Creative extension principle]
  5. A program's interface should depend only on its externally visible functionality, not on the paradigm used to implement it. [Model independence principle]
Here a "paradigm" is defined as a formal system that defines how computations are done and that leads to a set of techniques for programming and reasoning about programs. Some commonly used paradigms are called functional programming, object-oriented programming, and logic programming. The term "best paradigm" can have different meanings depending on the ultimate goal of the programming project; it usually refers to a paradigm that maximizes some combination of good properties such as clarity, provability, maintainability, efficiency, and extensibility. I am curious to see what the LtU community thinks of these laws and their formulation.
This just so neatly calls out to me, based on my own very brief and very informal investigation into multi-paradigm programming (based on James Coplien's work from C++ from a decade-plus ago). I think they really have something interesting here.


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Tuesday, March 19, 2013 6:32:43 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Monday, March 18, 2013
Ted Neward on Java 8 adoption

Every once in a while, there is a moment in your life when inspiration just BAM! strikes out of nowhere, telling you what your next blog post is.

Then, there’s this one.

This blog post wasn’t inspired by any sort of bolt from the blue, or even a conversation with a buddy that led me to think, “Yeah, this is something that I should share with the world”. No, this one comes directly to you, from you. You see, I was cruising through my blog logs, and in particular looking at the Google Search queries that led to the blog site, and yesterday apparently two different Google Searches, both titled “Ted Neward on Java 8 adoption”, came in twice each.

I take that as a sign that y’all are kinda curious what my thoughts on Java 8 adoption are. Consider the message received: from your fingers to my eyes, as the old saying (slightly rephrased) goes.

Java 8: Overview

For those of you who’ve been too busy to track what’s going on with the Java language recently, the upcoming release of the JDK, the JavaSE 8 release, marks a fairly significant moment in Java’s history, one that ranks right up there with Java 5, in that the language is going to get a significant “bump” in functionality. Historically, Sun tried very hard to avoid such changes: Java 1.1 introduced inner classes, Java 1.4 introduced “assert”, and beyond that the language was the same language we’d been using since 1996 or so. The JVM saw some huge growth, by leaps and bounds, and the Java libraries grew exponentially, it seemed, but the language itself remained pretty static until Java 5. With Java 5 we got generics, enumerations, annotations, enhanced for loops, variable argument declarations, and a few other things besides; with Java 7 (the last release) we got a couple of trivial changes that really didn’t ruffle anybody’s hair, much less blow anybody’s socks off.

Java 8 represents another Java 5-like “sea change” kind of release. Not because there’s a ton of new features, like Java 5 had, but because the introduction of lambdas—anonymous function literals—will change a lot of the ways we can express concepts in Java, and that’s going to ripple throughout the language and the ecosystem. (Well, over time, it will—it’s hard to say exactly how much things will change in the days and months immediately following 8’s release.)

I won’t go into the details of Java 8’s new syntax—that’s not only still being finalized, but it’s also been pretty well-documented and discussed elsewhere (including a forthcoming Java Magazine issue from Oracle TechNet on the subject that’s been written by yours truly), and I only have a few minutes to write this in between flights home from a conference, to boot. For those who are familiar with lambdas, suffice to say that Java lambdas will look astonishingly like Scala or C# lambdas, partly because there’s really only a few ways you can make lambdas look in a C-style language, and partly because the folks writing the new features want the syntax to look familiar to programmers, and borrowing somebody else’s syntax (or at least big chunks of it) is a good way to do that.

Java 8: Adoption

When we talk about “adoption” of a given Java release, there’s a couple of different concepts we should tease out and examine individually: those customers who will deploy their non-Java8-written code on top of the Java8 JVM; those customers who will start using libraries written using Java8 features; and those customers who will start writing their own designs and implementations in the Java8 syntax and style.

Customers deploying Java8 for the JVM. Frankly, I expect this to happen relatively quickly, in line with the Java releases before this one. The JVM gets better and better with each release, and there’s no reason to assume that this release will be any different, and once Oracle and the JVM itself have demonstrated that there’s little to no risk to dropping the new JVM into the production data center and firing up your current version of JBoss or Tomcat or whatever on top of it, customers will begin to take a hard look at the risks involved in doing so (if any) and make that transition. It’s really a high-win-low-cost thing to do, again, once the Java8 JVM has some actual production miles under its belt, so to speak. (This isn’t a new rewrite of the JVM, by the way—customers just don’t want to be the first one to discover stupid bugs. My Dad once summarized this attitude this way: “Pilots never want to the fly the ‘A’ model of any aircraft.”) I give it about a year, maybe as early as six months, after the Java8 release before customers start putting Java8 into production.

Customers using libraries written using Java8 features. And let’s be clear, by “Java8 features” we’re talking about lambdas and virtual extension methods (a.k.a. “defender methods” from earlier draft specs), and by “libraries”, we’re talking about major open-source favorites like Spring, Hibernate, Commons Collections and so on. Essentially, the reason this is important as a category centers around the idea that Java developers, like a lot of developers, aren’t going to adopt the language features of the new Java until they see them in action—passing lambdas in to Spring for executing inside a database transaction, for example, or passing a lambda in to a collection for execution across a collection. The timeline here will be somewhat dependent on the library, and on the commitment of the developers around those libraries, but I’m a little less optimistic here—many of the open-source committers have historically been the loudest to cry foul over some of the changes Sun made to the language, and I’m not convinced yet that they have come around to embrace Oracle’s intentions regarding the language’s evolution. (In many ways, the image that strikes me is that of a large number of grumpy old men sitting around the office, gruffly tossing off one-liners like “Didn’t work like that in MY day” and “Don’t these kids realize that sometimes the old ways are the best ways?”.) I’m guessing that this transition will take longer, like two years at the minimum, and some libraries will never actually make the transition at all, choosing instead to remain “pre-Java8 compatible”, in the same way that some libraries chose to remain “pre-Java5 compatible” (and, IMHO, essentially put themselves out to pasture as a result).

Customers writing their own designs and implementations in Java8. And really, what I mean here is “how long before they start creating classes that utilize lambdas in the domain object design”? Interestingly enough, I think this is tangentially related to how quickly the open-source community adopts Java8 (the previous point), because then customers will begin to see some design patterns and idioms that they can copy/follow/embrace/extend, but even if the open-source community roundly rejects Java8, I still see customers starting to design and build code using lambdas by 2015 or ‘16. Some will jump on it early, or be able to transition their existing anonymous-inner-class-based (that is, “poor man’s lambda”) code over to lambdas within months of Java8’s release, but it will take longer to percolate through the rest of the industry—there are more than a few companies out there still running Java6, for example, and those folks aren’t going to accelerate their use of Java8 just to get lambdas.

Java 8: Perception

Having said all that, though, I think the overall perception of Java8’s adoption will be entirely dependent on how well Oracle addresses some of the recent “security flaws” that have been coming out of Java in the press. Even though the security flaws all seem to be applet- or client-side Java related, the perception that Java is somehow insecure likely has Microsoft chuckling internally—it certainly has Microsoft’s community (of which I and a number of my friends are a part) giggling and roaring and engaging in a few “Neener-neener-neener” moments; after all the crap that Java guys gave the Microsoft community back in the days of Bill Gates’ famous Security Memo, I can’t say that it’s unwarranted.

Aside from that, though, I think there’s no real reason not to expect adoption of Java8 to follow the same broad strokes path that previous Java releases have enjoyed, and thus within three years I fully expect that widescale adoption will be well under way.


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Monday, March 18, 2013 6:46:36 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Tuesday, February 26, 2013
"We Accept Pull Requests"

There are times when the industry in which I find myself does things that I just don't understand.

Consider, for a moment, this blog by Jeff Handley, in which he essentially says that the phrase "We accept pull requests" is "cringe-inducing":

Why do the words “we accept pull requests” have such a stigma? Why were they cringe-inducing when I spoke them? Because too many OSS projects use these words as an easy way to shut people up. We (the collective of OSS project owners) can too easily jump to this phrase when we don’t want to do something ourselves. If we don’t see the value in a feature, but the requester persists, we can simply utter, “We accept pull requests,” and drop it until the end of days or when a pull request is submitted, whichever comes first. The phrase now basically means, “Buzz off!”
OK, I admit that I'm somewhat removed from the OSS community--I don't have any particular dogs in that race, as the old saying goes--and the idea that "We accept pull requests" is a "Buzz off!" phrase is news to me. But I understand what Jeff is saying: a phrase has taken on a meaning of its own, and as is often the case, it's a meaning that's contrary to its stated one:
At Microsoft, having open source projects that actually accept pull requests is a fairly new concept. I work on NuGet, which is an Outercurve project that accepts contributions from Microsoft and many others. I was the dev lead for Razor and Web Pages at the time it went open source through Microsoft Open Tech. I collaborate with teams that work on EntityFramework, SignalR, MVC, and several other open source projects. I spend virtually all my time thinking about projects that are open source. Just a few years ago, this was unimaginable at Microsoft. Sometimes I feel like it still hasn’t sunk in how awesome it is that we have gotten to where we are, and I think I’ve been trigger happy and I’ve said “We accept pull requests” too often I typically use the phrase in jest, but I admit that I have said it when I was really thinking “Buzz off!”
Honestly, I've heard the same kind of thing from the mouths of Microsoft developers during Software Development Reviews (SDRs), in the form of the phrase "Thank you for your feedback"--it's usually at the end of a fervent discussion when one of the reviewers is commenting on a feature being done (or not being done) and the team is in some kind of disagreement about the feature's relative importance or the implementation used. It's usually uttered in a manner that gives the crowd a very clear intent: "You can stop talking now, because I've stopped listening."
The weekend after the MVP summit, I was still regretting having said what I said. I wished all week I could take the words back. And then I saw someone else fall victim. On a highly controversial NuGet issue, the infamous Phil Haack used a similar phrase as part of a response stating that the core team probably wouldn’t be taking action on the proposed changes, but that there was nothing stopping those affected from issuing a pull request. With my mistake still fresh in my mind, I read Phil’s words just as I’m sure everyone in the room at the MVP summit heard my own. It sounded flippant and it had the opposite effect from what Phil intended or what I would want people thinking of the NuGet core team. From there, the thread started turning nasty. We were stuck arguing opinions and we were no longer discussing the actual issue and how it could be solved.
As Jeff goes on to mention, I got involved in that Twitter conversation, along with a number of others, and as he says, the conversation moved on to JabbR, but without me--I bailed on it for a couple of reasons. Phil proposed a resolution to the problem, though, that seemed to satisfy at least a few folks:
With that many mentions on the tweets, we ran out of characters and eventually moved into JabbR. By the end of the conversation, we all agreed that the words “we accept pull requests” should never be used again. Phil proposed a great phrase to use instead: “Want to take a crack at it? We’ll help.”
But frankly, I don't care for this phraseology. Yes, I understand the intent--the owners of open-source projects shouldn't brush off people's suggestions about things to do with the project in the future and shouldn't reach for a handy phrase that will essentially serve the purpose of saying "Buzz off". And keeping an open ear to your community is a good thing, yes.

What I don't like about the new phrase is twofold. First, if people use the phrase casually enough, eventually it too will be overused and interpreted to mean "Buzz off!", just as "Thank you for your feedback" became. But secondly, where in the world did it somehow become a law that open source projects MUST implement every feature that their users suggest? This is part of the strange economics of open source--in a commercial product, if the developers stray too far away from what customers need or want, declining sales will serve as a corrective force to bring them back around (or, if they don't, bankruptcy of either the product or the company will eventually follow). But in an open-source project, there's no real visible marker to serve as that accountability and feedback--and so the project owners, those who want to try and stay in tune with their users anyway, feel a deeper responsibility to respond to user requests. And on its own, that's a good thing.

The part that bothers me, though, is that this new phraseology essentially implies that any open-source project has a responsibility to implement the features that its users ask for, and frankly, that's not sustainable. Open-source projects are, for the most part, maintained by volunteers, but even those that are backed by commercial firms (like Microsoft or GitHub) have finite resources--they simply cannot commit resources, even just "help", to every feature request that any user makes of them. This is why the "We accept pull requests" was always, to my mind, an acceptable response: loosely translated, to me at least, it meant, "Look, that's an interesting idea, but it either isn't on our immediate roadmap, or it takes the project in a different direction than we'd intended, or we're not even entirely sure that it's feasible or doable or easily managed or what-have-you. Why don't you take a stab at implementing it in your own fork of the code, and if you can get it to some point of implementation that you can show us, send us a copy of the code in the form of a pull request so we can take a look and see if it fits with how we see the project going." This is not an unreasonable response: if you care passionately about this feature, either because you think it should be there or because your company needs that feature to get its work done, then you have the time, energy and motivation to at least take a first pass at it and prove the concept (or, sometimes, prove to yourself that it's not such an easy request as you thought). Cultivating a sense of entitlement in your users is not a good practice--it's a step towards a completely unsustainable model that could, if not curbed, eventually lead to the death of the project as the maintainers essentially give up when faced with feature request after feature request.

I applaud the efforts on the part of project maintainers, particularly those at large commercial corporations involved in open source, to avoid "Buzz off" phrases. But it's not OK for project maintainers to feel like they are under a responsibility to implement any particular feature or idea suggested by a user. Some ideas are going to be good ones, some are going to be just "off the radar" of the project's core committers, and some are going to be just plain bad. You think your idea is one of those? Take a stab at it. Write the code. And if you've got it to a point where it seems to be working, then submit a pull request.

But please, let's not blow this out of proportion. Users need to cut the people who give them software for free some slack.

(EDIT: I accidentally referred to Jeff as "Anthony" in one place and "Andrew" in another. Not really sure how or why, but... Edited.)


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Tuesday, February 26, 2013 1:52:45 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Thursday, February 21, 2013
Java was not the first

Charlie Kindel blogs that he thinks James Gosling (and the rest of Sun) screwed us all with Java and it's "Write Once, Run Anywhere" mantra. It's catchy, but it's wrong.

Like a lot of Charlie's blogs, he nails parts of this one squarely on the head:

WORA was, is, and always will be, a fallacy. ... It is the “Write once…“ part that’s the most dangerous. We all wish the world was rainbows and unicorns, and “Write once…” implies that there is a world where you can actually write an app once and it will run on all devices. But this is precisely the fantasy that the platform vendors will never allow to become reality. ...
And, given his current focus on building a mobile startup, he of course takes this lesson directly into the "native mobile app vs HTML 5 app" discussion that I've been a part of on way too many speaker panels and conference BOFs and keynotes and such:
HTML5 is awesome in many ways. If applied judiciously, it can be a great technology and tool. As a tool, it can absolutely be used to reduce the amount of platform specific code you have to write. But it is not a starting place. Starting with HTML5 is the most customer unfriendly thing a developer can do. ... Like many ‘solutions’ in our industry the “Hey, write it once in in HTML5 and it will run anywhere” story didn’t actually start with the end-user customer. It started with idealistic thoughts about technology. It was then turned into snake oil for developers. Not only is the “build a mobile app that hosts a web view that contains HTML5″ approach bass-ackwards, it is a recipe for execution disaster. Yes, there are examples of teams that have built great apps using this technique, but if you actually look at what they did, they focused on their experience first and then made the technology work. What happens when the shop starts with “we gotta use HTML5 running in a UIWebView” is initial euphoria over productivity, followed by incredible pain doing the final 20%.
And he's flat-out right about this: HTML 5, as an application development technology, takes you about 60 - 80% of the way home, depending on what you want your application to do.

In fact, about the only part of Charlie's blog post that I disagree with is the part where he blames Gosling and Java:

I blame James Gosling. He foisted Java on us and as a result Sun coined the term Write Once Run Anywhere. ... Developers really want to believe it is possible to “Write once…”. They also really want to believe that more threads will help. But we all know they just make the problems worse. Just as we’ve all grown to accept that starting with “make it multi-threaded” is evil, we need to accept “Write once…” is evil.
It didn't start with Java--it started well before that, with a set of cross-platform C++ toolkits that promised the same kind of promise: write your application in platform-standard C++ to our API, and we'll have the libraries on all the major platforms (back in those days, it was Windows, Mac OS, Solaris OpenView, OSF/Motif, and a few others) and it will just work. Even Microsoft got into this game briefly (I worked at Intuit, and helped a consultant who was struggling to port QuickBooks, I think it was, over to the Mac using Microsoft's short-lived "MFC For Mac OS" release), And, even before that, we had the discussions of "Standard C" and the #ifdef tricks we used to play to struggle to get one source file to compile on all the different platforms that C runs on.

And that, folks, is the heart of the matter: long before Gosling took his fledgling failed set-top box Oak-named project and looked around for a space to which to apply it next, developers... no, let's get that right, "developers and their managers who hate the idea of violating DRY by having the code in umpteen different codebases" have been looking for ways to have a single source base that runs across all the platforms. We've tried it with portable languages (see C, C++, Java, for starters), portable libraries (in the C++ space see Zinc, zApp, XVT, Tools.h++), portable containers (see EJB, the web browser), and now portable platforms (see PhoneGap/Cordova, Titanium, etc), portable cross-compilers (see MonoTouch/MonoDroid, for recent examples), and I'm sure there will be other efforts along these lines for years and decades to come. It's a noble goal, but the major players in the space to which we are targeting--whether that be operating systems, browsers, mobile platforms, console game devices, or whatever comes next two decades from now--will not allow their systems to be commoditized that easily. Because at the heart of it, that's exactly what these "cross-platform" tools and languages and libraries are trying to do: reduce the underlying "thing" to a commodity that lacks interest or impact.

Interestingly enough, as a side-note, one thing I'm starting to notice is that the more pervasive mobile devices become and the more mobile applications we see reaching those devices, the less and less "device-standard" those interfaces are trying to look even as they try to achieve cross-platform similarities. Consider, for a moment, the Fly Delta app on iPhone: it doesn't really use any of the standard iOS UI metaphors (except for some of the basic ones), largely because they've defined their own look-and-feel across all the platforms they support (iOS and Android, at least so far). Ditto for the CNN and USA Today apps, as well as the ESPN app, and of course just about every game ever written for any of those platforms. So even as Charlie argues:

The problem is each major platform has its own UI model, its own model for how a web view is hosted, its own HTML rendering engine, and its own JavaScript engine. These inter-platform differences mean that not only is the platform-specific code unique, but the interactions between that code and the code running within the web view becomes device specific. And to make matters worse intra-platform fragmentation, particularly on the platform with the largest number of users, Android, is so bad that this “Write Once..” approach provides no help.
We are starting to see mobile app developers actually striving to define their own UI model entirely, with only passing nod to the standards of the device on which they're running. Which then makes me wonder if we're going to start to see new portable toolkits that define their own unique UI model on each of these platforms, or will somehow allow developers to define their own UI model on each of these platforms--a UI model toolkit, so to speak. Which would be an interesting development, but one that will eventually run into many of the same problems as the others did.


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Thursday, February 21, 2013 4:08:04 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Comments [6]  | 
 Thursday, February 14, 2013
Um... Security risk much?

While cruising through the Internet a few minute ago, I wandered across Meteor, which looks like a really cool tool/system/platform/whatever for building modern web applications. JavaScript on the front, JavaScript on the back, Mongo backing, it's definitely something worth looking into, IMHO.

Thus emboldened, I decide to look at how to start playing with it, and lo and behold I discover that the instructions for installation are:

curl https://install.meteor.com | sh
Um.... Wat?

Now, I'm sure the Meteor folks are all nice people, and they're making sure (via the use of the https URL) that whatever is piped into my shell is, in fact, coming from their servers, but I don't know these people from Adam or Eve, and that's taking an awfully big risk on my part, just letting them pipe whatever-the-hell-they-want into a shell Terminal. Hell, you don't even need root access to fill my hard drive with whatever random bits of goo you wanted.

I looked at the shell script, and it's all OK, mind you--the Meteor people definitely look trustworthy, I want to reassure anyone of that. But I'm really, really hoping that this is NOT their preferred mechanism for delivery... nor is it anyone's preferred mechanism for delivery... because that's got a gaping security hole in it about twelve miles wide. It's just begging for some random evil hacker to post a website saying, "Hey, all, I've got his really cool framework y'all should try..." and bury the malware inside the code somewhere.

Which leads to today's Random Thought Experiment of the Day: How long would it take the open source community to discover malware buried inside of an open-source package, particularly one that's in widespread use, a la Apache or Tomcat or JBoss? (Assume all the core committers were in on it--how many people, aside from the core committers, actually look at the source of the packages we download and install, sometimes under root permissions?)

Not saying we should abandon open source; just saying we should be responsible citizens about who we let in our front door.

UPDATE: Having done the install, I realize that it's a two-step download... the shell script just figures out which OS you're on, which tool (curl or wget) to use, and asks you for root access to download and install the actual distribution. Which, honestly, I didn't look at. So, here's hoping the Meteor folks are as good as I'm assuming them to be....

Still highlights that this is a huge security risk.


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Thursday, February 14, 2013 8:25:38 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Comments [4]  | 
 Friday, January 25, 2013
More on "Craftsmanship"

TL;DR: To all those who dissented, you're right, but you're wrong. Craftsmanship is a noble meme, when it's something that somebody holds as a personal goal, but it's often coming across as a way to beat up and denigrate on others who don't choose to invest significant time and energy into programming. The Zen Masters didn't walk around the countryside, proclaiming "I am a Zen Master!"

Wow. Apparently I touched a nerve.

It's been 48 hours since I posted On the Dark Side of 'Craftsmanship', and it's gotten a ton of interest, as well as a few syndicated re-posts (DZone and a few others). Comments to the blog included a response from Dave Thomas, other blog posts have been brought to my attention, and Twitter was on FIRE with people pinging me with their thoughts, which turn out to be across the spectrum, approving and dissenting. Not at all what I really expected to happen, to be honest--I kinda thought it would get lost in the noise of others commenting around the whole thing.

But for whatever reason, it's gotten a lot of attention, so I feel a certain responsibility to respond and explain to some of the dissenters who've responded. Not to defend, per se, but to at least demonstrate some recognition and attempt to clarify my position where I think it's gotten mis-heard. (To those who approved of the message, thank you for your support, and I'm happy to have vocalized something you felt unable, unwilling, unheard, or too busy to vocalize yourself. I hope my explanations here continue to represent your opinions, but if not, please feel free to let me know.)

A lot of the opinions centered around a few core ideas, it seems, so let me try and respond to those first.

You're confusing "craftsmanship" with a few people behaving badly. That may well be, but those who behaved badly included at least one who holds himself up as a leader of the craftsman movement and has held his actions up as indications of how "craftsmen" should behave. When you do this, you invite this kind of criticism and association. So if the movement is being given a black eye because of the actions of a single individual, well, now you know how a bunch of moderate Republicans feel about Paul Ryan.

Corey is a nice guy, he apologized, don't crucify him. Of course he is. Corey is a nice guy--and, speaking well to his character, he apologized almost immediately when it all broke. I learned a long time ago that "true sorry" means you (a) apologize for your actions, (b) seek to remedy the damage your actions have caused ("make it right", in other words), and (c) avoid making the same mistake in the future. From a distance, it seems like he feels contrition, and has publicly apologized for his actions. I would hope he's reached out to Heather directly to try and make things right with her, but that's between the two of them. Whether he avoids this kind of activity in the future remains to be seen. I think he will, but that's because I think he's learned a harsh lesson about being in the spotlight--it tends to be a harsh place to be. The rest of this really isn't about Corey and Heather anymore, so as far as I'm concerned, that thread complete.

You misunderstand the nature of "craftsmanship". Actually, no, I don't. At its heart, the original intent of "craftsmanship" was a constant striving to be better about what you do, and taking pride in the things that you do. It's related to the Japanese code of the samurai (kaizen) that says, in essence, that we are constantly striving to get better. The samurai sought to become better swordsmen, constantly challenging each other to prove the mettle against one another, improving their skills and, conditioning, but also their honor, by how they treated each other, their lord, their servants, and those they sought to protect. Kanban is a wonderful code, and one I have tried to live my entire life, even before I'd discovered it. Please don't assume that I misunderstand the teachings of your movement just because I don't go to the meetings.

Why you pick on "craftsmanship", anyway? If I want to take pride in what I do, what difference does it make? This is me paraphrasing on much of the dissent, and my response boils down to two basic thoughts:

  1. If you think your movement is "just about yourself", why invent a label to differentiate yourself from the rest?
  2. If you invent a label, it becomes almost automatic to draw a line between "us" and "them", and that in of itself almost automatically leads to "us vs them" behavior and mentality.
Look, I view this whole thing as kind of like religion: whatever you want to do behind closed doors, that's your business. But when you start waving it in other peoples' faces, then I have a problem with it. You want to spend time on the weekends improving your skills, go for it. You want to spend time at night learning a bunch of programming languages so you can improve your code and your ability to design systems, go for it. You want to study psychology and philosophy so you can understand other people better when it comes time to interact with them, go for it. And hey, you want to put some code up somewhere so people can point to it and help you get it better, go for it. But when you start waving all that time and dedication in my face, you're either doing it because you want recognition, or you want to suggest that I'm somehow not as good as you. Live the virtuous life, don't brag about it.

There were some specific blogs and comments that I think deserve discusson, too:

Dave Thomas was kind enough to comment on my blog:

I remember the farmer comment :) I think I said 30%, but I stand by what I said. And it isn't really an elitist stance. Instead, I feel that programming is hard work. At the end of a day of coding, I'm tired. And so I believe that if you are asking someone to do programming, then it is in both your and their interest that they are doing something they enjoy. Because if they don't enjoy it, then they are truly just a laborer, working hard at something that has no meaning to them. And as you spend 8 hours a day, 5 days a week doing it, that seems like an awful waste of an intelligent person's life.
Sure, programming is hard. So is house painting. They're different kinds of exhaustion, but it's exhaustion all the same. But, frankly, if somebody has chosen to take up a job that they do just because it's a job, that's their choice, and not ours to criticize, in my opinion. (And I remember it as 50%, because I very clearly remember saying the "way to insult half the room" crack after it, but maybe I misheard you. I do know others also heard it at 50%, because an attendee or two came up to talk about it after the panel. At least, that's how I remember it at the time. But the number itself is kinda meaningless, now that I think about it.)
The farming quote was a deliberate attempt at being shocking to make a point. But I still think it is valid. I'd guess that 30% of the developers I meet are not happy in their work. And I think those folks would be happier and more fulfilled doing something else that gave them more satisfaction.
Again, you and I are both in agreement, that people should be doing what they love, but that's a personal judgment that each person is permitted to make for themselves. There are aspects of our lives that we don't love, but we do because they make other people happy (Juliet and Charlotte driving the boys around to their various activities comes to mind, for example), and it is not our position to judge how others choose for themselves, IMHO.
No one should have to be a laborer.
And here, you and I will disagree quite fundamentally: as I believe it was Martin Luther King, Jr, who said, "If you are going to be a janitor, be the best janitor you know how to be." It seems by that statement that you are saying that people who labor with their bodies rather than your minds (and trust me, you may not be a laborer anymore, big publishing magnate that you are, but I know I sure still am) are somehow less well-off than those who have other people working for them. Some people don't want the responsibility of being the boss, or the owner. See the story of the mexican fisherman at the end of this blog.

Nate commented:

You have a logical fallacy by lumping together the people that derided Heather's code and people that are involved in software craftmanship. It's actually a huge leap of logic to make that connection, and it really retracts from the article.
As I point out later, the people who derided Heather's code were some of the same folks who hold up software craftsmanship. That wasn't me making that up.

Now you realise that you are planting your flag firmly in the 'craftmanship' camp while propelling your position upwards by drawing a line in the sand to define another group of people as 'labourers'. Or in other words attempt to elevate yourself by patronising others with the position you think you are paying them a compliment. Maybe you do not realise this?
No, I realize it, and it's a fair critique, which is why I don't label myself as a "craftsman". I have more to say on this below.
However, have you considered that the craft is not how awesome and perfect you and your code are, but what is applicable for the task at hand. I think most people who you would put into either camp share the same mix of attributes whether good or bad. The important thing is if the solution created does what it is designed to do, is delivered on time for when it is needed and if the environment that the solution has been created for warrants it, that the code is easily understandable by yourself and others (that matter) so it can be developed further over time and maintained.
And the very people who call themselves "craftsmen" criticized a piece of code that, as near as I can tell, met all of those criteria. Hence my reaction that started this whole thing.
I don't wish to judge you, and maybe you are a great, smart guy who does good in the world, but like you I have not researched anything about you, I have simply read your assessment above and come to a conclusion, that's being human I guess.
Oh, people judge each other all the time, and it's high time we stopped beating them up for it. It's human to judge. And while it would be politically correct to say, "You shouldn't judge me before you know me", fact is, of course you're going to do exactly that, because you don't have time to get to know me. And the fact that you don't know me except but through the blog is totally acceptable--you shouldn't have to research me in order to have an opinion. So we're all square on that point. (As to whether I'm a great smart guy who does good in the world, well, that's for others to judge in my opinion, not mine.)
The above just sounds like more of the same 'elitism' that has been ripe in this world from playground to the workplace since the beginning.
It does, doesn't it? And hopefully I clarify the position more clearly later.

In It's OK to love your job, Chad McCallum says that

The basic premise (or at least the one the author start out with) is that because there’s a self-declared group of “software craftspeople”, there is going to be an egotistical divide between those who “get it” and those who don’t.
Like it or not, Chad, that egotistical divide is there. You can "call bullshit" all day long, but look at the reactions that have popped up over this--people feel that divide, and frankly, it's one that's been there for a long, long time. This isn't just me making this up.

Chad also says,

It’s true the feedback that Heather got was unnecessarily negative. And that it came from people who are probably considered “software craftspeople”. That said, correlation doesn’t equal causation. I’m guessing the negative feedback was more because those original offenders had a bad day and needed to vent. And maybe the comments after that one just jumped on the bandwagon because someone with lots of followers and/or respect said it.

These are both things that can and have happened to anyone, regardless of the industry they work in. It’s extremely unfair to associate “someone who’s passionate about software development” to “person who’s waiting to jump on you for your mistakes”.

Unfortunately, Chad, the excuse that "others do it, too" is not an acceptable excuse. If everybody jumped off a cliff, would you do it, too? I understand the rationale--it's extremely hard being the one to go against the herd (I've got the psychological studies I can cite at you that prove it), but that doesn't make it OK or excuse it. Saying "it happens in other industries" is just an extension of that. In other industries, women are still explicitly discriminated against--does that make it OK for us to do that, too?

Chad closes his blog with "Stop calling us egotistical jerks just because we love what we do." To which I respond, "I am happy to do so, as soon as those 'craftsmen' who are acting like one, stop acting like one." If you're not acting like one, then there should be no argument here. If you're trying to tell me that your label is somehow immune to criticism, then I think we just have to agree to disagree.

Paul Pagel (on a site devoted to software craftsmanship, no less) responded as well with his Humble Pursuit of Mastery. He opens with:

I have been reading on blogs and tweets the sentiment that "software craftsmanship is elitism". This perception is formed around comments of code, process, or techniques. I understand a craftsman's earned sense of pride in their work can sometimes be inappropriately communicated.
I don't think I commented on code, process or technique, so I can't be sure if this is directly refuting what I'm saying, but I note that Paul has already touched on the meme he wants to communicate in his last phrase: the craftsman's "earned sense of pride". I have no problem with the work being something that you take pride in; I note, however, that "pride goeth before a fall", and note that, again, Ozymandias was justifiably proud of his accomplishments, too.

Paul then goes through a summation of his career, making sure to smallcaps certain terms with which I have no argument: "sacrifice", "listen", "practicing", "critique" and "teaching". And, in all honesty, these are things that I embrace, as well. But I start getting a little dubious about the sanctity of your terminology, Paul, when it's being used pretty blatantly as an advertising slogan and theme all over the site--if you want the term to remain a Zen-like pursuit, then you need to keep the commercialism out of it, in my opinion, or you invite the kind of criticism that's coming here (explicit or implicit).

Paul's conclusion wraps up with:

Do sacrificing, listening, practice, critiquing, and teaching sound like elitist qualities to you? Software craftsmanship starts out as a humble endeavor moving towards mastery. I won't let 140 or 1000 characters redefine the hours and years spent working hard to become a craftsman. It gave me humility and the confidence to be a professional software developer. Sometimes I let confidence get the better of me, but I know when that happens I am not honoring the spirit of craftsmanship which I was trained.
Humility enough to trademark your phrase "Software is our craft"? Humility enough to call yourself a "driving force" behind software craftsmanship? Don't get me wrong, Paul, there is a certain amount of commercialism that any consultant must adopt in order to survive--but either please don't mix your life-guiding principles with your commercialism, or else don't be surprised when others take aim at your "humility" when you do. It's the same when ministers stand in a multi-million dollar building on a Sunday morning and talk about the parable of the widow giving away her last two coppers--that smacks of hypocrisy.

Finally, Matt van Horn wrote in Crafsmanship, a rebuttal that:

there is an allusion to software craftsmen as being an exclusive group who agre on the “right” tools and techniques. This could not be further from the truth. Anyone who is serious about their craft knows that for every job there are some tools that are better and some that are worse.
... but then he goes right into making that exact mistake:
Now, I may not have a good definition of elegant code, but I definitely know it when I see it – regardless of who wrote it. If you can’t see that
(1..10).each{|i| puts i}

is more elegant than
x = 0
while true do
  x = x + 1
  if x > 10
    break
  end
  puts x
end
then you must near the beginning of your journey towards mastery. Practicing your craft develops your ability to recognize these differences, just as a skilled tailor can more easily spot the difference between a bespoke suit and something from Men’s Wearhouse.
Matt, you kind of make my point for me. What makes it elegant? You take it as self-evident. I don't. As a matter of fact, I've been asking this question for some years now, "What makes code 'elegant', as opposed to 'ugly'? Ironically, Elliott Rusty Harold just blogged about how this style of coding is dangerous in Java, and got crucified for it, but he has the point that functional style (your first example) doesn't JIT as well as the more imperative style right now on the JVM (or on the CLR, from what I can tell). Are you assuming that this will be running on a native Ruby implementation, on JRuby, IronRuby, ...? You have judged the code in the second example based on an intrinsic value system that you may have never questioned. To judge, you have to be able to explain your judgments in terms of the value system. And the fact that you judge without any context, kind of speaks directly to the point I was trying to make: "craftsmen", it seems, have this tendency to judge in absence of context, because they are clearly "further down their journey towards mastery", to use your own metaphor.

Or, to put it much more succinctly, "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder".

Matt then tells me I missed the point of the samurai and tea master story:

inally, he closes with a famous zen story, but he entirely misses the point of it. The story concerns a tea master, and a samurai, who get into a duel. The tea master prevails by bringing the same concentration to the duel that he brings to his tea ceremony. The point that Ted seems to miss here is that the tea master is a craftsman of the highest order. A master of cha-do (the way of tea) is able to transform the simple act of making and pouring a cup of tea into something transcendant by bringing to this simple act a clear mind, a good attitude, and years of patient, humble practice. Arguably he prevails because he has perfected his craft to a higher degree than the samurai has perfected his own. That is why he has earned the right to wear the garb of a samurai, and why he is able to face down his opponent.
Which, again, I find funny, because most Zen masters will tell you that the story--any Zen story, in fact--has no "definitive" meaning, but has meaning based on how you interpret it. (There are a few Zen parables that reinforce this point, but it gets a little meta to justify my understanding of a Zen story by quoting another Zen story.) How Matt chooses to interpret that parable is, of course, up to him. I choose to interpret the story thusly: the insulted samurai felt that his "earned sense of pride" at his sword mastery was insulted by the tea master--clearly no swordsman, as it says in the story--wore robes of a rank and honor that he had not earned. And clearly, the tea master was no swordsman. But what the tea master learned from his peer was not how to use his concentration and discipline to improve his own swordsmanship, but how to demonstrate that he had, in fact, earned a note of mastery through an entirely different discipline than the insulted samurai's. The tea master still has no mastery of the sword, but in his own domain, he is an expert. This was all the insulted samurai needed to see, that the badge of honor had been earned, and not just imposed by a capricious (and disrespectful) lord. Put a paintbrush and canvas into the hands of a house painter, and you get pretty much a mess--but put a spray painter in the hands of Leonardo, and you still get a mess. In fact, to really do the parable justice, we should see how much "craft" Matt can bring when asked to paint a house, because that's about how much relevance swordsmanship and house painting have in relationship to one another. (All analogies fail eventually, by the way, and we're probably reaching the boundaries of this one.)

Billy Hollis is a master with VB, far more than I ever will be; I know C++ far better than he ever will. I respect his abilities, and he, mine. There is no argument here. But more importantly, there are friends I've worked with in the past who are masters with neither VB nor C++, nor any other programming language, but chose instead to sink their time and energy into skiing, pottery, or being a fan of a television show. They chose to put their energies--energies the "craftsmen" seem to say should be put towards their programming--towards things that bring them joy, which happen to not be programming.

Which brings me to another refrain that came up over and over again: You criticize the craftsman, but then you draw a distinction between "craftsman" and "laborer". You're confusing (or confused). First of all, I think it important to disambiguate along two axes: those who are choosing to invest their time into learning to write better software, and those who are choosing to look at writing code as "just" a job as one axis, and along a second axis, the degree to which they have mastered programming. By your own definitions, "craftsmen", can one be early in your mastery of programming and still be a "craftsman"? Can one be a master bowler who's just picked up programming and be considered a "craftsman"? Is the nature of "craftsmanship" a measure of your skill, or is it your dedication to programming, or is it your dedication to something in your life, period? (Remember, the tea master parable says that a master C++ developer will see the master bowler and respect his mastery of bowling, even though he can't code worth a crap. Would you call him a "craftsman"?)

Frankly, I will say, for the record, that I think there are people programming who don't want to put a ton of time and energy into learning how to be better programmers. (I suspect that most of them won't ever read this blog, either.) They see the job as "just a job", and are willing to be taught how to do things, but aren't willing to go off and learn how to do them on their own. They want to do the best job they can, because they, like any human being, want to bring value to the world, but don't have that passion for programming. They want to come in at 9, do their job, and go home at 5. These are those whom I call "laborers". They are the "fisherman" in the following story:

The businessman was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The businessman complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them. The Mexican replied only a little while.

The businessman then asked why he didn't stay out longer and catch more fish? The Mexican said he had enough to support his family's immediate needs. The businessman then asked, but what do you do with the rest of your time? The Mexican fisherman said, "I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take a siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos; I have a full and busy life, señor."

The businessman scoffed, "I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should spend more time fishing and with the proceeds buy a bigger boat. With the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats; eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman, you would sell directly to the processor and eventually open your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then LA and eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise."

The Mexican fisherman asked, "But señor, how long will this all take?" To which the businessman replied, "15-20 years." "But what then, señor?" The businessman laughed and said, "That's the best part! When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would make millions." "Millions, señor? Then what?" The businessman said, "Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take a siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos."

What makes all of this (this particular subject, craftsmanship) particularly hard for me is that I like the message that craftsmanship brings, in terms of how you conduct yourself. I love the book Apprenticeship Patterns, for example, and think that anyone, novice or master, should read this book. I have taken on speaking apprentices in the past, and will continue to do so well into the future. The message that underlies the meme of craftsmanship--the constant striving to improve--is a good one, and I don't want to throw the baby out with the bathwater. If you have adopted "craftsmanship" as a core value of yours, then please, by all means, continue to practice it! Myself, I choose to do so, as well. I have mentored programmers, I have taken speaking apprentices, and I strive to learn more about my craft by branching my studies out well beyond software--I am reading books on management, psychology, building architecture, and business, because I think there is more to software than just the choice of programming language or style.

But be aware that if you start telling people how you're living your life, there is an implicit criticism or expectation that they should be doing that, as well. And when you start criticizing other peoples' code as being "unelegant" or "unbeautiful" or "unclean", you'd better be able to explain your value system and why you judged it as so. Humility is a hard, hard path to tread, and one that I have only recently started to see the outlines of; I am guilty of just about every sin imaginable when it comes to this subject. I have created "elegant" systems that failed their original intent. I have criticized "ugly" code that, in fact, served the purpose well. I have bragged of my own accomplishments to those who accomplished a lot more than I did, or ever will. And I consider it amazing to me that my friends who've been with me since long before I started to eat my justly-deserved humble pie are still with me. (And that those friends are some amazing people in their own right.; if a man is judged by the company he keeps, then by looking around at my friends, I am judged to be a king.) I will continue to strive to be better than I am now, though, even within this discussion right now: those of you who took criticism with my post, you have good points, all of you, and I certainly don't want to stop you from continuing on your journeys of self-discovery, either.

And if we ever cross paths in person, I will buy you a beer so that we can sit down, and we can continue this discussion in person.


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Friday, January 25, 2013 10:24:27 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Comments [7]  | 
 Wednesday, January 23, 2013
On the Dark Side of "Craftsmanship"

I don't know Heather Arthur from Eve. Never met her, never read an article by her, seen a video she's in or shot, or seen her code. Matter of fact, I don't even know that she is a "she"--I'm just guessing from the name.

But apparently she got quite an ugly reaction from a few folks when she open-sourced some code:

So I went to see what people were saying about this project. I searched Twitter and several tweets came up. One of them, I guess the original one, was basically like “hey, this is cool”, but then the rest went like this:
"I cannot even make this stuff up." --@steveklabnik
"Ever wanted to make sed or grep worse?" --@zeeg
"@steveklabnik or just point to the actual code file. eyes bleeding!" --@coreyhaines
At this point, all I know is that by creating this project I’ve done something very wrong. It seemed liked I’d done something fundamentally wrong, so stupid that it flabbergasts someone. So wrong that it doesn’t even need to be explained. And my code is so bad it makes people’s eyes bleed. So of course I start sobbing.
Now, to be fair, Corey later apologized. But I'm still going to criticize the response. Not because Heather's a "she" and we should be more supportive of women in IT. Not because somebody took something they found interesting and put it up on github for anyone to take a look at and use if they found it useful. Not even because it's good code when they said it was bad code or vice versa. (To be honest, I haven't even looked at the code--that's how immaterial it is to my point.)

I'm criticizing because this is what "software craftsmanship" gets us: an imposed segregation of those who "get it" from those who "don't" based on somebody's arbitrary criteria of what we should or shouldn't be doing. And if somebody doesn't use the "right" tools or code it in the "right" way, then bam! You clearly aren't a "craftsman" (or "craftswoman"?) and you clearly don't care about your craft and you clearly aren't worth the time or energy necessary to support and nourish and grow and....

Frankly, I've not been a fan of this movement since its inception. Dave Thomas (Ruby Dave) was on a software panel with me at a No Fluff Just Stuff show about five years ago when we got on to this subject, and Dave said, point blank, "About half of the programmers in the world should just go take up farming." He paused, and in the moment that followed, I said, "Wow, Dave, way to insult half the room." He immediately pointed out that the people in the room were part of the first half, since they were at a conference, but it just sort of underscored to me how high-handed and high-minded that kind of talk and position can be.

Not all of us writing code have to be artists. Frankly, in the world of painting, there are those who will spend hours and days and months, tiny brushes in hand, jars of pigment just one lumens different from one another, laboring over the finest details, creating just one piece... and then there are those who paint houses with paint-sprayers, out of cans of mass-produced "Cream Beige" found at your local Lowes. And you know what? We need both of them.

I will now coin a term that I consider to be the opposite of "software craftsman": the "software laborer". In my younger days, believing myself to be one of those "craftsmen", a developer who knew C++ in and out, who understood memory management and pointers, who could create elegant and useful solutions in templates and classes and inheritance, I turned up my nose at those "laborers" who cranked out one crappy app after another in (what else?) Visual Basic. My app was tight, lean, and well-tuned; their apps were sloppy, bloated, and ugly. My app was a paragon of reused code; their apps were cut-and-paste cobbled-together duct-tape wonders. My app was a shining beacon on a hill for all the world to admire; their apps were mindless drones, slogging through the mud.... Yeah, OK, so you get the idea.

But the funny thing was, those "laborers" were going home at 5 every day. Me, I was staying sometimes until 9pm, wallowing in the wonderment of my code. And, I have to wonder, how much of that was actually not the wonderment of my code, but the wonderment of "me" over the wonderment of "code".

Speaking of, by the way, there appear to be the makings of another such false segregation, in the areas of "functional programming". In defense of Elliott Rusty Harold's blog the other day (which I criticized, and still stand behind, for the reasons I cited there), there are a lot of programmers that are falling into the trap of thinking that "all the cool kids are using functional programming, so if I want to be a cool kid, I have to use functional programming too, even though I'm not sure what I'm doing....". Not all the cool kids are using FP. Some aren't even using OOP. Some are just happily humming along using good ol' fashioned C. And producing some really quality stuff doing so.

See, I have to wonder just how much of the software "craftsmanship" being touted isn't really a narcissistic "Look at me, world! Look at how much better I am because I care about what I do! Look upon my works, ye mighty, and despair!" kind of mentality. Too much of software "craftsmanship" seems to be about the "me" part of "my code". And when I think about why that is, I come to an interesting assertion: That if we take the name away from the code, and just look at the code, we can't really tell what's "elegant" code, what's "hack" code, and what was "elegant hack because there were all these other surrounding constraints outside the code". Without the context, we can't tell.

A few years after my high point as a C++ "craftsman", I was asked to do a short, one-week programming gig/assignment, and the more I looked at it, the more it screamed "VB" at me. And I discovered that what would've taken me probably a month to do in C++ was easily accomplished in a few days in VB. I remember looking at the code, and feeling this sickening, sinking sense of despair at how stupid I must've looked, crowing. VB isn't a bad language--and neither is C++. Or Java. Or C#. Or Groovy, or Scala, or Python, or, heck, just about any language you choose to name. (Except Perl. I refuse to cave on that point. Mostly for comedic effect.)

But more importantly, somebody who comes in at 9, does what they're told, leaves at 5, and never gives a rat's ass about programming except for what they need to know to get their job done, I have respect for them. Yes, some people will want to hold themselves up as "painters", and others will just show up at your house at 8 in the morning with drop cloths. Both have their place in the world. Neither should be denigrated for their choices about how they live their lives or manage their careers. (Yes, there's a question of professional ethics--I want the house painters to make sure they do a good job, too, but quality can come just as easily from the nozzle of a spray painter as it does from the tip of a paintbrush.)

I end this with one of my favorite parables from Japanese lore:

Several centuries ago, a tea master worked in the service of Lord Yamanouchi. No-one else performed the way of the tea to such perfection. The timing and the grace of his every move, from the unfurling of mat, to the setting out of the cups, and the sifting of the green leaves, was beauty itself. His master was so pleased with his servant, that he bestowed upon him the rank and robes of a Samurai warrior.

When Lord Yamanouchi travelled, he always took his tea master with him, so that others could appreciate the perfection of his art. On one occasion, he went on business to the great city of Edo, which we now know as Tokyo.

When evening fell, the tea master and his friends set out to explore the pleasure district, known as the floating world. As they turned the corner of a wooden pavement, they found themselves face to face with two Samurai warriors.

The tea master bowed, and politely step into the gutter to let the fearsome ones pass. But although one warrior went by, the other remained rooted to the spot. He stroked a long black whisker that decorated his face, gnarled by the sun, and scarred by the sword. His eyes pierced through the tea maker’s heart like an arrow.

He did not quite know what to make of the fellow who dressed like a fellow Samurai, yet who would willingly step aside into a gutter. What kind of warrior was this? He looked him up and down. Where were broad shoulders and the thick neck of a man of force and muscle? Instinct told him that this was no soldier. He was an impostor who by ignorance or impudence had donned the uniform of a Samurai. He snarled: “Tell me, oh strange one, where are you from and what is your rank?”

The tea master bowed once more. “It is my honour to serve Lord Yamanouchi and I am his master of the way of the tea.”

“A tea-sprout who dares to wear the robes of Samurai?” exclaimed the rough warrior.

The tea master’s lip trembled. He pressed his hands together and said: “My lord has honoured me with the rank of a Samurai and he requires me to wear these robes. “

The warrior stamped the ground like a raging a bull and exclaimed: “He who wears the robes of a Samurai must fight like a Samurai. I challenge you to a duel. If you die with dignity, you will bring honour to your ancestors. And if you die like a dog, at least you will be no longer insult the rank of the Samurai !”

By now, the hairs on the tea master’s neck were standing on end like the feet of a helpless centipede that has been turned upside down. He imagined he could feel that edge of the Samurai blade against his skin. He thought that his last second on earth had come.

But the corner of the street was no place for a duel with honour. Death is a serious matter, and everything has to be arranged just so. The Samurai’s friend spoke to the tea master’s friends, and gave them the time and the place for the mortal contest.

When the fierce warriors had departed, the tea master’s friends fanned his face and treated his faint nerves with smelling salts. They steadied him as they took him into a nearby place of rest and refreshment. There they assured him that there was no need to fear for his life. Each one of them would give freely of money from his own purse, and they would collect a handsome enough sum to buy the warrior off and make him forget his desire to fight a duel. And if by chance the warrior was not satisfied with the bribe, then surely Lord Yamanouchi would give generously to save his much prized master of the way of the tea.

But these generous words brought no cheer to the tea master. He thought of his family, and his ancestors, and of Lord Yamanouchi himself, and he knew that he must not bring them any reason to be ashamed of him.

“No,” he said with a firmness that surprised his friends. “I have one day and one night to learn how to die with honour, and I will do so.”

And so speaking, he got up and returned alone to the court of Lord Yamanouchi. There he found his equal in rank, the master of fencing, he was skilled as no other in the art of fighting with a sword.

“Master,” he said, when he had explained his tale, “Teach me to die like a Samurai.”

But the master of fencing was a wise man, and he had a great respect for the master of the Tea ceremony. And so he said: “I will teach you all you require, but first, I ask that you perform the way of the Tea for me one last time.”

The tea master could not refuse this request. As he performed the ceremony, all trace of fear seemed to leave his face. He was serenely concentrated on the simple but beautiful cups and pots, and the delicate aroma of the leaves. There was no room in his mind for anxiety. His thoughts were focused on the ritual.

When the ceremony was complete, the fencing master slapped his thigh and exclaimed with pleasure : “There you have it. No need to learn anything of the way of death. Your state of mind when you perform the tea ceremony is all that is required. When you see your challenger tomorrow, imagine that you are about to serve tea for him. Salute him courteously, express regret that you could not meet him sooner, take of your coat and fold it as you did just now. Wrap your head in a silken scarf and and do it with the same serenity as you dress for the tea ritual. Draw your sword, and hold it high above your head. Then close your eyes and ready yourself for combat. “

And that is exactly what the tea master did when, the following morning, at the crack of dawn he met his opponent. The Samurai warrior had been expecting a quivering wreck and he was amazed by the tea master’s presence of mind as he prepared himself for combat. The Samurai’s eyes were opened and he saw a different man altogether. He thought he must have fallen victim to some kind of trick or deception ,and now it was he who feared for his life. The warrior bowed, asked to be excused for his rude behaviour, and left the place of combat with as much speed and dignity as he could muster.

(excerpted from http://storynory.com/2011/03/27/the-samurai-and-the-tea-master/)

My name is Ted Neward. And I bow with respect to the "software laborers" of the world, who churn out quality code without concern for "craftsmanship", because their lives are more than just their code.


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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 9:06:24 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Tuesday, January 01, 2013
Tech Predictions, 2013

Once again, it's time for my annual prognostication and review of last year's efforts. For those of you who've been long-time readers, you know what this means, but for those two or three of you who haven't seen this before, let's set the rules: if I got a prediction right from last year, you take a drink, and if I didn't, you take a drink. (Best. Drinking game. EVAR!)

Let's begin....

Recap: 2012 Predictions

THEN: Lisps will be the languages to watch.

With Clojure leading the way, Lisps (that is, languages that are more or less loosely based on Common Lisp or one of its variants) are slowly clawing their way back into the limelight. Lisps are both functional languages as well as dynamic languages, which gives them a significant reason for interest. Clojure runs on top of the JVM, which makes it highly interoperable with other JVM languages/systems, and Clojure/CLR is the version of Clojure for the CLR platform, though there seems to be less interest in it in the .NET world (which is a mistake, if you ask me).

NOW: Clojure is definitely cementing itself as a "critic's darling" of a language among the digital cognoscenti, but I don't see its uptake increasing--or decreasing. It seems that, like so many critic's darlings, those who like it are using it, and those who aren't have either never heard of it (the far more likely scenario) or don't care for it. Datomic, a NoSQL written by the creator of Clojure (Rich Hickey), is interesting, but I've not heard of many folks taking it up, either. And Clojure/CLR is all but dead, it seems. I score myself a "0" on this one.

THEN: Functional languages will....

I have no idea. As I said above, I'm kind of stymied on the whole functional-language thing and their future. I keep thinking they will either "take off" or "drop off", and they keep tacking to the middle, doing neither, just sort of hanging in there as a concept for programmers to take and run with. Mind you, I like functional languages, and I want to see them become mainstream, or at least more so, but I keep wondering if the mainstream programming public is ready to accept the ideas and concepts hiding therein. So this year, let's try something different: I predict that they will remain exactly where they are, neither "done" nor "accepted", but continue next year to sort of hang out in the middle.

NOW: Functional concepts are slowly making their way into the mainstream of programming topics, but in some cases, programmers seem to be picking-and-choosing which of the functional concepts they believe in. I've heard developers argue vehemently about "lazy values" but go "meh" about lack-of-side-effects, or vice versa. Moreover, it seems that developers are still taking an "object-first, functional-when-I-need-it" kind of approach, which seems a little object-heavy, if you ask me. So, since the concepts seem to be taking some sort of shallow root, I don't know that I get the point for this one, but at the same time, it's not like I was wildly off. So, let's say "0" again.

THEN: F#'s type providers will show up in C# v.Next.

This one is actually a "gimme", if you look across the history of F# and C#: for almost every version of F# v."N", features from that version show up in C# v."N+1". More importantly, F# 3.0's type provider feature is an amazing idea, and one that I think will open up language research in some very interesting ways. (Not sure what F#'s type providers are or what they'll do for you? Check out Don Syme's talk on it at BUILD last year.)

NOW: C# v.Next hasn't been announced yet, so I can't say that this one has come true. We should start hearing some vague rumors out of Redmond soon, though, so maybe 2013 will be the year that C# gets type providers (or some scaled-back version thereof). Again, a "0".

THEN: Windows8 will generate a lot of chatter.

As 2012 progresses, Microsoft will try to force a lot of buzz around it by keeping things under wraps until various points in the year that feel strategic (TechEd, BUILD, etc). In doing so, though, they will annoy a number of people by not talking about them more openly or transparently.

NOW: Oh, my, did they. Windows8 was announced with a bang, but Microsoft (and Sinofsky, who ran the OS division up until recently) decided that they could go it alone and leave critical partners (like Dropbox!) out of the loop entirely. As a result, the Windows8 Store didn't have a lot of apps in it that people (including myself) really expected would be there. And THEN, there was Surface... which took everybody by surprise, as near as I can tell. Totally under wraps. I'm scoring myself "+2" for that one.

THEN: Windows8 ("Metro")-style apps won't impress at first.

The more I think about it, the more I'm becoming convinced that Metro-style apps on a desktop machine are going to collectively underwhelm. The UI simply isn't designed for keyboard-and-mouse kinds of interaction, and that's going to be the hardware setup that most people first experience Windows8 on--contrary to what (I think) Microsoft thinks, people do not just have tablets laying around waiting for Windows 8 to be installed on it, nor are they going to buy a Windows8 tablet just to try it out, at least not until it's gathered some mojo behind it. Microsoft is going to have to finesse the messaging here very, very finely, and that's not something they've shown themselves to be particularly good at over the last half-decade.

NOW: I find myself somewhat at a loss how to score this one--on the one hand, the "used-to-be-called-Metro"-style applications aren't terrible, and I haven't really heard anyone complain about them tremendously, but at the same time, I haven't heard anyone really go wild and ga-ga over them, either. Part of that, I think, is because there just aren't a lot of apps out there for it yet, aside from a rather skimpy selection of games (compared to the iOS App Store and Android Play Store). Again, I think Microsoft really screwed themselves with this one--keeping it all under wraps helped them make a big "Oh, WOW" kind of event buzz within the conference hall when they announced Surface, for example, but that buzz sort of left the room (figuratively) when people started looking for their favorite apps so they could start using that device. (Which, by the way, isn't a bad piece of hardware, I'm finding.) I'll give myself a "+1" for this.

THEN: Scala will get bigger, thanks to Heroku.

With the adoption of Scala and Play for their Java apps, Heroku is going to make Scala look attractive as a development platform, and the adoption of Play by Typesafe (the same people who brought you Akka) means that these four--Heroku, Scala, Play and Akka--will combine into a very compelling and interesting platform. I'm looking forward to seeing what comes of that.

NOW: We're going to get to cloud in a second, but on the whole, Heroku is now starting to make Scala/Play attractive, arguably as attractive as Ruby/Rails is. Play 2.0 unfortunately is not backwards-compatible with Play 1.x modules, which hurts it, but hopefully the Play community brings that back up to speed fairly quickly. "+1"

THEN: Cloud will continue to whip up a lot of air.

For all the hype and money spent on it, it doesn't really seem like cloud is gathering commensurate amounts of traction, across all the various cloud providers with the possible exception of Amazon's cloud system. But, as the different cloud platforms start to diversify their platform technology (Microsoft seems to be leading the way here, ironically, with the introduction of Java, Hadoop and some limited NoSQL bits into their Azure offerings), and as we start to get more experience with the pricing and costs of cloud, 2012 might be the year that we start to see mainstream cloud adoption, beyond "just" the usage patterns we've seen so far (as a backing server for mobile apps and as an easy way to spin up startups).

NOW: It's been whipping up air, all right, but it's starting to look like tornadoes and hurricanes--the talk of 2012 seems to have been more around notable cloud outages instead of notable cloud successes, capped off by a nationwide Netflix outage on Christmas Eve that seemed to dominate my Facebook feed that night. Later analysis suggested that the outage was with Amazon's AWS cloud, on which Netflix resides, and boy, did that make a few heads spin. I suspect we haven't yet (as of this writing) seen the last of that discussion. Overall, it seems like lots of startups and other greenfield apps are being deployed to the cloud, but it seems like corporations are hesitating to pull the trigger on an "all-in" kind of cloud adoption, because of some of the fears surrounding cloud security and now (of all things) robustness. "+1"

THEN: Android tablets will start to gain momentum.

Amazon's Kindle Fire has hit the market strong, definitely better than any other Android-based tablet before it. The Nooq (the Kindle's principal competitor, at least in the e-reader world) is also an Android tablet, which means that right now, consumers can get into the Android tablet world for far, far less than what an iPad costs. Apple rumors suggest that they may have a 7" form factor tablet that will price competitively (in the $200/$300 range), but that's just rumor right now, and Apple has never shown an interest in that form factor, which means the 7" world will remain exclusively Android's (at least for now), and that's a nice form factor for a lot of things. This translates well into more sales of Android tablets in general, I think.

NOW: Google's Nexus 7 came to dominate the discussion of the 7" tablet, until...

THEN: Apple will release an iPad 3, and it will be "more of the same".

Trying to predict Apple is generally a lost cause, particularly when it comes to their vaunted iOS lines, but somewhere around the middle of the year would be ripe for a new iPad, at the very least. (With the iPhone 4S out a few months ago, it's hard to imagine they'd cannibalize those sales by releasing a new iPhone, until the end of the year at the earliest.) Frankly, though, I don't expect the iPad 3 to be all that big of a boost, just a faster processor, more storage, and probably about the same size. Probably the only thing I'd want added to the iPad would be a USB port, but that conflicts with the Apple desire to present the iPad as a "device", rather than as a "computer". (USB ports smack of "computers", not self-contained "devices".)

NOW: ... the iPad Mini. Which, I'd like to point out, is just an iPad in a 7" form factor. (Actually, I think it's a little bit bigger than most 7" tablets--it looks to be a smidge wider than the other 7" tablets I have.) And the "new iPad" (not the iPad 3, which I call a massive FAIL on the part of Apple marketing) is exactly that: same iPad, just faster. And still no USB port on either the iPad or iPad Mini. So between this one and the previous one, I score myself at "+3" across both.

THEN: Apple will get hauled in front of the US government for... something.

Apple's recent foray in the legal world, effectively informing Samsung that they can't make square phones and offering advice as to what will avoid future litigation, smacks of such hubris and arrogance, it makes Microsoft look like a Pollyanna Pushover by comparison. It is pretty much a given, it seems to me, that a confrontation in the legal halls is not far removed, either with the US or with the EU, over anti-cometitive behavior. (And if this kind of behavior continues, and there is no legal action, it'll be pretty apparent that Apple has a pretty good set of US Congressmen and Senators in their pocket, something they probably learned from watching Microsoft and IBM slug it out rather than just buy them off.)

NOW: Congress has started to take a serious look at the patent system and how it's being used by patent trolls (of which, folks, I include Apple these days) to stifle innovation and create this Byzantine system of cross-patent licensing that only benefits the big players, which was exactly what the patent system was designed to avoid. (Patents were supposed to be a way to allow inventors, who are often independents, to avoid getting crushed by bigger, established, well-monetized firms.) Apple hasn't been put squarely in the crosshairs, but the Economist's article on Apple, Google, Microsoft and Amazon in the Dec 11th issue definitely points out that all four are squarely in the sights of governments on both sides of the Atlantic. Still, no points for me.

THEN: IBM will be entirely irrelevant again.

Look, IBM's main contribution to the Java world is/was Eclipse, and to a much lesser degree, Harmony. With Eclipse more or less "done" (aside from all the work on plugins being done by third parties), and with IBM abandoning Harmony in favor of OpenJDK, IBM more or less removes themselves from the game, as far as developers are concerned. Which shouldn't really be surprising--they've been more or less irrelevant pretty much ever since the mid-2000s or so.

NOW: IBM who? Wait, didn't they used to make a really kick-ass laptop, back when we liked using laptops? "+1"

THEN: Oracle will "screw it up" at least once.

Right now, the Java community is poised, like a starving vulture, waiting for Oracle to do something else that demonstrates and befits their Evil Emperor status. The community has already been quick (far too quick, if you ask me) to highlight Oracle's supposed missteps, such as the JVM-crashing bug (which has already been fixed in the _u1 release of Java7, which garnered no attention from the various Java news sites) and the debacle around Hudson/Jenkins/whatever-the-heck-we-need-to-call-it-this-week. I'll grant you, the Hudson/Jenkins debacle was deserving of ire, but Oracle is hardly the Evil Emperor the community makes them out to be--at least, so far. (I'll admit it, though, I'm a touch biased, both because Brian Goetz is a friend of mine and because Oracle TechNet has asked me to write a column for them next year. Still, in the spirit of "innocent until proven guilty"....)

NOW: It is with great pleasure that I score myself a "0" here. Oracle's been pretty good about things, sticking with the OpenJDK approach to developing software and talking very openly about what they're trying to do with Java8. They're not entirely innocent, mind you--the fact that a Java install tries to monkey with my browser bar by installing some plugin or other and so on is not something I really appreciate--but they're not acting like Ming the Merciless, either. Matter of fact, they even seem to be going out of their way to be community-inclusive, in some circles. I give myself a "-1" here, and I'm happy to claim it. Good job, guys.

THEN: VMWare/SpringSource will start pushing their cloud solution in a major way.

Companies like Microsoft and Google are pushing cloud solutions because Software-as-a-Service is a reoccurring revenue model, generating revenue even in years when the product hasn't incremented. VMWare, being a product company, is in the same boat--the only time they make money is when they sell a new copy of their product, unless they can start pushing their virtualization story onto hardware on behalf of clients--a.k.a. "the cloud". With SpringSource as the software stack, VMWare has a more-or-less complete cloud play, so it's surprising that they didn't push it harder in 2011; I suspect they'll start cramming it down everybody's throats in 2012. Expect to see Rod Johnson talking a lot about the cloud as a result.

NOW: Again, I give myself a "-1" here, and frankly, I'm shocked to be doing it. I really thought this one was a no-brainer. CloudFoundry seemed like a pretty straightforward play, and VMWare already owned a significant share of the virtualization story, so.... And yet, I really haven't seen much by way of significant marketing, advertising, or developer outreach around their cloud story. It's much the same as what it was in 2011; it almost feels like the parent corporation (EMC) either doesn't "get" why they should push a cloud play, doesn't see it as worth the cost, or else doesn't care. Count me confused. "0"

THEN: JavaScript hype will continue to grow, and by years' end will be at near-backlash levels.

JavaScript (more properly known as ECMAScript, not that anyone seems to care but me) is gaining all kinds of steam as a mainstream development language (as opposed to just-a-browser language), particularly with the release of NodeJS. That hype will continue to escalate, and by the end of the year we may start to see a backlash against it. (Speaking personally, NodeJS is an interesting solution, but suggesting that it will replace your Tomcat or IIS server is a bit far-fetched; event-driven I/O is something both of those servers have been doing for years, and the rest of it is "just" a language discussion. We could pretty easily use JavaScript as the development language inside both servers, as Sun demonstrated years ago with their "Phobos" project--not that anybody really cared back then.)

NOW: JavaScript frameworks are exploding everywhere like fireworks at a Disney theme park. Douglas Crockford is getting more invites to conference keynote opportunities than James Gosling ever did. You can get a job if you know how to spell "NodeJS". And yet, I'm starting to hear the same kinds of rumblings about "how in the hell do we manage a 200K LOC codebase written in JavaScript" that I heard people gripe about Ruby/Rails a few years ago. If the backlash hasn't started, then it's right on the cusp. "+1"

THEN: NoSQL buzz will continue to grow, and by years' end will start to generate a backlash.

More and more companies are jumping into NoSQL-based solutions, and this trend will continue to accelerate, until some extremely public failure will start to generate a backlash against it. (This seems to be a pattern that shows up with a lot of technologies, so it seems entirely realistic that it'll happen here, too.) Mind you, I don't mean to suggest that the backlash will be factual or correct--usually these sorts of things come from misuing the tool, not from any intrinsic failure in it--but it'll generate some bad press.

NOW: Recently, I heard that NBC was thinking about starting up a new comedy series called "Everybody Hates Mongo", with Chris Rock narrating. And I think that's just the beginning--lots of companies, particularly startups, decided to run with a NoSQL solution before seriously contemplating how they were going to make up for the things that a NoSQL doesn't provide (like a schema, for a lot of these), and suddenly find themselves wishing they had spent a little more time thinking about that back in the early days. Again, if the backlash isn't already started, it's about to. "+1"

THEN: Ted will thoroughly rock the house during his CodeMash keynote.

Yeah, OK, that's more of a fervent wish than a prediction, but hey, keep a positive attitude and all that, right?

NOW: Welllll..... Looking back at it with almost a years' worth of distance, I can freely admit I dropped a few too many "F"-bombs (a buddy of mine counted 18), but aside from a (very) vocal minority, my takeaway is that a lot of people enjoyed it. Still, I do wish I'd throttled it back some--InfoQ recorded it, and the fact that it hasn't yet seen public posting on the website implies (to me) that they found it too much work to "bleep" out all the naughty words. Which I call "my bad" on, because I think they were really hoping to use that as part of their promotional activities (not that they needed it, selling out again in minutes). To all those who found it distasteful, I apologize, and to those who chafe at the fact that I'm apologizing, I apologize. I take a "-1" here.

2013 Predictions:

Having thus scored myself at a "9" (out of 17) for last year, let's take a stab at a few for next year:

  • "Big data" and "data analytics" will dominate the enterprise landscape. I'm actually pretty late to the ballgame to talk about this one, in fact--it was starting its rapid climb up the hype wave already this year. And, part and parcel with going up this end of the hype wave this quickly, it also stands to reason that companies will start marketing the hell out of the term "big data" without being entirely too precise about what they mean when they say "big data".... By the end of the year, people will start building services and/or products on top of Hadoop, which appears primed to be the "Big Data" platform of choice, thus far.
  • NoSQL buzz will start to diversify. The various "NoSQL" vendors are going to start wanting to differentiate themselves from each other, and will start using "NoSQL" in their marketing and advertising talking points less and less. Some of this will be because Pandora's Box on data storage has already been opened--nobody's just assuming a relational database all the time, every time, anymore--but some of this will be because the different NoSQL vendors, who are at different stages in the adoption curve, will want to differentiate themselves from the vendors that are taking on the backlash. I predict Mongo, who seems to be leading the way of the NoSQL vendors, will be the sacrificial scapegoat for a lot of the NoSQL backlash that's coming down the pike.
  • Desktops increasingly become niche products. Look, does anyone buy a desktop machine anymore? I have three sitting next to me in my office, and none of the three has been turned on in probably two years--I'm exclusively laptop-bound these days. Between tablets as consumption devices (slowly obsoleting the laptop), and cloud offerings becoming more and more varied (slowly obsoleting the server), there's just no room for companies that sell desktops--or the various Mom-and-Pop shops that put them together for you. In fact, I'm starting to wonder if all those parts I used to buy at Fry's Electronics and swap meets will start to disappear, too. Gamers keep desktops alive, and I don't know if there's enough money in that world to keep lots of those vendors alive. (I hope so, but I don't know for sure.)
  • Home servers will start to grow in interest. This may seem paradoxical to the previous point, but I think techno-geek leader-types are going to start looking into "servers-in-a-box" that they can set up at home and have all their devices sync to and store to. Sure, all the media will come through there, and the key here will be "turnkey", since most folks are getting used to machines that "just work". Lots of friends, for example, seem to be using Mac Minis for exactly this purpose, and there's a vendor here in Redmond that sells a ridiculously-powered server in a box for a couple thousand. (This is on my birthday list, right after I get my maxed-out 13" MacBook Air and iPad 3.) This is also going to be fueled by...
  • Private cloud is going to start getting hot. The great advantage of cloud is that you don't have to have an IT department; the great disadvantage of cloud is that when things go bad, you don't have an IT department. Too many well-publicized cloud failures are going to drive corporations to try and find a solution that is the best-of-both-worlds: the flexibility and resiliency of cloud provisioning, but staffed by IT resources they can whip and threaten and cajole when things fail. (And, by the way, I fully understand that most cloud providers have better uptimes than most private IT organizations--this is about perception and control and the feelings of powerlessness and helplessness when things go south, not reality.)
  • Oracle will release Java8, and while several Java pundits will decry "it's not the Java I love!", most will actually come to like it. Let's be blunt, Java has long since moved past being the flower of fancy and a critic's darling, and it's moved squarely into the battleship-gray of slogging out code and getting line-of-business apps done. Java8 adopting function literals (aka "closures") and retrofitting the Collection library to use them will be a subtle, but powerful, extension to the lifetime of the Java language, but it's never going to be sexy again. Fortunately, it doesn't need to be.
  • Microsoft will start courting the .NET developers again. Windows8 left a bad impression in the minds of many .NET developers, with the emphasis on HTML/JavaScript apps and C++ apps, leaving many .NET developers to wonder if they were somehow rendered obsolete by the new platform. Despite numerous attempts in numerous ways to tell them no, developers still seem to have that opinion--and Microsoft needs to go on the offensive to show them that .NET and Windows8 (and WinRT) do, in fact, go very well together. Microsoft can't afford for their loyal developer community to feel left out or abandoned. They know that, and they'll start working on it.
  • Samsung will start pushing themselves further and further into the consumer market. They already have started gathering more and more of a consumer name for themselves, they just need to solidify their tablet offerings and get closer in line with either Google (for Android tablets) or even Microsoft (for Windows8 tablets and/or Surface competitors) to compete with Apple. They may even start looking into writing their own tablet OS, which would be something of a mistake, but an understandable one.
  • Apple's next release cycle will, again, be "more of the same". iPhone 6, iPad 4, iPad Mini 2, MacBooks, MacBook Airs, none of them are going to get much in the way of innovation or new features. Apple is going to run squarely into the Innovator's Dilemma soon, and their products are going to be "more of the same" for a while. Incremental improvements along a couple of lines, perhaps, but nothing Earth-shattering. (Hey, Apple, how about opening up Siri to us to program against, for example, so we can hook into her command structure and hook our own apps up? I can do that with Android today, why not her?)
  • Visual Studio 2014 features will start being discussed at the end of the year. If Microsoft is going to hit their every-two-year-cycle with Visual Studio, then they'll start talking/whispering/rumoring some of the v.Next features towards the middle to end of 2013. I fully expect C# 6 will get some form of type providers, Visual Basic will be a close carbon copy of C# again, and F# 4 will have something completely revolutionary that anyone who sees it will be like, "Oh, cool! Now, when can I get that in C#?"
  • Scala interest wanes. As much as I don't want it to happen, I think interest in Scala is going to slow down, and possibly regress. This will be the year that Typesafe needs to make a major splash if they want to show the world that they're serious, and I don't know that the JVM world is really all that interested in seeing a new player. Instead, I think Scala will be seen as what "the 1%" of the Java community uses, and the rest will take some ideas from there and apply them (poorly, perhaps) to Java.
  • Interest in native languages will rise. Just for kicks, developers will start experimenting with some of the new compile-to-native-code languages (Go, Rust, Slate, Haskell, whatever) and start finding some of the joys (and heartaches) that come with running "on the metal". More importantly, they'll start looking at ways to use these languages with platforms where running "on the metal" is more important, like mobile devices and tablets.

As always, folks, thanks for reading. See you next year.

UPDATE: Two things happened this week (7 Jan 2013) that made me want to add to this list:
  • Hardware is the new platform. A buddy of mine (Scott Davis) pointed out on a mailing list we share that "hardware is the new platform", and with Microsoft's Surface out now, there's three major players (Apple, Google, Microsoft) in this game. It's becoming apparent that more and more companies are starting to see opportunities in going the Apple route of owning not just the OS and the store, but the hardware underneath it. More and more companies are going to start playing this game, too, I think, and we're going to see Amazon take some shots here, and probably a few others. Of course, already announced is the Ubuntu Phone, and a new Android-like player, Tizen, but I'm not thinking about new players--there's always new players--but about some of the big standouts. And look for companies like Dell and HP to start looking for ways to play in this game, too, either through partnerships or acquisitions. (Hello, Oracle, I'm looking at you.... And Adobe, too.)
  • APIs for lots of things are going to come out. Ford just did this. This is not going away--this is going to proliferate. And the startup community is going to lap it up like kittens attacking a bowl of cream. If you're looking for a play in the startup world, pursue this.

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Tuesday, January 01, 2013 1:22:30 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Saturday, November 03, 2012
Cloud legal

There's an interesting legal interpretation coming out of the Electronic Freedom Foundation (EFF) around the Megaupload case, and the EFF has said this:

"The government maintains that Mr. Goodwin lost his property rights in his data by storing it on a cloud computing service. Specifically, the government argues that both the contract between Megaupload and Mr. Goodwin (a standard cloud computing contract) and the contract between Megaupload and the server host, Carpathia (also a standard agreement), "likely limit any property interest he may have" in his data. (Page 4). If the government is right, no provider can both protect itself against sudden losses (like those due to a hurricane) and also promise its customers that their property rights will be maintained when they use the service. Nor can they promise that their property might not suddenly disappear, with no reasonable way to get it back if the government comes in with a warrant. Apparently your property rights "become severely limited" if you allow someone else to host your data under standard cloud computing arrangements. This argument isn't limited in any way to Megaupload -- it would apply if the third party host was Amazon's S3 or Google Apps or or Apple iCloud."
Now, one of the participants on the Seattle Tech Startup list, Jonathan Shapiro, wrote this as an interpretation of the government's brief and the EFF filing:

What the government actually says is that the state of Mr. Goodwin's property rights depends on his agreement with the cloud provider and their agreement with the infrastructure provider. The question ultimately comes down to: if I upload data onto a machine that you own, who owns the copy of the data that ends up on your machine? The answer to that question depends on the agreements involved, which is what the government is saying. Without reviewing the agreements, it isn't clear if the upload should be thought of as a loan, a gift, a transfer, or something else.

Lacking any physical embodiment, it is not clear whether the bits comprising these uploaded digital artifacts constitute property in the traditional sense at all. Even if they do, the government is arguing that who owns the bits may have nothing to do with who controls the use of the bits; that the two are separate matters. That's quite standard: your decision to buy a book from the bookstore conveys ownership to you, but does not give you the right to make further copies of the book. Once a copy of the data leaves the possession of Mr. Goodwin, the constraints on its use are determined by copyright law and license terms. The agreement between Goodwin and the cloud provider clearly narrows the copyright-driven constraints, because the cloud provider has to be able to make copies to provide their services, and has surely placed terms that permit this in their user agreement. The consequences for ownership are unclear. In particular: if the cloud provider (as opposed to Mr. Goodwin) makes an authorized copy of Goodwin's data in the course of their operations, using only the resources of the cloud provider, the ownership of that copy doesn't seem obvious at all. A license may exist requiring that copy to be destroyed under certain circumstances (e.g. if Mr. Goodwin terminates his contract), but that doesn't speak to ownership of the copy.

Because no sale has occurred, and there was clearly no intent to cede ownership, the Government's challenge concerning ownership has the feel of violating common sense. If you share that feeling, welcome to the world of intellectual property law. But while everyone is looking at the negative side of this argument, it's worth considering that there may be positive consequences of the Government's argument. In Germany, for example, software is property. It is illegal (or at least unenforceable) to write a software license in Germany that stops me from selling my copy of a piece of software to my friend, so long as I remove it from my machine. A copy of a work of software can be resold in the same way that a book can be resold because it is property. At present, the provisions of UCITA in the U.S. have the effect that you do not own a work of software that you buy. If the district court in Virginia determines that a recipient has property rights in a copy of software that they receive, that could have far-reaching consequences, possibly including a consequent right of resale in the United States.

Now, whether or not Jon's interpretation is correct, there are some huge legal implications of this interpretation of the cloud, because data "ownership" is going to be the defining legal issue of the next century.


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Saturday, November 03, 2012 12:14:40 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Thursday, November 01, 2012
Vietnam... in Bulgarian

I received an email from Dimitar Teykiyski a few days ago, asking if he could translate the "Vietnam of Computer Science" essay into Bulgarian, and no sooner had I replied in the affirmative than he sent me the link to it. If you're Bulgarian, enjoy. I'll try to make a few moments to put the link to the translation directly on the original blog post itself, but it'll take a little bit--I have a few other things higher up in the priority queue. (And somebody please tell me how to say "Thank you" in Bulgarian, so I may do that right for Dimitar?)


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Thursday, November 01, 2012 4:17:58 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Friday, March 16, 2012
Just Say No to SSNs

Two things conspire to bring you this blog post.

Of Contracts and Contracts

First, a few months ago, I was asked to participate in an architectural review for a project being done for one of the states here in the US. It was a project dealing with some sensitive information (Child Welfare Services), and I was required to sign a document basically promising not to do anything bad with the data. Not a problem to sign, since I was going to be more focused on the architecture and code anyway, and would stay away from the production servers and data as much as I possibly could. But then the state agency asked for my social security number, and when I pushed back asking why, they told me it was “mandatory” in order to work on the project. I suspect it was for a background check—but when I asked how long they were going to hold on to the number and what their privacy policy was regarding my data, they refused to answer, and I never heard from them again. Which, quite frankly, was something of a relief.

Second, just tonight there was a thread on the Seattle Tech Startup mailing list about SSNs again. This time, a contractor who participates on the list was being asked by the contracting agency for his SSN, not for any tax document form, but… just because. This sounded fishy. It turned out that the contract was going to be with AT&T, and that they commonly use a contractor’s SSN as a way of identifying the contractor in their vendor database. It was also noted that many companies do this, and that it was likely that many more would do so in the future. One poster pointed out that when the state’s attorney general’s office was contacted about this practice, it isn’t illegal.

Folks, this practice has to stop. For both your sake, and the company’s.

Of Data and Integrity

Using SSNs in your database is just a bad idea from top to bottom. For starters, it makes your otherwise-unassuming enterprise application a ripe target for hackers, who seek to gather legitimate SSNs as part of the digital fingerprinting of potential victims for identity theft. What’s worse, any time I’ve ever seen any company store the SSNs, they’re almost always stored in plaintext form (“These aren’t credit cards!”), and they’re often used as a primary key to uniquely identify individuals.

There’s so many things wrong with this idea from a data management perspective, it’s shameful.

  • SSNs were never intended for identification purposes. Yeah, this is a weak argument now, given all the de facto uses to which they are put already, but when FDR passed the Social Security program back in the 30s, he promised the country that they would never be used for identification purposes. This is, in fact, why the card reads “This number not to be used for identification purposes” across the bottom. Granted, every financial institution with whom I’ve ever done business has ignored that promise for as long as I’ve been alive, but that doesn’t strike me as a reason to continue doing so.
  • SSNs are not unique. There’s rumors of two different people being issued the same SSN, and while I can’t confirm or deny this based on personal experience, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that if there are 300 million people living in the US, and the SSN is a nine-digit number, that means that there are 999,999,999 potential numbers in the best case (which isn’t possible, because the first three digits are a stratification mechanism—for example, California-issued numbers are generally in the 5xx range, while East Coast-issued numbers are in the 0xx range). What I can say for certain is that SSNs are, in fact, recycled—so your new baby may (and very likely will) end up with some recently-deceased individual’s SSN. As we start to see databases extending to a second and possibly even third generation of individuals, these kinds of conflicts are going to become even more common. As US population continues to rise, and immigration brings even more people into the country to work, how soon before we start seeing the US government sweat the problems associated with trying to go to a 10- or 11-digit SSN? It’s going to make the IPv4 and IPv6 problems look trivial by comparison. (Look for that to be the moment when the US government formally adopts a hexadecimal system for SSNs.)
  • SSNs are sensitive data. You knew this already. But what you may not realize is that data not only has a tendency to escape the organization that gathered it (databases are often sold, acquired, or stolen), but that said data frequently lives far, far longer than it needs to. Look around in your own company—how many databases are still online, in use, even though the data isn’t really relevant anymore, just because “there’s no cost to keeping it”? More importantly, companies are increasingly being held accountable for sensitive information breaches, and it’s just a matter of time before a creative lawyer seeking to tap into the public’s sensitivities to things they don’t understand leads him/her takes a company to court, suing them for damages for such a breach. And there’s very likely more than a few sympathetic judges in the country to the idea. Do you really want to be hauled up on the witness stand to defend your use of the SSN in your database?

Given that SSNs aren’t unique, and therefore fail as their primary purpose in a data management scheme, and that they represent a huge liability because of their sensitive nature, why on earth would you want them in your database?

A Call

But more importantly, companies aren’t going to stop using them for these kinds of purposes until we make them stop. Any time a company asks you for your SSN, challenge them. Ask them why they need it, if the transaction can be completed without it, and if they insist on having it, a formal declaration of their sensitive information policy and what kind of notification and compensation you can expect when they suffer a sensitive data breach. It may take a while to find somebody within the company who can answer your questions at the places that legitimately need the information, but you’ll get there eventually. And for the rest of the companies that gather it “just in case”, well, if it starts turning into a huge PITA to get them, they’ll find other ways to figure out who you are.

This is a call to arms, folks: Just say NO to handing over your SSN.


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Friday, March 16, 2012 11:10:49 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Saturday, March 03, 2012
Want Security? Get Quality

This CNET report tells us what we’ve probably known for a few years now: in the hacker/securist cyberwar, the hackers are winning. Or at the very least, making it pretty apparent that the cybersecurity companies aren’t making much headway.

Notable quotes from the article:

Art Coviello, executive chairman of RSA, at least had the presence of mind to be humble, acknowledging in his keynote that current "security models" are inadequate. Yet he couldn't help but lapse into rah-rah boosterism by the end of his speech. "Never have so many companies been under attack, including RSA," he said. "Together we can learn from these experiences and emerge from this hell, smarter and stronger than we were before."
Really? History would suggest otherwise. Instead of finally locking down our data and fencing out the shadowy forces who want to steal our identities, the security industry is almost certain to present us with more warnings of newer and scarier threats and bigger, more dangerous break-ins and data compromises and new products that are quickly outdated. Lather, rinse, repeat.

The industry's sluggishness is enough to breed pervasive cynicism in some quarters. Critics like [Josh Corman, director of security intelligence at Akamai] are quick to note that if security vendors really could do what they promise, they'd simply put themselves out of business. "The security industry is not about securing you; it's about making money," Corman says. "Minimum investment to get maximum revenue."

Getting companies to devote time and money to adequately address their security issues is particularly difficult because they often don't think there's a problem until they've been compromised. And for some, too much knowledge can be a bad thing. "Part of the problem might be plausible deniability, that if the company finds something, there will be an SEC filing requirement," Landesman said.

The most important quote in the whole piece?

Of course, it would help if software in general was less buggy. Some security experts are pushing for a more proactive approach to security much like preventative medicine can help keep you healthy. The more secure the software code, the fewer bugs and the less chance of attackers getting in.

"Most of RSA, especially on the trade show floor, is reactive security and the idea behind that is protect broken stuff from the bad people," said Gary McGraw, chief technology officer at Cigital. "But that hasn't been working very well. It's like a hamster wheel."

(Fair disclosure in the interests of journalistic integrity: Gary is something of a friend; we’ve exchanged emails, met at SDWest many years ago, and Gary tried to recruit me to write a book in his Software Security book series with Addison-Wesley. His voice is one of the few that I trust implicitly when it comes to software security.)

Next time the company director, CEO/CTO or VP wants you to choose “faster” and “cheaper” and leave out “better” in the “better, faster, cheaper” triad, point out to them that “worse” (the opposite of “better”) often translates into “insecure”, and that in turn puts the company in a hugely vulnerable spot. Remember, even if the application under question, or its data, aren’t obvious targets for hackers, you’re still a target—getting access to the server can act as a springboard to attack other servers, and/or use the data stored in your database as a springboard to attack other servers. Remember, it’s very common for users to reuse passwords across systems—obtaining the passwords to your app can in turn lead to easy access to the more sensitive data.

And folks, let’s not kid ourselves. That quote back there about “SEC filing requirement”s? If CEOs and CTOs are required to file with the SEC, it’s only a matter of time before one of them gets the bright idea to point the finger at the people who built the system as the culprits. (Don’t think it’s possible? All it takes is one case, one jury, in one highly business-friendly judicial arena, and suddenly precedent is set and it becomes vastly easier to pursue all over the country.)

Anybody interested in creating an anonymous cybersecurity whisteblowing service?


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Saturday, March 03, 2012 10:53:08 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Friday, March 02, 2012
Leveling up “DDD”

Eric Evans, a number of years ago, wrote a book on “Domain Driven Design”.

Around the same time, Martin Fowler coined the “Rich Domain Model” pattern.

Ever since then, people have been going bat-shit nutso over building these large domain object models, then twisting and contorting them in all these various ways to make them work across different contexts—across tiers, for example, and into databases, and so on. It created a cottage industry of infrastructure tools, toolkits, libraries and frameworks, all designed somehow to make your objects less twisted and more usable and less tightly-coupled to infrastructure (I’ll pause for a moment to let you think about the absurdity of that—infrastructure designed to reduce coupling to other infrastructure—before we go on), and so on.

All the time, though, we were shying away from really taking the plunge, and thinking about domain entities in domain terms.

Jessica Kerr nails it, on the head. Her post is in the context of Java (with, ironically, some F# thrown in for clarity), but the fact is, the Java parts could’ve been written in C# or C++ and the discussion would be the exact same.

To think about building domain objects, if you are really looking to build a domain model, means to think beyond the implementation language you’re building them in. That means you have to stop thinking in terms of “Strings” and “ints”, but in terms of “FirstName” and “Age” types. Ironically, Java is ill-suited as a language to support this. C# is not great about this, but it is easier than Java. C++, ironically, may be best suited for this, given the ease with which we can set up “aliased” types, via either the typedef or even the lowly preprocessor macro (though it hurts me to say that).

I disagree with her when she says that it’s a problem that FirstName can’t inherit from String—frankly, I hold the position that doing so would be putting too much implementation detail into FirstName then, and would hurt FirstName’s chances for evolution and enhancement—but the rest of the post is so spot-on, it’s scary.

And the really ironic thing? I remember having this conversation nearly twenty years ago, in the context of C++ at the time.

Want another mind-warping discussion around DDD and how to think about domain objects correctly? Read Allen Holub’s “Getters and Setters Considered Harmful” article of nine (!) years ago.

Read those two entries, think on them for a bit, then give it a whirl in your own projects. Or as a research spike. I think you’ll start to find a lot of that infrastructure code starting to drop away and become unnecessary. And that will let you get back to the essence of objects, and level up your DDD.

(Unfortunately, I don’t know what leveled-up DDD is called. DDD++, maybe?)


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Friday, March 02, 2012 4:08:57 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Wednesday, January 25, 2012
Is Programming Less Exciting Today?

As discriminatory as this is going to sound, this one is for the old-timers. If you started programming after the turn of the milennium, I don’t know if you’re going to be able to follow the trend of this post—not out of any serious deficiency on your part, hardly that. But I think this is something only the old-timers are going to identify with. (And thus, do I alienate probably 80% of my readership, but so be it.)

Is it me, or is programming just less interesting today than it was two decades ago?

By all means, shake your smartphones and other mobile devices at me and say, “Dude, how can you say that?”, but in many ways programming for Android and iOS reminds me of programming for Windows and Mac OS two decades ago. HTML 5 and JavaScript remind me of ten years ago, the first time HTML and JavaScript came around. The discussions around programming languages remind me of the discussions around C++. The discussions around NoSQL remind me of the arguments both for and against relational databases. It all feels like we’ve been here before, with only the names having changed.

Don’t get me wrong—if any of you comment on the differences between HTML 5 now and HTML 3.2 then, or the degree of the various browser companies agreeing to the standard today against the “browser wars” of a decade ago, I’ll agree with you. This isn’t so much of a rational and logical discussion as it is an emotive and intuitive one. It just feels similar.

To be honest, I get this sense that across the entire industry right now, there’s a sort of malaise, a general sort of “Bah, nothing really all that new is going on anymore”. NoSQL is re-introducing storage ideas that had been around before but were discarded (perhaps injudiciously and too quickly) in favor of the relational model. Functional languages have obviously been in place since the 50’s (in Lisp). And so on.

More importantly, look at the Java community: what truly innovative ideas have emerged here in the last five years? Every new open-source project or commercial endeavor either seems to be a refinement of an idea before it (how many different times are we going to create a new Web framework, guys?) or an attempt to leverage an idea coming from somewhere else (be it from .NET or from Ruby or from JavaScript or….). With the upcoming .NET 4.5 release and Windows 8, Microsoft is holding out very little “new and exciting” bits for the community to invest emotionally in: we hear about “async” in C# 5 (something that F# has had already, thank you), and of course there is WinRT (another platform or virtual machine… sort of), and… well, honestly, didn’t we just do this a decade ago? Where is the WCFs, the WPFs, the Silverlights, the things that would get us fired up? Hell, even a new approach to data access might stir some excitement. Node.js feels like an attempt to reinvent the app server, but if you look back far enough you see that the app server itself was reinvented once (in the Java world) in Spring and other lightweight frameworks, and before that by people who actually thought to write their own web servers in straight Java. (And, for the record, the whole event-driven I/O thing is something that’s been done in both Java and .NET a long time before now.)

And as much as this is going to probably just throw fat on the fire, all the excitement around JavaScript as a language reminds me of the excitement about Ruby as a language. Does nobody remember that Sun did this once already, with Phobos? Or that Netscape did this with LiveScript? JavaScript on the server end is not new, folks. It’s just new to the people who’d never seen it before.

In years past, there has always seemed to be something deeper, something more exciting and more innovative that drives the industry in strange ways. Artificial Intelligence was one such thing: the search to try and bring computers to a state of human-like sentience drove a lot of interesting ideas and concepts forward, but over the last decade or two, AI seems to have lost almost all of its luster and momentum. User interfaces—specifically, GUIs—were another force for a while, until GUIs got to the point where they were so common and so deeply rooted in their chosen pasts (the single-button of the Mac, the menubar-per-window of Windows, etc) that they left themselves so little room for maneuver. At least this is one area where Microsoft is (maybe) putting the fatted sacred cow to the butcher’s knife, with their Metro UI moves in Windows 8… but only up to a point.

Maybe I’m just old and tired and should hang up my keyboard and go take up farming, then go retire to my front porch’s rocking chair and practice my Hey you kids! Getoffamylawn! or something. But before you dismiss me entirely, do me a favor and tell me: what gets you excited these days? If you’ve been programming for twenty years, what about the industry today gets your blood moving and your mind sharpened?


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Wednesday, January 25, 2012 3:24:43 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Sunday, January 01, 2012
Tech Predictions, 2012 Edition

Well, friends, another year has come and gone, and it's time for me to put my crystal ball into place and see what the upcoming year has for us. But, of course, in the long-standing tradition of these predictions, I also need to put my spectacles on (I did turn 40 last year, after all) and have a look at how well I did in this same activity twelve months ago.

Let's see what unbelievable gobs of hooey I slung last year came even remotely to pass. For 2011, I said....

  • THEN: Android’s penetration into the mobile space is going to rise, then plateau around the middle of the year. Android phones, collectively, have outpaced iPhone sales. That’s a pretty significant statistic—and it means that there’s fewer customers buying smartphones in the coming year. More importantly, the first generation of Android slates (including the Galaxy Tab, which I own), are less-than-sublime, and not really an “iPad Killer” device by any stretch of the imagination. And I think that will slow down people buying Android slates and phones, particularly since Google has all but promised that Android releases will start slowing down.
    • NOW: Well, I think I get a point for saying that Android's penetration will rise... but then I lose it for suggesting that it would slow down. Wow, was I wrong on that. Once Amazon put the Kindle Fire out, suddenly for the first time Android tablets began to appear in peoples' hands in record numbers. The drawback here is that most people using the Fire don't realize it's an Android tablet, which certainly hurts Google's brand-awareness (not that Amazon really seems to mind), but the upshot is simple: people are still buying devices, even though they may already own one. Which amazes me.
  • THEN: Windows Phone 7 penetration into the mobile space will appear huge, then slow down towards the middle of the year. Microsoft is getting some pretty decent numbers now, from what I can piece together, and I think that’s largely the “I love Microsoft” crowd buying in. But it’s a pretty crowded place right now with Android and iPhone, and I’m not sure if the much-easier Office and/or Exchange integration is enough to woo consumers (who care about Office) or business types (who care about Exchange) away from their Androids and iPhones.
    • NOW: Despite the catastrophic implosion of RIM (thus creating a huge market of people looking to trade their Blackberrys in for other mobile phones, ones which won't all go down when a RIM server implodes), WP7 has definitely not emerged as the "third player" in the mobile space; or, perhaps more precisely, they feel like a distant third, rather than a creditable alternative to the other two. In fact, more and more it just feels like this is a two-horse race and Microsoft is in it still because they're willing to throw loss after loss to stay in it. (For what reason, I'm not sure--it's not clear to me that they can ever reach a point of profitability here, even once Nokia makes the transition to WP7, which is supposedly going to take years. On the order of a half-decade or so.) Even living here in Redmon, where I would expect the WP7 concentration to be much, much higher than anywhere else in the world, it's still more common to see iPhones and 'droids in peoples' hands than it is to see WP7 phones.
  • THEN: Android, iOS and/or Windows Phone 7 becomes a developer requirement. Developers, if you haven’t taken the time to learn how to program one of these three platforms, you are electing to remove yourself from a growing market that desperately wants people with these skills. I see the “mobile native app development” space as every bit as hot as the “Internet/Web development” space was back in 2000. If you don’t have a device, buy one. If you have a device, get the tools—in all three cases they’re free downloads—and start writing stupid little apps that nobody cares about, so you can have some skills on the platform when somebody cares about it.
    • NOW: Wow, yes. Right now, if you are a developer and you haven't spent at least a little time learning mobile development, you are excluding yourself from a development "boom" that rivals the one around Web sites in the mid-90's. Seriously: remember when everybody had to have a website? That's the mentality right now with a ton of different companies--"we have to have a mobile app!" "But we sell condom lubricant!" "Doesn't matter! We need a mobile app! Build us something! Go go go go go!"
  • THEN: The Windows 7 slates will suck. This isn’t a prediction, this is established fact. I played with an “ExoPC” 10” form factor slate running Windows 7 (Dell I think was the manufacturer), and it was a horrible experience. Windows 7, like most OSes, really expects a keyboard to be present, and a slate doesn’t have one—so the OS was hacked to put a “keyboard” button at the top of the screen that would slide out to let you touch-type on the slate. I tried to fire up Notepad and type out a haiku, and it was an unbelievably awkward process. Android and iOS clearly own the slate market for the forseeable future, and if Dell has any brains in its corporate head, it will phone up Google tomorrow and start talking about putting Android on that hardware.
    • NOW: Yeah, that was something of a "gimme" point (but I'll take it). Windows7 on a slate was a Bad Idea, and I'm pretty sure the sales reflect that. Conduct your own anecdotal poll: see if you can find a store somewhere in your town or city that will actually sell you a Windows7 slate. Can't find one? I can--it's the Microsoft store in town, and I'm not entirely sure they still stock them. Certainly our local Best Buy doesn't.
  • THEN: DSLs mostly disappear from the buzz. I still see no strawman (no “pet store” equivalent), and none of the traditional builders-of-strawmen (Microsoft, Oracle, etc) appear interested in DSLs much anymore, so I think 2010 will mark the last year that we spent any time talking about the concept.
    • NOW: I'm going to claim a point here, too. DSLs have pretty much left us hanging. Without a strawman for developers to "get", the DSL movement has more or less largely died out. I still sometimes hear people refer to something that isn't a programming language but does something technical as a "DSL" ("That shipping label? That's a DSL!"), and that just tells me that the concept never really took root.
  • THEN: Facebook becomes more of a developer requirement than before. I don’t like Mark Zuckerburg. I don’t like Facebook’s privacy policies. I don’t particularly like the way Facebook approaches the Facebook Connect experience. But Facebook owns enough people to be the fourth-largest nation on the planet, and probably commands an economy of roughly that size to boot. If your app is aimed at the Facebook demographic (that is, everybody who’s not on Twitter), you have to know how to reach these people, and that means developing at least some part of your system to integrate with it.
    • NOW: Facebook, if anything, has become more important through 2011, particularly for startups looking to get some exposure and recognition. Facebook continues to screw with their user experience, though, and they keep screwing with their security policies, and as "big" a presence as they have, it's not invulnerable, and if they're not careful, they're going to find themselves on the other side of the relevance curve.
  • THEN: Twitter becomes more of a developer requirement, too. Anybody who’s not on Facebook is on Twitter. Or dead. So to reach the other half of the online community, you have to know how to connect out with Twitter.
    • NOW: Twitter's impact has become deeper, but more muted in some ways--people don't think of Twitter as a "new" channel, but one that they've come to expect and get used to. At the same time, how Twitter is supposed to factor into different applications isn't always clear, which hinders Twitter's acceptance and "must-have"-ness. Of course, Twitter could care less, it seems, though it still confuses me how they actually make money.
  • THEN: XMPP becomes more of a developer requirement. XMPP hasn’t crossed a lot of people’s radar screen before, but Facebook decided to adopt it as their chat system communication protocol, and Google’s already been using it, and suddenly there’s a whole lotta traffic going over XMPP. More importantly, it offers a two-way communication experience that is in some scenarios vastly better than what HTTP offers, yet running in a very “Internet-friendly” way just as HTTP does. I suspect that XMPP is going to start cropping up in a number of places as a useful alternative and/or complement to using HTTP.
    • NOW: Well, unfortunately, XMPP still hides underneath other names and still doesn't come to mind when people are thinking about communication, leaving this one way unfulfilled. *sigh* Maybe someday we will learn that not everything has to go over HTTP, but it didn't happen in 2011.
  • THEN: “Gamification” starts making serious inroads into non-gaming systems. Maybe it’s just because I’ve been talking more about gaming, game design, and game implementation last year, but all of a sudden “gamification”—the process of putting game-like concepts into non-game applications—is cresting in a big way. FourSquare, Yelp, Gowalla, suddenly all these systems are offering achievement badges and scoring systems for people who want to play in their worlds. How long is it before a developer is pulled into a meeting and told that “we need to put achievement badges into the call-center support application”? Or the online e-commerce portal? It’ll start either this year or next.
    • NOW: Gamification is emerging, but slowly and under the radar. It's certainly not as strong as I thought it would be, but gamification concepts are sneaking their way into a variety of different scenarios (beyond games themselves). Probably can't claim a point here, no.
  • THEN: Functional languages will hit a make-or-break point. I know, I said it last year. But the buzz keeps growing, and when that happens, it usually means that it’s either going to reach a critical mass and explode, or it’s going to implode—and the longer the buzz grows, the faster it explodes or implodes, accordingly. My personal guess is that the “F/O hybrids”—F#, Scala, etc—will continue to grow until they explode, particularly since the suggested v.Next changes to both Java and C# have to be done as language changes, whereas futures for F# frequently are either built as libraries masquerading as syntax (such as asynchronous workflows, introduced in 2.0) or as back-end library hooks that anybody can plug in (such as type providers, introduced at PDC a few months ago), neither of which require any language revs—and no concerns about backwards compatibility with existing code. This makes the F/O hybrids vastly more flexible and stable. In fact, I suspect that within five years or so, we’ll start seeing a gradual shift away from pure O-O systems, into systems that use a lot more functional concepts—and that will propel the F/O languages into the center of the developer mindshare.
    • NOW: More than any of my other predictions (or subjects of interest), functional languages stump me the most. On the one hand, there doesn't seem to be a drop-off of interest in the subject, based on a variety of anecdotal evidence (books, articles, etc), but on the other hand, they don't seem to be crossing over into the "mainstream" programming worlds, either. At best, we can say that they are entering the mindset of senior programmers and/or project leads and/or architects, but certainly they don't seem to be turning in to the "go-to" language for projects being done in 2011.
  • THEN: The Microsoft Kinect will lose its shine. I hate to say it, but I just don’t see where the excitement is coming from. Remember when the Wii nunchucks were the most amazing thing anybody had ever seen? Frankly, after a slew of initial releases for the Wii that made use of them in interesting ways, the buzz has dropped off, and more importantly, the nunchucks turned out to be just another way to move an arrow around on the screen—in other words, we haven’t found particularly novel and interesting/game-changing ways to use the things. That’s what I think will happen with the Kinect. Sure, it’s really freakin’ cool that you can use your body as the controller—but how precise is it, how quickly can it react to my body movements, and most of all, what new user interface metaphors are people going to have to come up with in order to avoid the “me-too” dancing-game clones that are charging down the pipeline right now?
    • NOW: Kinect still makes for a great Christmas or birthday present, but nobody seems to be all that amazed by the idea anymore. Certainly we aren't seeing a huge surge in using Kinect as a general user interface device, at least not yet. Maybe it needed more time for people to develop those new metaphors, but at the same time, I would've expected at least a few more games to make use of it, and I haven't seen any this past year.
  • THEN: There will be no clear victor in the Silverlight-vs-HTML5 war. And make no mistake about it, a war is brewing. Microsoft, I think, finds itself in the inenviable position of having two very clearly useful technologies, each one’s “sphere of utility” (meaning, the range of answers to the “where would I use it?” question) very clearly overlapping. It’s sort of like being a football team with both Brett Favre and Tom Brady on your roster—both of them are superstars, but you know, deep down, that you have to cut one, because you can’t devote the same degree of time and energy to both. Microsoft is going to take most of 2011 and probably part of 2012 trying to support both, making a mess of it, offering up conflicting rationale and reasoning, in the end achieving nothing but confusing developers and harming their relationship with the Microsoft developer community in the process. Personally, I think Microsoft has no choice but to get behind HTML 5, but I like a lot of the features of Silverlight and think that it has a lot of mojo that HTML 5 lacks, and would actually be in favor of Microsoft keeping both—so long as they make it very clear to the developer community when and where each should be used. In other words, the executives in charge of each should be locked into a room and not allowed out until they’ve hammered out a business strategy that is then printed and handed out to every developer within a 3-continent radius of Redmond. (Chances of this happening: .01%)
    • NOW: Well, this was accurate all the way up until the last couple of months, when Microsoft made it fairly clear that Silverlight was being effectively "put behind" HTML 5, despite shipping another version of Silverlight. In the meantime, though, they've tried to support both (and some Silverlighters tell me that the Silverlight team is still looking forward to continuing supporting it, though I'm not sure at this point what is rumor and what is fact anymore), and yes, they confused the hell out of everybody. I'm surprised they pulled the trigger on it in 2011, though--I expected it to go a version or two more before they finally pulled the rug out.
  • THEN: Apple starts feeling the pressure to deliver a developer experience that isn’t mired in mid-90’s metaphor. Don’t look now, Apple, but a lot of software developers are coming to your platform from Java and .NET, and they’re bringing their expectations for what and how a developer IDE should look like, perform, and do, with them. Xcode is not a modern IDE, all the Apple fan-boy love for it notwithstanding, and this means that a few things will happen:
    • Eclipse gets an iOS plugin. Yes, I know, it wouldn’t work (for the most part) on a Windows-based Eclipse installation, but if Eclipse can have a native C/C++ developer experience, then there’s no reason why a Mac Eclipse install couldn’t have an Objective-C plugin, and that opens up the idea of using Eclipse to write iOS and/or native Mac apps (which will be critical when the Mac App Store debuts somewhere in 2011 or 2012).
    • Rumors will abound about Microsoft bringing Visual Studio to the Mac. Silverlight already runs on the Mac; why not bring the native development experience there? I’m not saying they’ll actually do it, and certainly not in 2011, but the rumors, they will be flyin….
    • Other third-party alternatives to Xcode will emerge and/or grow. MonoTouch is just one example. There’s opportunity here, just as the fledgling Java IDE market looked back in ‘96, and people will come to fill it.
    • NOW: Xcode 4 is "better", but it's still not what I would call comparable to the Microsoft Visual Studio or JetBrains IDEA experience. LLVM is definitely a better platform for the company's development efforts, long-term, and it's encouraging that they're investing so heavily into it, but I still wish the overall development experience was stronger. Meanwhile, though, no Eclipse plugin has emerged (that I'm aware of), which surprised me, and neither did we see Microsoft trying to step into that world, which doesn't surprise me, but disappoints me just a little. I realize that Microsoft's developer tools are generally designed to support the Windows operating system first, but Microsoft has to cut loose from that perspective if they're going to survive as a company. More on that later.
  • THEN: NoSQL buzz grows. The NoSQL movement, which sort of got started last year, will reach significant states of buzz this year. NoSQL databases have a lot to offer, particularly in areas that relational databases are weak, such as hierarchical kinds of storage requirements, for example. That buzz will reach a fever pitch this year, and the relational database moguls (Microsoft, Oracle, IBM) will start to fight back.
    • NOW: Well, the buzz certainly grew, and it surprised me that the big storage guys (Microsoft, IBM, Oracle) didn't do more to address it; I was expecting features to emerge in their database products to address some of the features present in MongoDB or CouchDB or some of the others, such as "schemaless" or map/reduce-style queries. Even just incorporating JavaScript into the engine somewhere would've generated a reaction.

Overall, it appears I'm running at about my usual 50/50 levels of prognostication. So be it. Let's see what the ol' crystal ball has in mind for 2012:

  • Lisps will be the languages to watch. With Clojure leading the way, Lisps (that is, languages that are more or less loosely based on Common Lisp or one of its variants) are slowly clawing their way back into the limelight. Lisps are both functional languages as well as dynamic languages, which gives them a significant reason for interest. Clojure runs on top of the JVM, which makes it highly interoperable with other JVM languages/systems, and Clojure/CLR is the version of Clojure for the CLR platform, though there seems to be less interest in it in the .NET world (which is a mistake, if you ask me).
  • Functional languages will.... I have no idea. As I said above, I'm kind of stymied on the whole functional-language thing and their future. I keep thinking they will either "take off" or "drop off", and they keep tacking to the middle, doing neither, just sort of hanging in there as a concept for programmers to take and run with. Mind you, I like functional languages, and I want to see them become mainstream, or at least more so, but I keep wondering if the mainstream programming public is ready to accept the ideas and concepts hiding therein. So this year, let's try something different: I predict that they will remain exactly where they are, neither "done" nor "accepted", but continue next year to sort of hang out in the middle.
  • F#'s type providers will show up in C# v.Next. This one is actually a "gimme", if you look across the history of F# and C#: for almost every version of F# v."N", features from that version show up in C# v."N+1". More importantly, F# 3.0's type provider feature is an amazing idea, and one that I think will open up language research in some very interesting ways. (Not sure what F#'s type providers are or what they'll do for you? Check out Don Syme's talk on it at BUILD last year.)
  • Windows8 will generate a lot of chatter. As 2012 progresses, Microsoft will try to force a lot of buzz around it by keeping things under wraps until various points in the year that feel strategic (TechEd, BUILD, etc). In doing so, though, they will annoy a number of people by not talking about them more openly or transparently. What's more....
  • Windows8 ("Metro")-style apps won't impress at first. The more I think about it, the more I'm becoming convinced that Metro-style apps on a desktop machine are going to collectively underwhelm. The UI simply isn't designed for keyboard-and-mouse kinds of interaction, and that's going to be the hardware setup that most people first experience Windows8 on--contrary to what (I think) Microsoft thinks, people do not just have tablets laying around waiting for Windows 8 to be installed on it, nor are they going to buy a Windows8 tablet just to try it out, at least not until it's gathered some mojo behind it. Microsoft is going to have to finesse the messaging here very, very finely, and that's not something they've shown themselves to be particularly good at over the last half-decade.
  • Scala will get bigger, thanks to Heroku. With the adoption of Scala and Play for their Java apps, Heroku is going to make Scala look attractive as a development platform, and the adoption of Play by Typesafe (the same people who brought you Akka) means that these four--Heroku, Scala, Play and Akka--will combine into a very compelling and interesting platform. I'm looking forward to seeing what comes of that.
  • Cloud will continue to whip up a lot of air. For all the hype and money spent on it, it doesn't really seem like cloud is gathering commensurate amounts of traction, across all the various cloud providers with the possible exception of Amazon's cloud system. But, as the different cloud platforms start to diversify their platform technology (Microsoft seems to be leading the way here, ironically, with the introduction of Java, Hadoop and some limited NoSQL bits into their Azure offerings), and as we start to get more experience with the pricing and costs of cloud, 2012 might be the year that we start to see mainstream cloud adoption, beyond "just" the usage patterns we've seen so far (as a backing server for mobile apps and as an easy way to spin up startups).
  • Android tablets will start to gain momentum. Amazon's Kindle Fire has hit the market strong, definitely better than any other Android-based tablet before it. The Nooq (the Kindle's principal competitor, at least in the e-reader world) is also an Android tablet, which means that right now, consumers can get into the Android tablet world for far, far less than what an iPad costs. Apple rumors suggest that they may have a 7" form factor tablet that will price competitively (in the $200/$300 range), but that's just rumor right now, and Apple has never shown an interest in that form factor, which means the 7" world will remain exclusively Android's (at least for now), and that's a nice form factor for a lot of things. This translates well into more sales of Android tablets in general, I think.
  • Apple will release an iPad 3, and it will be "more of the same". Trying to predict Apple is generally a lost cause, particularly when it comes to their vaunted iOS lines, but somewhere around the middle of the year would be ripe for a new iPad, at the very least. (With the iPhone 4S out a few months ago, it's hard to imagine they'd cannibalize those sales by releasing a new iPhone, until the end of the year at the earliest.) Frankly, though, I don't expect the iPad 3 to be all that big of a boost, just a faster processor, more storage, and probably about the same size. Probably the only thing I'd want added to the iPad would be a USB port, but that conflicts with the Apple desire to present the iPad as a "device", rather than as a "computer". (USB ports smack of "computers", not self-contained "devices".)
  • Apple will get hauled in front of the US government for... something. Apple's recent foray in the legal world, effectively informing Samsung that they can't make square phones and offering advice as to what will avoid future litigation, smacks of such hubris and arrogance, it makes Microsoft look like a Pollyanna Pushover by comparison. It is pretty much a given, it seems to me, that a confrontation in the legal halls is not far removed, either with the US or with the EU, over anti-cometitive behavior. (And if this kind of behavior continues, and there is no legal action, it'll be pretty apparent that Apple has a pretty good set of US Congressmen and Senators in their pocket, something they probably learned from watching Microsoft and IBM slug it out rather than just buy them off.)
  • IBM will be entirely irrelevant again. Look, IBM's main contribution to the Java world is/was Eclipse, and to a much lesser degree, Harmony. With Eclipse more or less "done" (aside from all the work on plugins being done by third parties), and with IBM abandoning Harmony in favor of OpenJDK, IBM more or less removes themselves from the game, as far as developers are concerned. Which shouldn't really be surprising--they've been more or less irrelevant pretty much ever since the mid-2000s or so.
  • Oracle will "screw it up" at least once. Right now, the Java community is poised, like a starving vulture, waiting for Oracle to do something else that demonstrates and befits their Evil Emperor status. The community has already been quick (far too quick, if you ask me) to highlight Oracle's supposed missteps, such as the JVM-crashing bug (which has already been fixed in the _u1 release of Java7, which garnered no attention from the various Java news sites) and the debacle around Hudson/Jenkins/whatever-the-heck-we-need-to-call-it-this-week. I'll grant you, the Hudson/Jenkins debacle was deserving of ire, but Oracle is hardly the Evil Emperor the community makes them out to be--at least, so far. (I'll admit it, though, I'm a touch biased, both because Brian Goetz is a friend of mine and because Oracle TechNet has asked me to write a column for them next year. Still, in the spirit of "innocent until proven guilty"....)
  • VMWare/SpringSource will start pushing their cloud solution in a major way. Companies like Microsoft and Google are pushing cloud solutions because Software-as-a-Service is a reoccurring revenue model, generating revenue even in years when the product hasn't incremented. VMWare, being a product company, is in the same boat--the only time they make money is when they sell a new copy of their product, unless they can start pushing their virtualization story onto hardware on behalf of clients--a.k.a. "the cloud". With SpringSource as the software stack, VMWare has a more-or-less complete cloud play, so it's surprising that they didn't push it harder in 2011; I suspect they'll start cramming it down everybody's throats in 2012. Expect to see Rod Johnson talking a lot about the cloud as a result.
  • JavaScript hype will continue to grow, and by years' end will be at near-backlash levels. JavaScript (more properly known as ECMAScript, not that anyone seems to care but me) is gaining all kinds of steam as a mainstream development language (as opposed to just-a-browser language), particularly with the release of NodeJS. That hype will continue to escalate, and by the end of the year we may start to see a backlash against it. (Speaking personally, NodeJS is an interesting solution, but suggesting that it will replace your Tomcat or IIS server is a bit far-fetched; event-driven I/O is something both of those servers have been doing for years, and the rest of it is "just" a language discussion. We could pretty easily use JavaScript as the development language inside both servers, as Sun demonstrated years ago with their "Phobos" project--not that anybody really cared back then.)
  • NoSQL buzz will continue to grow, and by years' end will start to generate a backlash. More and more companies are jumping into NoSQL-based solutions, and this trend will continue to accelerate, until some extremely public failure will start to generate a backlash against it. (This seems to be a pattern that shows up with a lot of technologies, so it seems entirely realistic that it'll happen here, too.) Mind you, I don't mean to suggest that the backlash will be factual or correct--usually these sorts of things come from misuing the tool, not from any intrinsic failure in it--but it'll generate some bad press.
  • Ted will thoroughly rock the house during his CodeMash keynote. Yeah, OK, that's more of a fervent wish than a prediction, but hey, keep a positive attitude and all that, right?
  • Ted will continue to enjoy his time working for Neudesic. So far, it's been great working for these guys, and I'm looking forward to a great 2012 with them. (Hopefully this will be a prediction I get to tack on for many years to come, too.)

I hope that all of you have enjoyed reading these, and I wish you and yours a very merry, happy, profitable and fulfilling 2012. Thanks for reading.


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Sunday, January 01, 2012 10:17:28 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Tuesday, December 27, 2011
Changes, changes, changes

Many of you have undoubtedly noticed that my blogging has dropped off precipitously over the last half-year. The reason for that is multifold, ranging from the usual “I just don’t seem to have the time for it” rationale, up through the realization that I have a couple of regular (paid) columns (one with CoDe Magazine, one with MSDN) that consume a lot of my ideas that would otherwise go into the blog.

But most of all, the main reason I’m finding it harder these days to blog is that as of July of this year, I have joined forces with Neudesic, LLC, as a full-time employee, working as an Architectural Consultant for them.

Neudesic is a Microsoft partner (as a matter of fact, as I understand it we were Microsoft’s Partner of the Year not too long ago), with several different technology practices, including a Mobile practice, a User Experience practice, a Connected Systems practice, and a Custom Application Development practice, among others. The company is (as of this writing) about 400 consultants strong, with a number of Microsoft MVPs and Regional Directors on staff, including a personal friend of mine, Simon Guest, who heads up the Mobile Practice, and another friend, Rick Garibay, who is the Practice Director for Connected Systems. And that doesn’t include the other friends I have within the company, as well as the people within the company who are quickly becoming new friends. I’m even more tickled that I was instrumental in bringing Steven “Doc” List in, to bring his agile experience and perspective to our projects nationwide. (Plus I just like working with Doc.)

It’s been a great partnership so far: they ask me to continue doing the speaking and writing that I love to do, bringing fame and glory (I hope!) to the Neudesic name, and in turn I get to jump in on a variety of different projects as an architect and mentor. The people I’m working with are great, top-notch technology experts and just some of the nicest people I’ve met. Plus, yes, it’s nice to draw a regular bimonthly paycheck and benefits after being an independent for a decade or so.

The fact that they’re principally a .NET shop may lead some to conclude that this is my farewell letter to the Java community, but in fact the opposite is the case. I’m actively engaged with our Mobile practice around Android (and iOS) development, and I’m subtly and covertly (sssh! Don’t tell the partners!) trying to subvert the company into expanding our technology practices into the Java (and Ruby/Rails) space.

With the coming new year, I think one of my upcoming responsibilities will be to blog more, so don’t be too surprised if you start to see more activity on a more regular basis here. But in the meantime, I’m working on my end-of-year predictions and retrospective, so keep an eye out for that in the next few days.

(Oh, and that link that appears across the bottom of my blog posts? Someday I’m going to remember how to change the text for that in the blog engine and modify it to read something more Neudesic-centric. But for now, it’ll work.)


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Tuesday, December 27, 2011 1:53:14 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Friday, May 27, 2011
“Vietnam” in Belorussian

Recently I got an email from Bohdan Zograf, who offered:

Hi!

I'm willing to translate publication located at http://blogs.tedneward.com/2006/06/26/The+Vietnam+Of+Computer+Science.aspx to the Belorussian language (my mother tongue). What I'm asking for is your written permission, so you don't mind after I'll post the translation to my blog.

I agreed, and next thing I know, I get the next email that it’s done. If your mother tongue is Belorussian, then I invite you to read the article in its translated form at http://www.moneyaisle.com/worldwide/the-vietnam-of-computer-science-be.

Thanks, Bohdan!


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Friday, May 27, 2011 12:01:45 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Saturday, January 01, 2011
Tech Predictions, 2011 Edition

Long-time readers of this blog know what’s coming next: it’s time for Ted to prognosticate on what the coming year of tech will bring us. But I believe strongly in accountability, even in my offered-up-for-free predictions, so one of the traditions of this space is to go back and revisit my predictions from this time last year. So, without further ado, let’s look back at Ted’s 2010 predictions, and see how things played out; 2010 predictions are prefixed with “THEN”, and my thoughts on my predictions are prefixed with “NOW”:

For 2010, I predicted....

  • THEN: ... I will offer 3- and 4-day training classes on F# and Scala, among other things. OK, that's not fair—yes, I have the materials, I just need to work out locations and times. Contact me if you're interested in a private class, by the way.
    • NOW: Well, I offered them… I just didn’t do much to advertise them or sell them. I got plenty busy just with the other things I had going on. Besides, this and the next prediction were pretty much all advertisement anyway, so I don’t know if anybody really counts these two.
  • THEN: ... I will publish two books, one on F# and one on Scala. OK, OK, another plug. Or, rather, more of a resolution. One will be the "Professional F#" I'm doing for Wiley/Wrox, the other isn't yet finalized. But it'll either be published through a publisher, or self-published, by JavaOne 2010.
    • NOW: “Professional F# 2.0” shipped in Q3 of 2010; the other Scala book I decided not to pursue—too much stuff going on to really put the necessary time into it. (Cue sad trombone.)
  • THEN: ... DSLs will either "succeed" this year, or begin the short slide into the dustbin of obscure programming ideas. Domain-specific language advocates have to put up some kind of strawman for developers to learn from and poke at, or the whole concept will just fade away. Martin's book will help, if it ships this year, but even that might not be enough to generate interest if it doesn't have some kind of large-scale applicability in it. Patterns and refactoring and enterprise containers all had a huge advantage in that developers could see pretty easily what the problem was they solved; DSLs haven't made that clear yet.
    • NOW: To be honest, this one is hard to call. Martin Fowler published his DSL book, which many people consider to be a good sign of what’s happening in the world, but really, the DSL buzz seems to have dropped off significantly. The strawman hasn’t appeared in any meaningful public way (I still don’t see an example being offered up from anybody), and that leads me to believe that the fading-away has started.
  • THEN: ... functional languages will start to see a backlash. I hate to say it, but "getting" the functional mindset is hard, and there's precious few resources that are making it easy for mainstream (read: O-O) developers make that adjustment, far fewer than there was during the procedural-to-object shift. If the functional community doesn't want to become mainstream, then mainstream developers will find ways to take functional's most compelling gateway use-case (parallel/concurrent programming) and find a way to "git 'er done" in the traditional O-O approach, probably through software transactional memory, and functional languages like Haskell and Erlang will be relegated to the "What Might Have Been" of computer science history. Not sure what I mean? Try this: walk into a functional language forum, and ask what a monad is. Nobody yet has been able to produce an answer that doesn't involve math theory, or that does involve a practical domain-object-based example. In fact, nobody has really said why (or if) monads are even still useful. Or catamorphisms. Or any of the other dime-store words that the functional community likes to toss around.
    • NOW: I think I have to admit that this hasn’t happened—at least, there’s been no backlash that I’ve seen. In fact, what’s interesting is that there’s been some movement to bring those functional concepts—including monads, which surprised me completely—into other languages like C# or Java for discussion and use. That being said, though, I don’t see Haskell and Erlang taking center stage as application languages—instead, I see them taking supporting-cast kinds of roles building other infrastructure that applications in turn make use of, a la CouchDB (written in Erlang). Monads still remain a mostly-opaque subject for most developers, however, and it’s still unclear if monads are something that people should think about applying in code, or if they are one of those “in theory” kinds of concepts. (You know, one of those ideas that change your brain forever, but you never actually use directly in code.)
  • THEN: ... Visual Studio 2010 will ship on time, and be one of the buggiest and/or slowest releases in its history. I hate to make this prediction, because I really don't want to be right, but there's just so much happening in the Visual Studio refactoring effort that it makes me incredibly nervous. Widespread adoption of VS2010 will wait until SP1 at the earliest. In fact....
    • NOW: Wow, did I get a few people here in Redmond annoyed with me about that one. And, as it turned out, I was pretty off-base about its stability. (It shipped pretty close if not exactly on the ship date Microsoft promised, as I recall, though I admit I wasn’t paying too much attention to it.)  I’ve been using VS 2010 for a lot of .NET work in the last six months, and I’ve yet (knock on wood) to have it crash on me. /bow Visual Studio team.
  • THEN: ... Visual Studio 2010 SP 1 will ship within three months of the final product. Microsoft knows that people wait until SP 1 to think about upgrading, so they'll just plan for an eager SP 1 release, and hope that managers will be too hung over from the New Year (still) to notice that the necessary shakeout time hasn't happened.
    • NOW: Uh…. nope. In fact, SP 1 has just reached a beta/CTP state. As for managers being too hung over, well…
  • THEN: ... Apple will ship a tablet with multi-touch on it, and it will flop horribly. Not sure why I think this, but I just don't think the multi-touch paradigm that Apple has cooked up for the iPhone will carry over to a tablet/laptop device. That won't stop them from shipping it, and it won't stop Apple fan-boiz from buying it, but that's about where the interest will end.
    • NOW: Oh, WOW did I come so close and yet missed the mark by a mile. Of course, the “tablet” that Apple shipped was the iPad, and it did pretty much everything except flop horribly. Apple fan-boys bought it… and then about 24 hours later, so did everybody else. My mom got one, for crying out loud. And folks, the iPad—along with the whole “slate” concept—is pretty clearly here to stay.
  • THEN: ... JDK 7 closures will be debated for a few weeks, then become a fait accompli as the Java community shrugs its collective shoulders. Frankly, I think the Java community has exhausted its interest in debating new language features for Java. Recent college grads and open-source groups with an axe to grind will continue to try and make an issue out of this, but I think the overall Java community just... doesn't... care. They just want to see JDK 7 ship someday.
    • NOW: Pretty close—except that closures won’t ship as part of JDK 7, largely due to the Oracle acquisition in the middle of the year here. And I was spot-on vis-à-vis the “they want to see JDK 7 ship someday”; when given the chance to wait for a year or so for a Java-with-closures to ship, the community overwhelmingly voted to get something sooner rather than later.
  • THEN: ... Scala either "pops" in 2010, or begins to fall apart. By "pops", I mean reaches a critical mass of developers interested in using it, enough to convince somebody to create a company around it, a la G2One.
    • NOW: … and by “somebody”, it turns out I meant Martin Odersky. Scala is pretty clearly a hot topic in the Java space, its buzz being disturbed only by Clojure. Scala and/or Clojure, plus Groovy, makes a really compelling JVM-based stack.
  • THEN: ... Oracle is going to make a serious "cloud" play, probably by offering an Oracle-hosted version of Azure or AppEngine. Oracle loves the enterprise space too much, and derives too much money from it, to not at least appear to have some kind of offering here. Now that they own Java, they'll marry it up against OpenSolaris, the Oracle database, and throw the whole thing into a series of server centers all over the continent, and call it "Oracle 12c" (c for Cloud, of course) or something.
    • NOW: Oracle made a play, but it was to continue to enhance Java, not build a cloud space. It surprises me that they haven’t made a more forceful move in this space, but I suspect that a huge amount of time and energy went into folding Sun into their corporate environment.
  • THEN: ... Spring development will slow to a crawl and start to take a left turn toward cloud ideas. VMWare bought SpringSource for a reason, and I believe it's entirely centered around VMWare's movement into the cloud space—they want to be more than "just" a virtualization tool. Spring + Groovy makes a compelling development stack, particularly if VMWare does some interesting hooks-n-hacks to make Spring a virtualization environment in its own right somehow. But from a practical perspective, any community-driven development against Spring is all but basically dead. The source may be downloadable later, like the VMWare Player code is, but making contributions back? Fuhgeddabowdit.
    • NOW: The Spring One show definitely played up Cloud stuff, and springsource.com seems to be emphasizing cloud more in a couple of subtle ways. Not sure if I call this one a win or not for me, though.
  • THEN: ... the explosion of e-book readers brings the Kindle 2009 edition way down to size. The era of the e-book reader is here, and honestly, while I'm glad I have a Kindle, I'm expecting that I'll be dusting it off a shelf in a few years. Kinda like I do with my iPods from a few years ago.
    • NOW: Honestly, can’t say that I’m using my Kindle a lot, but I am reading using the Kindle app on non-Kindle hardware more than I thought I would be. That said, I am eyeing the new Kindle hardware generation with an acquisitive eye…
  • THEN: ... "social networking" becomes the "Web 2.0" of 2010. In other words, using the term will basically identify you as a tech wannabe and clearly out of touch with the bleeding edge.
    • NOW: Um…. yeah.
  • THEN: ... Facebook becomes a developer platform requirement. I don't pretend to know anything about Facebook—I'm not even on it, which amazes my family to no end—but clearly Facebook is one of those mechanisms by which people reach each other, and before long, it'll start showing up as a developer requirement for companies looking to hire. If you're looking to build out your resume to make yourself attractive to companies in 2010, mad Facebook skillz might not be a bad investment.
    • NOW: I’m on Facebook, I’ve written some code for it, and given how much the startup scene loves the “Like” button, I think developers who knew Facebook in 2010 did pretty well for themselves.
  • THEN: ... Nintendo releases an open SDK for building games for its next-gen DS-based device. With the spectacular success of games on the iPhone, Nintendo clearly must see that they're missing a huge opportunity every day developers can't write games for the Nintendo DS that are easily downloadable to the device for playing. Nintendo is not stupid—if they don't open up the SDK and promote "casual" games like those on the iPhone and those that can now be downloaded to the Zune or the XBox, they risk being marginalized out of existence.
    • NOW: Um… yeah. Maybe this was me just being hopeful.

In general, it looks like I was more right than wrong, which is not a bad record to have. Of course, a couple of those “wrong”s were “giving up the big play” kind of wrongs, so while I may have a winning record, I still may have a defense that’s given up too many points to be taken seriously. *shrug* Oh, well.

What portends for 2011?

  • Android’s penetration into the mobile space is going to rise, then plateau around the middle of the year. Android phones, collectively, have outpaced iPhone sales. That’s a pretty significant statistic—and it means that there’s fewer customers buying smartphones in the coming year. More importantly, the first generation of Android slates (including the Galaxy Tab, which I own), are less-than-sublime, and not really an “iPad Killer” device by any stretch of the imagination. And I think that will slow down people buying Android slates and phones, particularly since Google has all but promised that Android releases will start slowing down.
  • Windows Phone 7 penetration into the mobile space will appear huge, then slow down towards the middle of the year. Microsoft is getting some pretty decent numbers now, from what I can piece together, and I think that’s largely the “I love Microsoft” crowd buying in. But it’s a pretty crowded place right now with Android and iPhone, and I’m not sure if the much-easier Office and/or Exchange integration is enough to woo consumers (who care about Office) or business types (who care about Exchange) away from their Androids and iPhones.
  • Android, iOS and/or Windows Phone 7 becomes a developer requirement. Developers, if you haven’t taken the time to learn how to program one of these three platforms, you are electing to remove yourself from a growing market that desperately wants people with these skills. I see the “mobile native app development” space as every bit as hot as the “Internet/Web development” space was back in 2000. If you don’t have a device, buy one. If you have a device, get the tools—in all three cases they’re free downloads—and start writing stupid little apps that nobody cares about, so you can have some skills on the platform when somebody cares about it.
  • The Windows 7 slates will suck. This isn’t a prediction, this is established fact. I played with an “ExoPC” 10” form factor slate running Windows 7 (Dell I think was the manufacturer), and it was a horrible experience. Windows 7, like most OSes, really expects a keyboard to be present, and a slate doesn’t have one—so the OS was hacked to put a “keyboard” button at the top of the screen that would slide out to let you touch-type on the slate. I tried to fire up Notepad and type out a haiku, and it was an unbelievably awkward process. Android and iOS clearly own the slate market for the forseeable future, and if Dell has any brains in its corporate head, it will phone up Google tomorrow and start talking about putting Android on that hardware.
  • DSLs mostly disappear from the buzz. I still see no strawman (no “pet store” equivalent), and none of the traditional builders-of-strawmen (Microsoft, Oracle, etc) appear interested in DSLs much anymore, so I think 2010 will mark the last year that we spent any time talking about the concept.
  • Facebook becomes more of a developer requirement than before. I don’t like Mark Zuckerburg. I don’t like Facebook’s privacy policies. I don’t particularly like the way Facebook approaches the Facebook Connect experience. But Facebook owns enough people to be the fourth-largest nation on the planet, and probably commands an economy of roughly that size to boot. If your app is aimed at the Facebook demographic (that is, everybody who’s not on Twitter), you have to know how to reach these people, and that means developing at least some part of your system to integrate with it.
  • Twitter becomes more of a developer requirement, too. Anybody who’s not on Facebook is on Twitter. Or dead. So to reach the other half of the online community, you have to know how to connect out with Twitter.
  • XMPP becomes more of a developer requirement. XMPP hasn’t crossed a lot of people’s radar screen before, but Facebook decided to adopt it as their chat system communication protocol, and Google’s already been using it, and suddenly there’s a whole lotta traffic going over XMPP. More importantly, it offers a two-way communication experience that is in some scenarios vastly better than what HTTP offers, yet running in a very “Internet-friendly” way just as HTTP does. I suspect that XMPP is going to start cropping up in a number of places as a useful alternative and/or complement to using HTTP.
  • “Gamification” starts making serious inroads into non-gaming systems. Maybe it’s just because I’ve been talking more about gaming, game design, and game implementation last year, but all of a sudden “gamification”—the process of putting game-like concepts into non-game applications—is cresting in a big way. FourSquare, Yelp, Gowalla, suddenly all these systems are offering achievement badges and scoring systems for people who want to play in their worlds. How long is it before a developer is pulled into a meeting and told that “we need to put achievement badges into the call-center support application”? Or the online e-commerce portal? It’ll start either this year or next.
  • Functional languages will hit a make-or-break point. I know, I said it last year. But the buzz keeps growing, and when that happens, it usually means that it’s either going to reach a critical mass and explode, or it’s going to implode—and the longer the buzz grows, the faster it explodes or implodes, accordingly. My personal guess is that the “F/O hybrids”—F#, Scala, etc—will continue to grow until they explode, particularly since the suggested v.Next changes to both Java and C# have to be done as language changes, whereas futures for F# frequently are either built as libraries masquerading as syntax (such as asynchronous workflows, introduced in 2.0) or as back-end library hooks that anybody can plug in (such as type providers, introduced at PDC a few months ago), neither of which require any language revs—and no concerns about backwards compatibility with existing code. This makes the F/O hybrids vastly more flexible and stable. In fact, I suspect that within five years or so, we’ll start seeing a gradual shift away from pure O-O systems, into systems that use a lot more functional concepts—and that will propel the F/O languages into the center of the developer mindshare.
  • The Microsoft Kinect will lose its shine. I hate to say it, but I just don’t see where the excitement is coming from. Remember when the Wii nunchucks were the most amazing thing anybody had ever seen? Frankly, after a slew of initial releases for the Wii that made use of them in interesting ways, the buzz has dropped off, and more importantly, the nunchucks turned out to be just another way to move an arrow around on the screen—in other words, we haven’t found particularly novel and interesting/game-changing ways to use the things. That’s what I think will happen with the Kinect. Sure, it’s really freakin’ cool that you can use your body as the controller—but how precise is it, how quickly can it react to my body movements, and most of all, what new user interface metaphors are people going to have to come up with in order to avoid the “me-too” dancing-game clones that are charging down the pipeline right now?
  • There will be no clear victor in the Silverlight-vs-HTML5 war. And make no mistake about it, a war is brewing. Microsoft, I think, finds itself in the inenviable position of having two very clearly useful technologies, each one’s “sphere of utility” (meaning, the range of answers to the “where would I use it?” question) very clearly overlapping. It’s sort of like being a football team with both Brett Favre and Tom Brady on your roster—both of them are superstars, but you know, deep down, that you have to cut one, because you can’t devote the same degree of time and energy to both. Microsoft is going to take most of 2011 and probably part of 2012 trying to support both, making a mess of it, offering up conflicting rationale and reasoning, in the end achieving nothing but confusing developers and harming their relationship with the Microsoft developer community in the process. Personally, I think Microsoft has no choice but to get behind HTML 5, but I like a lot of the features of Silverlight and think that it has a lot of mojo that HTML 5 lacks, and would actually be in favor of Microsoft keeping both—so long as they make it very clear to the developer community when and where each should be used. In other words, the executives in charge of each should be locked into a room and not allowed out until they’ve hammered out a business strategy that is then printed and handed out to every developer within a 3-continent radius of Redmond. (Chances of this happening: .01%)
  • Apple starts feeling the pressure to deliver a developer experience that isn’t mired in mid-90’s metaphor. Don’t look now, Apple, but a lot of software developers are coming to your platform from Java and .NET, and they’re bringing their expectations for what and how a developer IDE should look like, perform, and do, with them. Xcode is not a modern IDE, all the Apple fan-boy love for it notwithstanding, and this means that a few things will happen:
    • Eclipse gets an iOS plugin. Yes, I know, it wouldn’t work (for the most part) on a Windows-based Eclipse installation, but if Eclipse can have a native C/C++ developer experience, then there’s no reason why a Mac Eclipse install couldn’t have an Objective-C plugin, and that opens up the idea of using Eclipse to write iOS and/or native Mac apps (which will be critical when the Mac App Store debuts somewhere in 2011 or 2012).
    • Rumors will abound about Microsoft bringing Visual Studio to the Mac. Silverlight already runs on the Mac; why not bring the native development experience there? I’m not saying they’ll actually do it, and certainly not in 2011, but the rumors, they will be flyin….
    • Other third-party alternatives to Xcode will emerge and/or grow. MonoTouch is just one example. There’s opportunity here, just as the fledgling Java IDE market looked back in ‘96, and people will come to fill it.
  • NoSQL buzz grows. The NoSQL movement, which sort of got started last year, will reach significant states of buzz this year. NoSQL databases have a lot to offer, particularly in areas that relational databases are weak, such as hierarchical kinds of storage requirements, for example. That buzz will reach a fever pitch this year, and the relational database moguls (Microsoft, Oracle, IBM) will start to fight back.

I could probably go on making a few more, but I think these are enough to get me into trouble for the year.

To all of you who’ve been readers of this blog for the past year, I thank you—blog-gathered statistics tell me that I get, on average, about 7,000 hits a day, which just stuns me—and it is a New Years’ Resolution that I blog more and give you even more reason to stick around. Happy New Year, and may your 2011 be just as peaceful, prosperous, and eventful as you want it to be.


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Saturday, January 01, 2011 2:27:11 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Monday, December 13, 2010
Thoughts on my first Startup Weekend

Startup Weekend came to Redmond this weekend, and as I write this it is all of three hours over. In the spirit of capturing post-mortem thoughts as quickly as possible, I thought I’d blog my reactions and thoughts from it, both as a reference for myself for the next one, and as a guide/warning/data point for others considering doing it.

A few weeks ago, emails started crossing the Seattle Tech Startup mailing list about this thing called “Startup Weekend”. I didn’t do a whole lot of research around it—just glanced at the website, and asked a few questions of the organizer in an email. Specifically, I wanted to know that as a tech guy, with no specific startup ideas, I would find something to do. I was reassured immediately that, in fact, as a tech guy, I would be “heavily recruited” by others at the event who were business types.

First takeaway: I can’t speak for all the events, this being my first, but it was a surprise, nay, a shock, to me just how many “business” and/or “marketing” types were at this event. I seriously expected that tech folks would outnumber the non-tech folks by a substantial margin, but it was exactly the opposite, probably on the order of 2 to 1. As a developer, I was definitely being courted, rather than hunting for a team to find a way to make room for me. It was refreshing, exciting and a little overwhelming at the same time.

The format of the event is interesting: anybody can pitch an idea, then everybody in the room is free to “attach” themselves to that idea to form a team to implement it somehow, sort of a “Law of Two Feet” applied to team-building.

Second takeaway: Have a pretty clear idea of what you want to do here. The ideas initially all sound pretty good, and choosing between them can actually be quite painful and difficult. Have a clear goal for yourself what you want out of the weekend—to socialize, to stretch yourself, to build a business, whatever. Mine were (1) just to be here and experience the event, (2) to socialize and network more deeply with the startup scene, (3) to hack on some code and try to ship something, and (4) to learn some new tech that I hadn’t had the chance to use beyond a “Hello World” demo before. There was always the chance I wouldn’t get any of those things, in which case I accepted a consolation prize of simply watching how the event was structured and run, since it operates in many ways on the same basic concept that  GiveCamp does, which is something I want to see done in Seattle sooner rather than later. So just by going and watching the event as a uninvolved observer was worth the price of admission, so once I’d walked through the door, I’d already met my #1 win condition.

I realized as I was choosing which team to join that I didn’t want to be paired alone with the project-pitching person (whomever that would be), since I had no idea how this event worked or what we were going for, so I deliberately turned away from a few projects that sounded interesting. I ended up as part of a team that was pretty well spread-out in terms of skillsets/interests (Chris, developer and “original idea guy”, Libby, business development, Maizer, also business development, Mohammed, small businessman, and Aaron, graphic designer), working on an idea around “social bar gaming”. In other words, we had a nebulous fuzzy idea about using games on a mobile device to help people in bars connect to other people in bars via some kind of “scavenger hunt” or similar social-engagement game. I had suggested that maybe one feature or idea would be to help groups of hard-drinking souls chart their path between bars (something like a Traveling Saleman’s Problem meets a PubCrawl), and Chris thought that was definitely something to consider. We laid out a brief idea of what it was we wanted to build, then parted ways Friday night about midnight or so, except for Chris and myself, who headed out to Denny’s to mull over some technology ideas for a while, until about 3 AM in the morning.

Third takeaway: Hoard the nighttime hours on Friday, to spend them working on the app the rest of the weekend. Even though you’re full of energy Friday night, rarin’ to go, bank it because you’ll need to be well-rested for the marathon that is Saturday and Sunday.

Chris and I briefly discussed the technology approaches we could use, and settled in on using Azure for the backplane, mostly because I felt it would be the quickest way to get us provisioned on a server, and it was an excuse for me to play with Azure, something I haven’t had much of a chance to do beyond simple demos. We also thought that having some kind of Facebook integration would be a good idea, depending on what we actually wanted to do with the idea. I thought to myself, “OK, so this is going to be interesting for me—I’m going to be actually ‘stretching’ on three things simultaneously: Azure, Facebook, and whatever Web framework we use to build this”, since I haven’t done much Web work in .NET in many, many years, and don’t consider myself “up to speed” on either ASP.NET or ASP.NET MVC. Chris was a “front to middle tier” guy, though, so I figured I’d focus on the Azure back-end parts—storage, queueing, etc—and maybe the Facebook integration, and we’d be good.

By Saturday morning, thanks to a few other things I had to do after Chris left, I got there a bit late—about 10:30—fully expecting that the team had a pretty clear app vision laid out and ready for Chris and I to execute on. Alas, not quite—we were still sort of thrashing on what exactly we wanted to build—specifically, we kept bouncing back and forth between what the game would be and how it would be monetized. If we wanted to sell to bars as a way to get more bodies in the door, then we needed some kind of “check-in” game where people earned points for bringing friends to the bar. Or we could sell to bars by creating a game that was a kind of “scavenger hunt”, forcing patrons to discover things about the bar or about new drinks the bar sells, and so on. But we also wanted a game that was intrinsically social, forcing peoples’ eyes away from the screens and up towards the other patrons—otherwise why play the game?

Aaron, a two-time veteran of Startup Weekend, suggested that we finalize our vision by 11 AM so we could start hacking. By 11 AM, we had a vision… until about an hour later, when I realized that Libby, Chris, Maizer, and Mohammed were changing the game to suit new monetization ideas. We set another deadline for 2 PM, at which point we had a vision…. until about an hour later again, when I looked up again and found them discussing again what kind of game we wanted to build. In the end, it wasn’t until 7 or 8 PM Saturday when we finally nailed down some kind of game app idea—and then only because Aaron came out of his shell a little and politely yelled at the group for wasting all of our time.

Fourth takeaway: Know what’s clear and unclear about your vision/idea. I think we didn’t realize how nebulous our ideas were until we started trying to put game mechanics around it, and that was what led to all the thrashing on ideas.

Fifth takeaway: Put somebody in charge. Have a dictator in place. Yes, everybody wants to be polite and yes, choosing a leader can be a bit uncomfortable, but having that final unambiguous deciding vote—a leader—who can make decisions and isn’t afraid to do so would have saved us a lot of headache and gotten us much more quickly down the path. Libby said it best in our little post-mortem at the bar afterwards: Don’t you dare leave Friday night until everybody is 100% clear on what you’re building.

Meanwhile, on the technical front, another warm front was meeting another cold front and developing into a storm. When we’d decided to use Azure, I had suggested it over Google App Engine because Chris had said he’d done some development with it before, so I figured he was comfortable with it and ready to go. As we started pulling out laptops to start working, though, Chris mentioned that he needed to spin up a virtual machine with Windows 7, Visual Studio, and the Azure tools in it. No worries—I needed some time to read up on Azure provisioning, data storage, and so on.

Unfortunately, setting up the VM took until about 8 PM Saturday night, meaning we lost 11 of our 15 hours (9 AM to midnight) for that day.

Sixth takeaway: Have your tools ready to go before you get there. Find a hosting provider—come on, everybody is going to need a hosting provider, even if you build a mobile app—and have a virtual machine or laptop configured with every dev tool you can think of, ready to go. Getting stuff downloaded and installed is burning a very precious commodity that you don’t have nearly enough of: time.

Seventh takeaway: Be clear about your personal motivation/win conditions for the weekend. Yes, I wanted to explore a new tech, but Chris took that to mean that I wasn’t going to succeed if we abandoned Azure, and as a result, we burned close to 50% of our development cycles prepping a VM just so I could put Azure on my resume. I would’ve happily redacted that line on my resume in exchange for getting us up and running by 11 AM Saturday morning, particularly because it became clear to me that others in the group were running with win conditions of “spin up a legitimate business startup idea”, and I had already met most of my win conditions for the weekend by this point. I should’ve mentioned this much earlier, but didn’t realize what was happening until a chance comment Chris made in passing Saturday night when we left for the night.

Sunday I got in about noonish, owing to a long day, short night, and forgotten cell phone (alarm clock) in the car. By the time I got there, tempers were starting to flare because we were clearly well behind the curve. Chris had been up all night working on HTML forms for the game, Aaron had been up all night creating some (amazing!) graphics for the game, I had been up a significant part of the night diving into Facebook APIs, and I think we all sensed that this was in real danger of falling apart. Unfortunately, we couldn’t even split the work between Chris and I, because we had (foolishly) not bothered to get some kind of source-control server going for the code so we could work in parallel.

See the sixth takeaway. It applies to source-control servers, too. And source-control clients, while we’re at it.

We were slotted to present our app and business idea first, as it turned out, which was my preference—I figured that if we went first, we might set a high bar that other groups would have a hard time matching. (That turned out to be a really false hope—the other groups’ work was amazing.) The group asked me to make the pitch, which was fine with me—when have I ever turned down the chance to work a crowd?

But our big concern was the demo—we’d originally called for a “feature freeze” at 4PM, so we would have time to put the app on the server and test it, but by 4:15 Chris was still stitching pages together and putting images on pages. In fact, the push to the Azure server for v0.1 of our app happened about about 5:15, a full 30 seconds before I started the pitch.

The pitch itself was deliberately simple: we put Libby on a bar stool facing the crowd, Mohammed standing against a wall, and said, “Ever been in a bar, wanting to strike up a conversation with that cute girl at the far table? With Pubbn, we give you an excuse—a social scavenger hunt—to strike up a conversation with her, or earn some points, or win a discount from the bar, or more. We want to take the usual social networking premise—pushing socialization into the network—and instead flip it on its ear—using the network to make it easier to socialize.” It was a nice pitch, but I forgot to tell people to download the app and try it during the demo, which left some people thinking we never actually finished anything. ACK.

Pubbn, by the way, was our app name, derived (obviously) from “going pubbing”, as in, going out to drink and socialize. I loved this name. It’s up at http://www.pubbn.com, but I’ll warn you now, it’s a static mockup and a far cry from what we wanted to end up with—in fact, I’ll go out on a limb and say that of all the projects, ours was by far the weakest technical achievement, and I lay the blame for that at my feet. I should’ve stepped up and taken more firm control of the development so Chris could focus more on the overall picture.

The eventual winners for the weekend were “Doodle-A-Doodle”, a fantastic learn-to-draw app for kids on the iPad; “Hold It!”, a game about standing in line in the mens’ room; and “CamBadge”, a brilliant little iPhone app for creating a conference badge on your phone, hanging your phone around your neck, and snapping a picture of the person standing in front of you with a single touch to the screen (assuming, of course, you have an iPhone 4 with its front-facing camera).

“CamBadge” was one of the apps I thought about working on, but passed on it because it didn’t seem challenging enough technologically. Clearly that was a foolish choice from a business perspective, but this is why knowing what your win conditions for the weekend are so important—I didn’t necessarily want to build a new business out of this weekend, and, to me, the more important “win” was to make a social connection with the people who looked like good folks to know in this space—and the “CamBadge” principal, Adam, clearly fit that bill. Drinking with him was far more important—to me—than building an app with him. Next Startup Weekend, my win conditions might be different, and if so, I’d make an entirely different decision.

In the end, Startup Weekend was a blast, and something I thoroughly recommend every developer who’s ever thought of going independent do. The cost is well, well worth the experience, and if you fail miserably, well, better to do that here, with so little invested, than to fail later in a “real” startup with millions attached.

By the way, Startup Weekend Redmond was/is #swred on Twitter, if you want to see the buzz that came out of it. Particularly good reading are the Tweets starting at about 5 PM tonight, because that’s when the presentations started.


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Monday, December 13, 2010 1:53:24 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Wednesday, September 08, 2010
VMWare help

Hey, anybody who’s got significant VMWare mojo, help out a bro?

I’ve got a Win7 VM (one of many) that appears to be exhibiting weird disk behavior—the vmdk, a growable single-file VMDK, is almost precisely twice the used space. It’s a 120GB growable disk, and the Win7 guest reports about 35GB used, but the VMDK takes about 70GB on host disk. CHKDSK inside Windows says everything’s good, and the VMWare “Disk Cleanup” doesn’t change anything, either. It doesn’t seem to be a Windows7 thing, because I’ve got a half-dozen other Win7 VMs that operate… well, normally (by which I mean, 30GB used in the VMDK means 30GB used on disk). It’s a VMWare Fusion host, if that makes any difference. Any other details that might be relevant, let me know and I’ll post.

Anybody got any ideas what the heck is going on inside this disk?


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Wednesday, September 08, 2010 8:53:01 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Thursday, June 17, 2010
Architectural Katas

By now, the Twitter messages have spread, and the word is out: at Uberconf this year, I did a session ("Pragmatic Architecture"), which I've done at other venues before, but this time we made it into a 180-minute workshop instead of a 90-minute session, and the workshop included breaking the room up into small (10-ish, which was still a teensy bit too big) groups and giving each one an "architectural kata" to work on.

The architectural kata is a take on PragDave's coding kata, except taken to a higher level: the architectural kata is an exercise in which the group seeks to create an architecture to solve the problem presented. The inspiration for this came from Frederick Brooks' latest book, The Design of Design, in which he points out that the only way to get great designers is to get them to design. The corollary, of course, is that in order to create great architects, we have to get them to architect. But few architects get a chance to architect a system more than a half-dozen times or so over the lifetime of a career, and that's only for those who are fortunate to be given the opportunity to architect in the first place. Of course, the problem here is, you have to be an architect in order to get hired as an architect, but if you're not an architect, then how can you architect in order to become an architect?

Um... hang on, let me make sure I wrote that right.

Anyway, the "rules" around the kata (which makes it more difficult to consume the kata but makes the scenario more realistic, IMHO):

  • you may ask the instructor questions about the project
  • you must be prepared to present a rough architectural vision of the project and defend questions about it
  • you must be prepared to ask questions of other participants' presentations
  • you may safely make assumptions about technologies you don't know well as long as those assumptions are clearly defined and spelled out
  • you may not assume you have hiring/firing authority over the development team
  • any technology is fair game (but you must justify its use)
  • any other rules, you may ask about

The groups were given 30 minutes in which to formulate some ideas, and then three of them were given a few minutes to present their ideas and defend it against some questions from the crowd.

An example kata is below:

Architectural Kata #5: I'll have the BLT

a national sandwich shop wants to enable "fax in your order" but over the Internet instead

users: millions+

requirements: users will place their order, then be given a time to pick up their sandwich and directions to the shop (which must integrate with Google Maps); if the shop offers a delivery service, dispatch the driver with the sandwich to the user; mobile-device accessibility; offer national daily promotionals/specials; offer local daily promotionals/specials; accept payment online or in person/on delivery

As you can tell, it's vague in some ways, and this is somewhat deliberate—as one group discovered, part of the architect's job is to ask questions of the project champion (me), and they didn't, and felt like they failed pretty miserably. (In their defense, the kata they drew—randomly—was pretty much universally thought to be the hardest of the lot.) But overall, the exercise was well-received, lots of people found it a great opportunity to try being an architect, and even the team that failed felt that it was a valuable exercise.

I'm definitely going to do more of these, and refine the whole thing a little. (Thanks to everyone who participated and gave me great feedback on how to make it better.) If you're interested in having it done as a practice exercise for your development team before the start of a big project, ping me. I think this would be a *great* exercise to do during a user group meeting, too.


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Thursday, June 17, 2010 1:42:47 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Monday, May 10, 2010
Code Kata: RoboStack

Code Katas are small, relatively simple exercises designed to give you a problem to try and solve. I like to use them as a way to get my feet wet and help write something more interesting than "Hello World" but less complicated than "The Internet's Next Killer App".

 

This one is from the UVa online programming contest judge system, which I discovered after picking up the book Programming Challenges, which is highly recommended as a source of code katas, by the way. Much of the advice parts of the book can be skimmed or ignored by the long-time professional developer, but it's still worth a read, since it can be an interesting source of ideas and approaches when solving real-world scenarios.

 

Problem: You work for a manufacturing company, and they have just received their newest piece of super-modern hardware, a highly efficient assembly-line mechanized pneumatic item manipulator, also known in some circles as a "robotic arm". It is driven by a series of commands, and your job is to write the software to drive the arm. The initial test will be to have the arm move a series of blocks around.

 

Context: The test begins with n number of blocks, laid out sequentially next to each other, each block with a number on it. (You may safely assume that n never exceeds 25.) So, if n is 4, then the blocks are laid out (starting from 0) as:

0: 0

1: 1

2: 2

3: 3

The display output here is the block-numbered "slot", then a colon, then the block(s) that are stacked in that slot, lowest to highest in left to right order. Thus, in the following display:

0:

1:

2: 0 1 2 3

3:

The 3 block is stacked on top of the 2 block is stacked on top of the 1 block is stacked on top of the 0 block, all in slot 2. This can be shortened to the representation [0:, 1:, 2: 0 1 2 3, 3:] for conciseness.

 

The arm understands a number of different commands, as well as an optic sensor. (Yeah, the guys who created the arm were good enough to write code that knows how to read the number off a block, but not to actually drive the arm. Go figure.) The commands are as follows, where a and b are valid block numbers (meaning they are between 0 and n-1):

  • "move a onto b" This command orders the arm to find block a, and return any blocks stacked on top of it to their original position. Do the same for block b, then stack block a on top of b.
  • "move a over b" This command orders the arm to find block a, and return any blocks stacked on top of it to their original position. Then stack block a on top of the stack of blocks containing b.
  • "pile a onto b" This command orders the arm to find the stack of blocks containing block b, and return any blocks stacked on top of it to their original position. Then the arm must find the stack of blocks containing block a, and take the stack of blocks starting from a on upwards (in other words, don't do anything with any blocks on top of a) and put that stack on top of block b.
  • "pile a over b" This command orders the arm to find the stack of blocks containing block a and take the stack of blocks starting from a on upwards (in other words, don't do anything with any blocks on top of a) and put that stack on top of the stack of blocks containing block b (in other words, don't do anything with the stack of blocks containing b, either).
  • "quit" This command tells the arm to shut down (and thus terminates the simulation).

Note that if the input command sequence accidentally offers a command where a and b are the same value, that command is illegal and should be ignored.

 

As an example, then, if we have 4 blocks in the state [0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 2, 3: 3], and run a "move 2 onto 3", we get [0: 0, 1: 1, 2:, 3: 3 2]. If we then run a "pile 3 over 1", we should end up with [0: 0, 1: 1 3 2, 2:, 3:]. And so on.

 

Input: n = 10. Run these commands:

  1. move 9 onto 1
  2. move 8 over 1
  3. move 7 over 1
  4. move 6 over 1
  5. pile 8 over 6
  6. pile 8 over 5
  7. move 2 over 1
  8. move 4 over 9
  9. quit

The result should be [0: 0, 1: 1 9 2 4, 2:, 3: 3, 4:, 5: 5 8 7 6, 6:, 7:, 8:, 9:]

 

Challenges:

  • Implement the Towers of Hanoi (or as close to it as you can get) using this system.
  • Add an optimizer to the arm, in essence reading in the entire program (up to "quit"), finding shorter paths and/or different commands to achieve the same result.
  • Add a visual component to the simulation, displaying the arm as it moves over each block and moves blocks around.
  • Add another robotic arm, and allow commands to be given simultaneously. This will require some thought—does each arm execute a complete command before allowing the other arm to execute (which reduces the performance having two arms might offer), or can each arm act entirely independently? The two (or more) arms will probably need separate command streams, but you might try running them with one command stream just for grins. Note that deciding how to synchronized the arms so they don't conflict with one another will probably require adding some kind of synchronization instructions into the stream as well.

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Monday, May 10, 2010 12:01:36 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Thursday, May 06, 2010
Code Kata: Compressing Lists

Code Katas are small, relatively simple exercises designed to give you a problem to try and solve. I like to use them as a way to get my feet wet and help write something more interesting than "Hello World" but less complicated than "The Internet's Next Killer App".

 

Rick Minerich mentioned this one on his blog already, but here is the original "problem"/challenge as it was presented to me and which I in turn shot to him over a Twitter DM:

 

I have a list, say something like [4, 4, 4, 4, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 5, 5], which consists of varying repetitions of integers. (We can assume that it's always numbers, and the use of the term "list" here is generic—it could be a list, array, or some other collection class, your choice.) The goal is to take this list of numbers, and "compress" it down into a (theoretically smaller) list of numbers in pairs, where the first of the pair is the occurrence number of the value, which is the second number. So, since the list above has four 4's, followed by three 2's, two 3's, four 2's, three 1's and two 5's, it should compress into [4, 4, 3, 2, 2, 3, 3, 1, 2, 5].

Update: Typo! It should compress into [4, 4, 3, 2, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, 1, 2, 5], not [4, 4, 3, 2, 2, 3, 3, 1, 2, 5]. Sorry!

Using your functional language of choice, implement a solution. (No looking at Rick's solution first, by the way—that's cheating!) Feel free to post proposed solutions here as comments, by the way.

 

This is a pretty easy challenge, but I wanted to try and solve it in a functional mindset, which the challenger had never seen before. I also thought it made for an interesting challenge for people who've never programming in functional languages before, because it requires a very different approach than the imperative solution.

 

Extensions to the kata (a.k.a. "extra credit"):

  • How does the implementation change (if any) to generalize it to a list of any particular type? (Assume the list is of homogenous type—always strings, always ints, always whatever.)
  • How does the implementation change (if any) to generalize it to a list of any type? (In other words, a list of strings, ints, Dates, whatever, mixed together within the list: [1, 1, "one", "one", "one", ...] .)
  • How does the implementation change (if any) to generate a list of two-item tuples (the first being the occurence, the second being the value) as the result instead? Are there significant advantages to this?
  • How does the implementation change (if any) to parallelize/multi-thread it? For your particular language how many elements have to be in the list before doing so yields a significant payoff?

By the way, some of the extension questions make the Kata somewhat interesting even for the imperative/O-O developer; have at, and let me know what you think.


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Thursday, May 06, 2010 2:42:09 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Sunday, February 14, 2010
Don't Fear the dynamic/VARIANT/Reaper....

A couple of days ago, a buddy of mine, Scott Hanselman, wrote a nice little intro to the "dynamic" type in C# 4.0. In particular, I like (though don't necessarily 100% agree with) his one-sentence summation of dynamic as "There's no way for you or I to know the type of this now, compiler, so let's hope that the runtime figures it out." It's an interesting characterization, but my disagreement with his characterization is not the point here, at least not of this particular blog entry.

I've been waiting for it for a while, ever since C# 4 was announced, and sure enough, here we go: Scott's blog is the victim of the Static-Typing Fundamentalist, the bearded and grizzled veteran of the Static/Dynamic Code Wars, come out to proclaim the sins of dynamic programming, the evils of those who use(d) it, and why C#/C++/Java was so much better than Visual Basic/Ruby/Python/whatever. Be careful of these creatures. They rival Al-Qaeda in their ferocity and zeal, Fox News in their attention to detail and evidence, and George Bush in their pronouncements of gloom and doom for the future if we don't act now and eliminate this evil.

Allow me to quote (liberally) from Rob's comment on Scott's blog, and comment in turn as we go:

It's such a shame that you promote this stuff. You should've seen the horrific devastation that "Variant" caused in the old VB days. Variant single-handedly create job security for so many people since the late 90's, because of the horrible, horrible, horrible things that developers did with that ridiculous, 12-byte data type!

I just love it when people make comments like "horrific devastation". Nothing like a little hyperbole to liven things up! I mean, it didn't cause exceptions, it didn't make code hard to read, it didn't make it tricky for developers to modify and refactor safely, it leveled cities! burned forests! slaughtered kittens! and even worse, it was 12 bytes in size!

Never mind the fact that Visual Basic developers frequently churned out apps twice, three, five times faster than their C++ cousins did. (I know this—I was one of those C++ developers, and routinely mocked the VB guys across the hall for their crappy language and code.... until they built an app in a few days that I tried to build at home in C++ and gave up after two weeks. And all the damn thing did was basic dialogs-and-data kinds of stuff, too.)

This weak-typing with late-binding is just such a bad idea. I know you'll say "But wait, these are powerful tools that skilled developers can leverage!" - and maybe so, but 98% of the people that truly use these sorts of techniques out in the real world, are unskilled developers making a mess of software all across this great land, because the compiler is so forgiving.

Ah, the "All Developers (Except Me) Are Idiots" argument. I love this one—the hubris involved here is just too precious for words. I have no doubt that the author of this post, being (of course) the classically-trained object-oriented developer and therefore too smart/disciplined/experienced/whatever to fall into such a ridiculous temptation as to use dynamic typing, would never use this feature except in the Most Dire of Emergencies, but his fellow programmers, all of them being much less disciplined/smart/trained/whatever than he is, will fall for the temptation and write code that levels cities! burns forests! kills kittens! and worse, uses 12 bytes! (Oh, wait, it's only 3 bytes, because dynamic is just a placeholder for an object reference, and all object references are 3 bytes in the CLR. Or at least they used to be—I admit, I haven't checked in CLR 4.) Those poor souls, they won't have any hope! There they'll be, staring at Visual Studio, wanting desperately to do the Right Thing, and that evil little programmer devil on their shoulder (probably wearing a T-shirt that says, "P3rl is l33t" or something equally blasphemous) will whisper, "You know, if you just make it a dynamic, you can get the compiler to shut up and you can go home early...."

Oh, right—sorry, I forgot. That devil will whisper, "You know, if you write this code in Visual Basic .NET, you can make the entire codebase Option Strict Off and Option Explicit Off, make the compiler shut up and you can go home early...." Hell, they've been whispering that bit of subversion since 2001. And ye Gods! The leveled cities! burned forests! cute little kitten bodies! all over the place! It's fortunate that we C# developers have kept all those Visual Basic developers on the straight-and-narrow path of true salvation static typing.

This is a huge step backwards for C#, in my opinion - and creates the same scenario VB always did - where it is so forgiving, that it allows developers to write horrible code and you won't so much as see a compiler warning!! I've always tauted that C# was better, simply because it gave the developer "tough love", and forced him/her to be better coder and to "make good choices"! :-)

Ah, yes, the C# compiler and its "tough love". The "prefer compile errors over runtime errors" argument, vis-a-vis Scott Meyers' "Effective C++" circa 1994 or so. It's vastly preferable to see errors early, before the big demo in front of the VP/President/potential customer. (Anybody who disagrees with this obviously hasn't had a demo fail in front of a VP/President/potential customer.) How fortunate that the C# compiler catches all these ugly errors at compile-time, like

   1: static void DoSomething()
   2: {
   3:     List<object> intList = new List<object>();
   4:     intList.Add(5);
   5:     string s = (string) intList[0];
   6:     Console.WriteLine(s);
   7: }

... because boy, that would be embarrassing if it didn't. I mean, can you imagine the horror other disciplined/smart/experienced developers would feel if a lenient compiler actually allowed code like this:

   1: class Point
   2: {
   3:     internal int x;
   4:     internal int y;
   5:     public Point(int x, int y)
   6:     {
   7:         x = x;
   8:         y = y;
   9:     }
  10: }

or this:

   1: class Point
   2: {
   3:     internal int x;
   4:     internal int y;
   5:     public Point(int x, int y)
   6:     {
   7:         this.x = x;
   8:         this.y = y;
   9:     }
  10:     public override string ToString()
  11:     {
  12:         return String.Format("({0},{1})", x, y);
  13:     }
  14: }
  15: static void DoSomething()
  16: {
  17:     Point pt = new Point(12, 12);
  18:     pt.GetType()
  19:         .GetField("x", BindingFlags.Instance | 
  20:             BindingFlags.NonPublic)
  21:         .SetValue(pt, 24);
  22:     Console.WriteLine(pt);
  23: }

to compile? Cities! Forests! Kittens! Thank God C# isn't that kind of lustfully promiscuous... I mean, "lenient"... compiler!

(Now if only we could tout blog comment engines with spellcheck....)

Specific to this blog post, if you are doing somewhere where you can't even quantify what the data type that is coming back? Guess waht, you've got yourself a bad design.

Wow. There's just no arguing with that one. I mean, knowing the actual type on which the method is being dispatched is such a huge part of the C# development experience:

   1: static void DoSomething()
   2: {
   3:     List<Point> ptList = new List<Point>();
   4:     ptList.Add(new Point(12, 12));
   5:     object o = ptList[0];
   6:     Console.WriteLine(o.ToString());
   7: }

Gah. Just the thought of not knowing the concrete type on which the method is being dispatched gives me the heebie-jeebies.

Just because the framework allows you use weak-typing and late-binding, doesn't mean you should - nor should you endorse it's use, in my opinion.

Somebody better tell all those users of NHibernate, NUnit, Spring.NET, MEF and all those other Reflection-based tools... including WinForms, ASP.NET, WPF, Workflow and WCF, come to think about it... that they're using frameworks that clearly were designed by idiots. (The gall of those people.)

I'm just saying, it's a shame that popular "nerd celebrities" like you (and I mean zero offense by that!) - endorse all this loosey-goosey typing. I say that becuase I've never seen a single case where weak typing or late binding: A) made a design better or B) where it didn't make the component or application worse, because it was a looser design.

I'm so glad you were here to set Scott and me straight, Rob. Because otherwise, we might actually get something done. God forbid.

Little tidbits of thought for those who are still thinking about this one.

  • Ola Bini describes the application of the right language at the right level of the stack as a three-layer pyramid.
  • Any C# or Java developer who's not writing unit tests to test their code "because the compiler will catch all those errors" and provide "tough love" needs to be fired. Immediately. I cannot conceive of a situation where unit tests can be passed over in favor of static typing in a professionally-responsible development project. (Oh, don't mis-read that, I can see lots of situations where unit tests aren't necessary. But not on code that's going to reach Production.)
  • The argument for the degree of static typing in C# or Java is completely indefensible compared to what statically-typed type-inferenced languages like Haskell, F# or Scala provide. And their syntax frequently looks like "let x = [ 1; 2; 3; 4; ]", which isn't all that far off from what a dynamically-typed language looks like, despite very very different things happening under the compiler's hood. Until you, the Statically-Typed Fundamentalist, have written code in a Haskell/ML-derived language, you have no right arguing the merits of static typing. (In fact, that's probably also true if you've never written code in Ruby, Python, or PowerShell, either.)
  • There's lots more arguments the Static-Typing Fundamentalist can throw, by the way. I'm disappointed Rob never mentioned performance, for one—that's a classic line of attack, too. Never mind the fact that most of those guys are still looping down and doing other silly micro-optimizations because that's way C++ taught them to do it....
  • Oh, and never ever show the Static Typing Fundamentalist an XML document and using something like XPath to extract data from it. They inevitably fall into XML Schema and the "if we just write the schema flexibly enough" and.... The last time I did that.... I still visit his gravesite, all these years later, and it still hurts, losing him that way.
  • Java guys argued against dynamic typing for years, too... until they tried Groovy and JRuby and Clojure. Now.... not so much.

Peace out.


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Sunday, February 14, 2010 3:41:34 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Tuesday, January 19, 2010
10 Things To Improve Your Development Career

Cruising the Web late last night, I ran across "10 things you can do to advance your career as a developer", summarized below:

  1. Build a PC
  2. Participate in an online forum and help others
  3. Man the help desk
  4. Perform field service
  5. Perform DBA functions
  6. Perform all phases of the project lifecycle
  7. Recognize and learn the latest technologies
  8. Be an independent contractor
  9. Lead a project, supervise, or manage
  10. Seek additional education

I agreed with some of them, I disagreed with others, and in general felt like they were a little too high-level to be of real use. For example, "Seek additional education" seems entirely too vague: In what? How much? How often? And "Recognize and learn the latest technologies" is something like offering advice to the Olympic fencing silver medalist and saying, "You should have tried harder".

So, in the great spirit of "Not Invented Here", I present my own list; as usual, I welcome comment and argument. And, also as usual, caveats apply, since not everybody will be in precisely the same place and be looking for the same things. In general, though, whether you're looking to kick-start your career or just "kick it up a notch", I believe this list will help, because these ideas have been of help to me at some point or another in my own career.

10: Build a PC.

Yes, even developers have to know about hardware. More importantly, a developer at a small organization or team will find himself in a position where he has to take on some system administrator roles, and sometimes that means grabbing a screwdriver, getting a little dusty and dirty, and swapping hardware around. Having said this, though, once you've done it once or twice, leave it alone—the hardware game is an ever-shifting and ever-changing game (much like software is, surprise surprise), and it's been my experience that most of us only really have the time to pursue one or the other.

By the way, "PC" there is something of a generic term—build a Linux box, build a Windows box, or "build" a Mac OS box (meaning, buy a Mac Pro and trick it out a little—add more memory, add another hard drive, and so on), they all get you comfortable with snapping parts together, and discovering just how ridiculously simple the whole thing really is.

And for the record, once you've done it, go ahead and go back to buying pre-built systems or laptops—I've never found building a PC to be any cheaper than buying one pre-built. Particularly for PC systems, I prefer to use smaller local vendors where I can customize and trick out the box. If you're a Mac, that's not really an option unless you're into the "Hackintosh" thing, which is quite possibly the logical equivalent to "Build a PC". Having never done it myself, though, I can't say how useful that is as an educational action.

9: Pick a destination

Do you want to run a team of your own? Become an independent contractor? Teach programming classes? Speak at conferences? Move up into higher management and get out of the programming game altogether? Everybody's got a different idea of what they consider to be the "ideal" career, but it's amazing how many people don't really think about what they want their career path to be.

A wise man once said, "The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." I disagree: The journey of a thousand miles begins with the damn map. You have to know where you want to go, and a rough idea of how to get there, before you can really start with that single step. Otherwise, you're just wandering, which in itself isn't a bad thing, but isn't going to get you to a destination except by random chance. (Sometimes that's not a bad result, but at least then you're openly admitting that you're leaving your career in the hands of chance. If you're OK with that, skip to the next item. If you're not, read on.)

Lay out explicitly (as in, write it down someplace) what kind of job you're wanting to grow into, and then lay out a couple of scenarios that move you closer towards that goal. Can you grow within the company you're in? (Have others been able to?) Do you need to quit and strike out on your own? Do you want to lead a team of your own? (Are there new projects coming in to the company that you could put yourself forward as a potential tech lead?) And so on.

Once you've identified the destination, now you can start thinking about steps to get there.

If you want to become a speaker, put your name forward to give some presentations at the local technology user group, or volunteer to hold a "brown bag" session at the company. Sign up with Toastmasters to hone your speaking technique. Watch other speakers give technical talks, and see what they do that you don't, and vice versa.

If you want to be a tech lead, start by quietly assisting other members of the team get their work done. Help them debug thorny problems. Answer questions they have. Offer yourself up as a resource for dealing with hard problems.

If you want to slowly move up the management chain, look to get into the project management side of things. Offer to be a point of contact for the users. Learn the business better. Sit down next to one of your users and watch their interaction with the existing software, and try to see the system from their point of view.

And so on.

8: Be a bell curve

Frequently, at conferences, attendees ask me how I got to know so much on so many things. In some ways, I'm reminded of the story of a world-famous concert pianist giving a concert at Carnegie Hall—when a gushing fan said, "I'd give my life to be able to play like that", the pianist responded quietly, "I did". But as much as I'd like to leave you with the impression that I've dedicated my entire life to knowing everything I could about this industry, that would be something of a lie. The truth is, I don't know anywhere near as much as I'd like, and I'm always poking my head into new areas. Thank God for my ADD, that's all I can say on that one.

For the rest of you, though, that's not feasible, and not really practical, particularly since I have an advantage that the "working" programmer doesn't—I have set aside weeks or months in which to do nothing more than study a new technology or language.

Back in the early days of my career, though, when I was holding down the 9-to-5, I was a Windows/C++ programmer. I was working with the Borland C++ compiler and its associated framework, the ObjectWindows Library (OWL), extending and maintaining applications written in it. One contracting client wanted me to work with Microsoft MFC instead of OWL. Another one was storing data into a relational database using ODBC. And so on. Slowly, over time, I built up a "bell curve"-looking collection of skills that sort of "hovered" around the central position of C++/Windows.

Then, one day, a buddy of mine mentioned the team on which he was a project manager was looking for new blood. They were doing web applications, something with which I had zero experience—this was completely outside of my bell curve. HTML, HTTP, Cold Fusion, NetDynamics (an early Java app server), this was way out of my range, though at least NetDynamics was a little similar, since it was basically a server-side application framework, and I had some experience with app frameworks from my C++ days. So, resting on my C++ experience, I started flirting with Java, and so on.

Before long, my "bell curve" had been readjusted to have Java more or less at its center, and I found that experience in C++ still worked out here—what I knew about ODBC turned out to be incredibly useful in understanding JDBC, what I knew about DLLs from Windows turned out to be helpful in understanding Java's dynamic loading model, and of course syntactically Java looked a lot like C++ even though it behaved a little bit differently under the hood. (One article author suggested that Java was closer to Smalltalk than C++, and that prompted me to briefly flirt with Smalltalk before I concluded said author was out of his frakking mind.)

All of this happened over roughly a three-year period, by the way.

The point here is that you won't be able to assimilate the entire industry in a single sitting, so pick something that's relatively close to what you already know, and use your experience as a springboard to learn something that's new, yet possibly-if-not-probably useful to your current job. You don't have to be a deep expert in it, and the further away it is from what you do, the less you really need to know about it (hence the bell curve metaphor), but you're still exposing yourself to new ideas and new concepts and new tools/technologies that still could be applicable to what you do on a daily basis. Over time the "center" of your bell curve may drift away from what you've done to include new things, and that's OK.

7: Learn one new thing every year

In the last tip, I told you to branch out slowly from what you know. In this tip, I'm telling you to go throw a dart at something entirely unfamiliar to you and learn it. Yes, I realize this sounds contradictory. It's because those who stick to only what they know end up missing the radical shifts of direction that the industry hits every half-decade or so until it's mainstream and commonplace and "everybody's doing it".

In their amazing book "The Pragmatic Programmer", Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt suggest that you learn one new programming language every year. I'm going to amend that somewhat—not because there aren't enough languages in the world to keep you on that pace for the rest of your life—far from it, if that's what you want, go learn Ruby, F#, Scala, Groovy, Clojure, Icon, Io, Erlang, Haskell and Smalltalk, then come back to me for the list for 2020—but because languages aren't the only thing that we as developers need to explore. There's a lot of movement going on in areas beyond languages, and you don't want to be the last kid on the block to know they're happening.

Consider this list: object databases (db4o) and/or the "NoSQL" movement (MongoDB). Dependency injection and composable architectures (Spring, MEF). A dynamic language (Ruby, Python, ECMAScript). A functional language (F#, Scala, Haskell). A Lisp (Common Lisp, Clojure, Scheme, Nu). A mobile platform (iPhone, Android). "Space"-based architecture (Gigaspaces, Terracotta). Rich UI platforms (Flash/Flex, Silverlight). Browser enhancements (AJAX, jQuery, HTML 5) and how they're different from the rich UI platforms. And this is without adding any of the "obvious" stuff, like Cloud, to the list.

(I'm not convinced Cloud is something worth learning this year, anyway.)

You get through that list, you're operating outside of your comfort zone, and chances are, your boss' comfort zone, which puts you into the enviable position of being somebody who can advise him around those technologies. DO NOT TAKE THIS TO MEAN YOU MUST KNOW THEM DEEPLY. Just having a passing familiarity with them can be enough. DO NOT TAKE THIS TO MEAN YOU SHOULD PROPOSE USING THEM ON THE NEXT PROJECT. In fact, sometimes the most compelling evidence that you really know where and when they should be used is when you suggest stealing ideas from the thing, rather than trying to force-fit the thing onto the project as a whole.

6: Practice, practice, practice

Speaking of the concert pianist, somebody once asked him how to get to Carnegie Hall. HIs answer: "Practice, my boy, practice."

The same is true here. You're not going to get to be a better developer without practice. Volunteer some time—even if it's just an hour a week—on an open-source project, or start one of your own. Heck, it doesn't even have to be an "open source" project—just create some requirements of your own, solve a problem that a family member is having, or rewrite the project you're on as an interesting side-project. Do the Nike thing and "Just do it". Write some Scala code. Write some F# code. Once you're past "hello world", write the Scala code to use db4o as a persistent storage. Wire it up behind Tapestry. Or write straight servlets in Scala. And so on.

5: Turn off the TV

Speaking of marketing slogans, if you're like most Americans, surveys have shown that you watch about four hours of TV a day, or 28 hours of TV a week. In that same amount of time (28 hours over 1 week), you could read the entire set of poems by Maya Angelou, one F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, all poems by T.S.Eliot, 2 plays by Thornton Wilder, or all 150 Psalms of the Bible. An average reader, reading just one hour a day, can finish an "average-sized" book (let's assume about the size of a novel) in a week, which translates to 52 books a year.

Let's assume a technical book is going to take slightly longer, since it's a bit deeper in concept and requires you to spend some time experimenting and typing in code; let's assume that reading and going through the exercises of an average technical book will require 4 weeks (a month) instead of just one week. That's 12 new tools/languages/frameworks/ideas you'd be learning per year.

All because you stopped watching David Caruso turn to the camera, whip his sunglasses off and say something stupid. (I guess it's not his fault; CSI:Miami is a crap show. The other two are actually not bad, but Miami just makes me retch.)

After all, when's the last time that David Caruso or the rest of that show did anything that was even remotely realistic from a computer perspective? (I always laugh out loud every time they run a database search against some national database on a completely non-indexable criteria—like a partial license plate number—and it comes back in seconds. What the hell database are THEY using? I want it!) Soon as you hear The Who break into that riff, flip off the TV (or set it to mute) and pick up the book on the nightstand and boost your career. (And hopefully sink Caruso's.)

Or, if you just can't give up your weekly dose of Caruso, then put the book in the bathroom. Think about it—how much time do you spend in there a week?

And this gets even better when you get a Kindle or other e-reader that accepts PDFs, or the book you're interested in is natively supported in the e-readers' format. Now you have it with you for lunch, waiting at dinner for your food to arrive, or while you're sitting guard on your 10-year-old so he doesn't sneak out of his room after his bedtime to play more XBox.

4: Have a life

Speaking of XBox, don't slave your life to work. Pursue other things. Scientists have repeatedly discovered that exercise helps keep the mind in shape, so take a couple of hours a week (buh-bye, American Idol) and go get some exercise. Pick up a new sport you've never played before, or just go work out at the gym. (This year I'm doing Hopkido and fencing.) Read some nontechnical books. (I recommend anything by Malcolm Gladwell as a starting point.) Spend time with your family, if you have one—mine spends at least six or seven hours a week playing "family games" like Settlers of Catan, Dominion, To Court The King, Munchkin, and other non-traditional games, usually over lunch or dinner. I also belong to an informal "Game Night club" in Redmond consisting of several Microsoft employees and their families, as well as outsiders. And so on. Heck, go to a local bar and watch the game, and you'll meet some really interesting people. And some boring people, too, but you don't have to talk to them during the next game if you don't want.

This isn't just about maintaining a healthy work-life balance—it's also about having interests that other people can latch on to, qualities that will make you more "human" and more interesting as a person, and make you more attractive and "connectable" and stand out better in their mind when they hear that somebody they know is looking for a software developer. This will also help you connect better with your users, because like it or not, they do not get your puns involving Klingon. (Besides, the geek stereotype is SO 90's, and it's time we let the world know that.)

Besides, you never know when having some depth in other areas—philosophy, music, art, physics, sports, whatever—will help you create an analogy that will explain some thorny computer science concept to a non-technical person and get past a communication roadblock.

3: Practice on a cadaver

Long before they scrub up for their first surgery on a human, medical students practice on dead bodies. It's grisly, it's not something we really want to think about, but when you're the one going under the general anesthesia, would you rather see the surgeon flipping through the "How-To" manual, "just to refresh himself"?

Diagnosing and debugging a software system can be a hugely puzzling trial, largely because there are so many possible "moving parts" that are creating the problem. Compound that with certain bugs that only appear when multiple users are interacting at the same time, and you've got a recipe for disaster when a production bug suddenly threatens to jeopardize the company's online revenue stream. Do you really want to be sitting in the production center, flipping through "How-To"'s and FAQs online while your boss looks on and your CEO is counting every minute by the thousands of dollars?

Take a tip from the med student: long before the thing goes into production, introduce a bug, deploy the code into a virtual machine, then hand it over to a buddy and let him try to track it down. Have him do the same for you. Or if you can't find a buddy to help you, do it to yourself (but try not to cheat or let your knowledge of where the bug is color your reactions). How do you know the bug is there? Once you know it's there, how do you determine what kind of bug it is? Where do you start looking for it? How would you track it down without attaching a debugger or otherwise disrupting the system's operations? (Remember, we can't always just attach an IDE and step through the code on a production server.) How do you patch the running system? And so on.

Remember, you can either learn these things under controlled circumstances, learn them while you're in the "hot seat", so to speak, or not learn them at all and see how long the company keeps you around.

2: Administer the system

Take off your developer hat for a while—a week, a month, a quarter, whatever—and be one of those thankless folks who have to keep the system running. Wear the pager that goes off at 3AM when a server goes down. Stay all night doing one of those "server upgrades" that have to be done in the middle of the night because the system can't be upgraded while users are using it. Answer the phones or chat requests of those hapless users who can't figure out why they can't find the record they just entered into the system, and after a half-hour of thinking it must be a bug, ask them if they remembered to check the "Save this record" checkbox on the UI (which had to be there because the developers were told it had to be there) before submitting the form. Try adding a user. Try removing a user. Try changing the user's password. Learn what a real joy having seven different properties/XML/configuration files scattered all over the system really is.

Once you've done that, particularly on a system that you built and tossed over the fence into production and thought that was the end of it, you'll understand just why it's so important to keep the system administrators in mind when you're building a system for production. And why it's critical to be able to have a system that tells you when it's down, instead of having to go hunting up the answer when a VP tells you it is (usually because he's just gotten an outage message from a customer or client).

1: Cultivate a peer group

Yes, you can join an online forum, ask questions, answer questions, and learn that way, but that's a poor substitute for physical human contact once in a while. Like it or not, various sociological and psychological studies confirm that a "connection" is really still best made when eyeballs meet flesh. (The "disassociative" nature of email is what makes it so easy to be rude or flamboyant or downright violent in email when we would never say such things in person.) Go to conferences, join a user group, even start one of your own if you can't find one. Yes, the online avenues are still open to you—read blogs, join mailing lists or newsgroups—but don't lose sight of human-to-human contact.

While we're at it, don't create a peer group of people that all look to you for answers—as flattering as that feels, and as much as we do learn by providing answers, frequently we rise (or fall) to the level of our peers—have at least one peer group that's overwhelmingly smarter than you, and as scary as it might be, venture to offer an answer or two to that group when a question comes up. You don't have to be right—in fact, it's often vastly more educational to be wrong. Just maintain an attitude that says "I have no ego wrapped up in being right or wrong", and take the entire experience as a learning opportunity.


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Tuesday, January 19, 2010 2:02:01 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Thursday, January 14, 2010
2010 TechEd PreCon: Multiparadigmatic C#

I'm excited to say that TechEd has accepted my pre-conference proposal, Multiparadigmatic C#, where the abstract reads:

C# has grown from “just” an object-oriented language into a language that is capable of expressing several different paradigms of software development: object-oriented, functional, and dynamic. In this session, developers will learn how to approach programming in C# to use each of these approaches, and when.

If you're interested in seeing C# used in a variety of different ways, come on out.

And if you're not going to TechEd.... why not? It's in New Orleans, folks!


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Thursday, January 14, 2010 11:49:53 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Thursday, January 07, 2010
Interested in F#?

But too impatient to read a whole book on it? Try the 6-panel RefCard that Chance Coble and I put together for DZone. Free download.

Or, for the more patient type, wait for the books that Chance and I (Professional F#) are each writing; they're remarkably complementary, at least from what Chance has told me about his.

Which reminds me.... if you've not already noticed, Pro F# is now up in Amazon. Call me a romantic fool, but I get just a little thrill run down my spine every time a new book of mine shows up on Amazon, and just a slightly bigger one when it shows up on a shelf (which will happen shortly after VS 2010 hits the streets). Nothing like that little surge of energy to give you the boost you need to cross the finish line. :-)


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Thursday, January 07, 2010 3:28:13 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Tuesday, January 05, 2010
2010 Predictions, 2009 Predictions Revisited

Here we go again—another year, another set of predictions revisited and offered up for the next 12 months. And maybe, if I'm feeling really ambitious, I'll take that shot I thought about last year and try predicting for the decade. Without further ado, I'll go back and revisit, unedited, my predictions for 2009 ("THEN"), and pontificate on those subjects for 2010 before adding any new material/topics. Just for convenience, here's a link back to last years' predictions.

Last year's predictions went something like this (complete with basketball-scoring):

  • THEN: "Cloud" will become the next "ESB" or "SOA", in that it will be something that everybody will talk about, but few will understand and even fewer will do anything with. (Considering the widespread disparity in the definition of the term, this seems like a no-brainer.) NOW: Oh, yeah. Straight up. I get two points for this one. Does anyone have a working definition of "cloud" that applies to all of the major vendors' implementations? Ted, 2; Wrongness, 0.
  • THEN: Interest in Scala will continue to rise, as will the number of detractors who point out that Scala is too hard to learn. NOW: Two points for this one, too. Not a hard one, mind you, but one of those "pass-and-shoot" jumpers from twelve feet out. James Strachan even tweeted about this earlier today, pointing out this comparison. As more Java developers who think of themselves as smart people try to pick up Scala and fail, the numbers of sour grapes responses like "Scala's too complex, and who needs that functional stuff anyway?" will continue to rise in 2010. Ted, 4; Wrongness, 0.
  • THEN: Interest in F# will continue to rise, as will the number of detractors who point out that F# is too hard to learn. (Hey, the two really are cousins, and the fortunes of one will serve as a pretty good indication of the fortunes of the other, and both really seem to be on the same arc right now.) NOW: Interestingly enough, I haven't heard as many F# detractors as Scala detractors, possibly because I think F# hasn't really reached the masses of .NET developers the way that Scala has managed to find its way in front of Java developers. I think that'll change mighty quickly in 2010, though, once VS 2010 hits the streets. Ted, 4; Wrongness 2.
  • THEN: Interest in all kinds of functional languages will continue to rise, and more than one person will take a hint from Bob "crazybob" Lee and liken functional programming to AOP, for good and for ill. People who took classes on Haskell in college will find themselves reaching for their old college textbooks again. NOW: Yep, I'm claiming two points on this one, if only because a bunch of Haskell books shipped this year, and they'll be the last to do so for about five years after this. (By the way, does anybody still remember aspects?) But I'm going the opposite way with this one now; yes, there's Haskell, and yes, there's Erlang, and yes, there's a lot of other functional languages out there, but who cares? They're hard to learn, they don't always translate well to other languages, and developers want languages that work on the platform they use on a daily basis, and that means F# and Scala or Clojure, or its simply not an option. Ted 6; Wrongness 2.
  • THEN: The iPhone is going to be hailed as "the enterprise development platform of the future", and companies will be rolling out apps to it. Look for Quicken iPhone edition, PowerPoint and/or Keynote iPhone edition, along with connectors to hook the iPhone up to a presentation device, and (I'll bet) a World of Warcraft iPhone client (legit or otherwise). iPhone is the new hotness in the mobile space, and people will flock to it madly. NOW: Two more points, but let's be honest—this was a fast-break layup, no work required on my part. Ted 8; Wrongness 2.
  • THEN: Another Oslo CTP will come out, and it will bear only a superficial resemblance to the one that came out in October at PDC. Betting on Oslo right now is a fools' bet, not because of any inherent weakness in the technology, but just because it's way too early in the cycle to be thinking about for anything vaguely resembling production code. NOW: If you've worked at all with Oslo, you might argue with me, but I'm still taking my two points. The two CTPs were pretty different in a number of ways. Ted 10; Wrongness 2.
  • THEN: The IronPython and IronRuby teams will find some serious versioning issues as they try to manage the DLR versioning story between themselves and the CLR as a whole. An initial hack will result, which will be codified into a standard practice when .NET 4.0 ships. Then the next release of IPy or IRb will have to try and slip around its restrictions in 2010/2011. By 2012, IPy and IRb will have to be shipping as part of Visual Studio just to put the releases back into lockstep with one another (and the rest of the .NET universe). NOW: Pressure is still building. Let's see what happens by the time VS 2010 ships, and then see what the IPy/IRb teams start to do to adjust to the versioning issues that arise. Ted 8; Wrongness 2.
  • THEN: The death of JSR-277 will spark an uprising among the two leading groups hoping to foist it off on the Java community--OSGi and Maven--while the rest of the Java world will breathe a huge sigh of relief and look to see what "modularity" means in Java 7. Some of the alpha geeks in Java will start using--if not building--JDK 7 builds just to get a heads-up on its impact, and be quietly surprised and, I dare say, perhaps even pleased. NOW: Ah, Ted, you really should never underestimate the community's willingness to take a bad idea, strip all the goodness out of it, and then cycle it back into the mix as something completely different yet somehow just as dangerous and crazy. I give you Project Jigsaw. Ted 10; Wrongness 2;
  • THEN: The invokedynamic JSR will leapfrog in importance to the top of the list. NOW: The invokedynamic JSR begat interest in other languages on the JVM. The interest in other languages on the JVM begat the need to start thinking about how to support them in the Java libraries. The need to start thinking about supporting those languages begat a "Holy sh*t moment" somewhere inside Sun and led them to (re-)propose closures for JDK 7. And in local sports news, Ted notched up two more points on the scoreboard. Ted 12; Wrongness 2.
  • THEN: Another Windows 7 CTP will come out, and it will spawn huge media interest that will eventually be remembered as Microsoft promises, that will eventually be remembered as Microsoft guarantees, that will eventually be remembered as Microsoft FUD and "promising much, delivering little". Microsoft ain't always at fault for the inflated expectations people have--sometimes, yes, perhaps even a lot of times, but not always. NOW: And then, just when the game started to turn into a runaway, airballs started to fly. The Windows7 release shipped, and contrary to what I expected, the general response to it was pretty warm. Yes, there were a few issues that emerged, but overall the media liked it, the masses liked it, and Microsoft seemed to have dodged a bullet. Ted 12; Wrongness 5.
  • THEN: Apple will begin to legally threaten the clone market again, except this time somebody's going to get the DOJ involved. (Yes, this is the iPhone/iTunes prediction from last year, carrying over. I still expect this to happen.) NOW: What clones? The only people trying to clone Macs are those who are building Hackintosh machines, and Apple can't sue them so long as they're using licensed copies of Mac OS X (as far as I know). Which has never stopped them from trying, mind you, and I still think Steve has some part of his brain whispering to him at night, calculating all the hardware sales lost to Hackintosh netbooks out there. But in any event, that's another shot missed. Ted 12; Wrongness 7.
  • THEN: Alpha-geek developers will start creating their own languages (even if they're obscure or bizarre ones like Shakespeare or Ook#) just to have that listed on their resume as the DSL/custom language buzz continues to build. NOW: I give you Ioke. If I'd extended this to include outdated CPU interpreters, I'd have made that three-pointer from half-court instead of just the top of the key. Ted 14; Wrongness 7.
  • THEN: Roy Fielding will officially disown most of the "REST"ful authors and software packages available. Nobody will care--or worse, somebody looking to make a name for themselves will proclaim that Roy "doesn't really understand REST". And they'll be right--Roy doesn't understand what they consider to be REST, and the fact that he created the term will be of no importance anymore. Being "REST"ful will equate to "I did it myself!", complete with expectations of a gold star and a lollipop. NOW: Does anybody in the REST community care what Roy Fielding wrote way back when? I keep seeing "REST"ful systems that seem to have designers who've never heard of Roy, or his thesis. Roy hasn't officially disowned them, but damn if he doesn't seem close to it. Still.... No points. Ted 14; Wrongness 9.
  • THEN: The Parrot guys will make at least one more minor point release. Nobody will notice or care, except for a few doggedly stubborn Perl hackers. They will find themselves having nightmares of previous lives carrying around OS/2 books and Amiga paraphernalia. Perl 6 will celebrate it's seventh... or is it eighth?... anniversary of being announced, and nobody will notice. NOW: Does anybody still follow Perl 6 development? Has the spec even been written yet? Google on "Perl 6 release", and you get varying reports: "It'll ship 'when it's ready'", "There are no such dates because this isn't a commericially-backed effort", and "Spring 2010". Swish—nothin' but net. Ted 16; Wrongness 9.
  • THEN: The debate around "Scrum Certification" will rise to a fever pitch as short-sighted money-tight companies start looking for reasons to cut costs and either buy into agile at a superficial level and watch it fail, or start looking to cut the agilists from their company in order to replace them with cheaper labor. NOW: Agile has become another adjective meaning "best practices", and as such, has essentially lost its meaning. Just ask Scott Bellware. Ted 18; Wrongness 9.
  • THEN: Adobe will continue to make Flex and AIR look more like C# and the CLR even as Microsoft tries to make Silverlight look more like Flash and AIR. Web designers will now get to experience the same fun that back-end web developers have enjoyed for near-on a decade, as shops begin to artificially partition themselves up as either "Flash" shops or "Silverlight" shops. NOW: Not sure how to score this one—I haven't seen the explicit partitioning happen yet, but the two environments definitely still seem to be looking to start tromping on each others' turf, particularly when we look at the rapid releases coming from the Silverlight team. Ted 16; Wrongness 11.
  • THEN: Gartner will still come knocking, looking to hire me for outrageous sums of money to do nothing but blog and wax prophetic. NOW: Still no job offers. Damn. Ah, well. Ted 16; Wrongness 13.

A close game. Could've gone either way. *shrug* Ah, well. It was silly to try and score it in basketball metaphor, anyway—that's the last time I watch ESPN before writing this.

For 2010, I predict....

  • ... I will offer 3- and 4-day training classes on F# and Scala, among other things. OK, that's not fair—yes, I have the materials, I just need to work out locations and times. Contact me if you're interested in a private class, by the way.
  • ... I will publish two books, one on F# and one on Scala. OK, OK, another plug. Or, rather, more of a resolution. One will be the "Professional F#" I'm doing for Wiley/Wrox, the other isn't yet finalized. But it'll either be published through a publisher, or self-published, by JavaOne 2010.
  • ... DSLs will either "succeed" this year, or begin the short slide into the dustbin of obscure programming ideas. Domain-specific language advocates have to put up some kind of strawman for developers to learn from and poke at, or the whole concept will just fade away. Martin's book will help, if it ships this year, but even that might not be enough to generate interest if it doesn't have some kind of large-scale applicability in it. Patterns and refactoring and enterprise containers all had a huge advantage in that developers could see pretty easily what the problem was they solved; DSLs haven't made that clear yet.
  • ... functional languages will start to see a backlash. I hate to say it, but "getting" the functional mindset is hard, and there's precious few resources that are making it easy for mainstream (read: O-O) developers make that adjustment, far fewer than there was during the procedural-to-object shift. If the functional community doesn't want to become mainstream, then mainstream developers will find ways to take functional's most compelling gateway use-case (parallel/concurrent programming) and find a way to "git 'er done" in the traditional O-O approach, probably through software transactional memory, and functional languages like Haskell and Erlang will be relegated to the "What Might Have Been" of computer science history. Not sure what I mean? Try this: walk into a functional language forum, and ask what a monad is. Nobody yet has been able to produce an answer that doesn't involve math theory, or that does involve a practical domain-object-based example. In fact, nobody has really said why (or if) monads are even still useful. Or catamorphisms. Or any of the other dime-store words that the functional community likes to toss around.
  • ... Visual Studio 2010 will ship on time, and be one of the buggiest and/or slowest releases in its history. I hate to make this prediction, because I really don't want to be right, but there's just so much happening in the Visual Studio refactoring effort that it makes me incredibly nervous. Widespread adoption of VS2010 will wait until SP1 at the earliest. In fact....
  • ... Visual Studio 2010 SP 1 will ship within three months of the final product. Microsoft knows that people wait until SP 1 to think about upgrading, so they'll just plan for an eager SP 1 release, and hope that managers will be too hung over from the New Year (still) to notice that the necessary shakeout time hasn't happened.
  • ... Apple will ship a tablet with multi-touch on it, and it will flop horribly. Not sure why I think this, but I just don't think the multi-touch paradigm that Apple has cooked up for the iPhone will carry over to a tablet/laptop device. That won't stop them from shipping it, and it won't stop Apple fan-boiz from buying it, but that's about where the interest will end.
  • ... JDK 7 closures will be debated for a few weeks, then become a fait accompli as the Java community shrugs its collective shoulders. Frankly, I think the Java community has exhausted its interest in debating new language features for Java. Recent college grads and open-source groups with an axe to grind will continue to try and make an issue out of this, but I think the overall Java community just... doesn't... care. They just want to see JDK 7 ship someday.
  • ... Scala either "pops" in 2010, or begins to fall apart. By "pops", I mean reaches a critical mass of developers interested in using it, enough to convince somebody to create a company around it, a la G2One.
  • ... Oracle is going to make a serious "cloud" play, probably by offering an Oracle-hosted version of Azure or AppEngine. Oracle loves the enterprise space too much, and derives too much money from it, to not at least appear to have some kind of offering here. Now that they own Java, they'll marry it up against OpenSolaris, the Oracle database, and throw the whole thing into a series of server centers all over the continent, and call it "Oracle 12c" (c for Cloud, of course) or something.
  • ... Spring development will slow to a crawl and start to take a left turn toward cloud ideas. VMWare bought SpringSource for a reason, and I believe it's entirely centered around VMWare's movement into the cloud space—they want to be more than "just" a virtualization tool. Spring + Groovy makes a compelling development stack, particularly if VMWare does some interesting hooks-n-hacks to make Spring a virtualization environment in its own right somehow. But from a practical perspective, any community-driven development against Spring is all but basically dead. The source may be downloadable later, like the VMWare Player code is, but making contributions back? Fuhgeddabowdit.
  • ... the explosion of e-book readers brings the Kindle 2009 edition way down to size. The era of the e-book reader is here, and honestly, while I'm glad I have a Kindle, I'm expecting that I'll be dusting it off a shelf in a few years. Kinda like I do with my iPods from a few years ago.
  • ... "social networking" becomes the "Web 2.0" of 2010. In other words, using the term will basically identify you as a tech wannabe and clearly out of touch with the bleeding edge.
  • ... Facebook becomes a developer platform requirement. I don't pretend to know anything about Facebook—I'm not even on it, which amazes my family to no end—but clearly Facebook is one of those mechanisms by which people reach each other, and before long, it'll start showing up as a developer requirement for companies looking to hire. If you're looking to build out your resume to make yourself attractive to companies in 2010, mad Facebook skillz might not be a bad investment.
  • ... Nintendo releases an open SDK for building games for its next-gen DS-based device. With the spectacular success of games on the iPhone, Nintendo clearly must see that they're missing a huge opportunity every day developers can't write games for the Nintendo DS that are easily downloadable to the device for playing. Nintendo is not stupid—if they don't open up the SDK and promote "casual" games like those on the iPhone and those that can now be downloaded to the Zune or the XBox, they risk being marginalized out of existence.

And for the next decade, I predict....

  • ... colleges and unversities will begin issuing e-book reader devices to students. It's a helluvalot cheaper than issuing laptops or netbooks, and besides....
  • ... netbooks and e-book readers will merge before the decade is out. Let's be honest—if the e-book reader could do email and browse the web, you have almost the perfect paperback-sized mobile device. As for the credit-card sized mobile device....
  • ... mobile phones will all but disappear as they turn into what PDAs tried to be. "The iPhone makes calls? Really? You mean Voice-over-IP, right? No, wait, over cell signal? It can do that? Wow, there's really an app for everything, isn't there?"
  • ... wireless formats will skyrocket in importance all around the office and home. Combine the iPhone's Bluetooth (or something similar yet lower-power-consuming) with an equally-capable (Bluetooth or otherwise) projector, and suddenly many executives can leave their netbook or laptop at home for a business presentation. Throw in the Whispersync-aware e-book reader/netbook-thing, and now most executives have absolutely zero reason to carry anything but their e-book/netbook and their phone/PDA. The day somebody figures out an easy way to combine Bluetooth with PayPal on the iPhone or Android phone, we will have more or less made pocket change irrelevant. And believe me, that day will happen before the end of the decade.
  • ... either Android or Windows Mobile will gain some serious market share against the iPhone the day they figure out how to support an open and unrestricted AppStore-like app acquisition model. Let's be honest, the attraction of iTunes and AppStore is that I can see an "Oh, cool!" app on a buddy's iPhone, and have it on mine less than 30 seconds later. If Android or WinMo can figure out how to offer that same kind of experience without the draconian AppStore policies to go with it, they'll start making up lost ground on iPhone in a hurry.
  • ... Apple becomes the DOJ target of the decade. Microsoft was it in the 2000's, and Apple's stunning rising success is going to put it squarely in the sights of monopolist accusations before long. Coupled with the unfortunate health distractions that Steve Jobs has to deal with, Apple's going to get hammered pretty hard by the end of the decade, but it will have mastered enough market share and mindshare to weather it as Microsoft has.
  • ... Google becomes the next Microsoft. It won't be anything the founders do, but Google will do "something evil", and it will be loudly and screechingly pointed out by all of Google's corporate opponents, and the star will have fallen.
  • ... Microsoft finds its way again. Microsoft, as a company, has lost its way. This is a company that's not used to losing, and like Bill Belichick's Patriots, they will find ways to adapt and adjust to the changed circumstances of their position to find a way to win again. What that'll be, I have no idea, but historically, the last decade notwithstanding, betting against Microsoft has historically been a bad idea. My gut tells me they'll figure something new to get that mojo back.
  • ... a politician will make himself or herself famous by standing up to the TSA. The scene will play out like this: during a Congressional hearing on airline security, after some nut/terrorist tries to blow up another plane through nitroglycerine-soaked underwear, the TSA director will suggest all passengers should fly naked in order to preserve safety, the congressman/woman will stare open-mouthed at this suggestion, proclaim, "Have you no sense of decency, sir?" and immediately get a standing ovation and never have to worry about re-election again. Folks, if we want to prevent any chance of loss of life from a terrorist act on an airplane, we have to prevent passengers from getting on them. Otherwise, just accept that it might happen, do a reasonable job of preventing it from happening, and let private insurance start offering flight insurance against the possibility to reassure the paranoid.

See you all next year.


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Tuesday, January 05, 2010 1:45:59 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Comments [5]  | 
 Tuesday, December 08, 2009
A New Kind of Service

Why study new and different programming languages? To change your programming mindset. Not sure what I mean by that? Check this out.

Ever done one of these?

   1: public interface IService
   2: {
   3:   DateTime GetDate();
   4:   int CalculateSomethingInteresting(int lhs, int rhs);
   5: }
   6:  
   7: public class OneServiceImpl : IService
   8: {
   9:   public DateTime GetDate()
  10:   { return DateTime.Now; }
  11:   public int CalculateSomethingInteresting(int lhs, int rhs)
  12:   { return lhs + rhs; }
  13: }
  14:  
  15: public class AnotherServiceImpl : IService
  16: {
  17:   public DateTime GetDate()
  18:   { return new DateTime(); }
  19:   public int CalculateSomethingInteresting(int lhs, int rhs)
  20:   { return lhs * rhs; }
  21: }
  22:  
  23: public class ServiceFactory
  24: {
  25:   public static IService GetInstance(string which)
  26:   {
  27:     if (which == "One") return new OneServiceImpl();
  28:     else if (which == "Another") return new AnotherServiceImpl();
  29:     else throw new ArgumentException();
  30:   }
  31: }
  32:  
  33: public class App
  34: {
  35:   public static void Main(string[] args)
  36:   {
  37:     foreach (string s in args)
  38:     {
  39:       IService serv = ServiceFactory.GetInstance(s);
  40:       Console.WriteLine("serv calc = {0}", serv.CalculateSomethingInteresting(3, 3));
  41:     }
  42:   }
  43: }

So has my client this week. In fact, it's fair to say that they're infatuated with them—they've got services all over the place, including at their communication layer, where they use configuration files to decide which of the two service implementations to use, either a "native" .NET implementation or the "real" Web services implementation that they're supposed to be using. (They end up going back to the native implementation because sometimes—which is to say, apparently a lot of times—the Web services implementation is broken in some fundamental way. Go figure.)

The problem is, very bluntly, that the interfaces they're defining (the IService definition above) are ever-so-slightly different from the communications-based proxy interfaces that they use to communicate outside of this process, so some poor schmuck ends up having to write the service implementation (OneServiceImpl) that simply takes the parameters passed in, translates them into a call through the communications-based interface, then takes the response and hands it back. Tedious, mind-numbing coding, particularly painful when there are dozens of interfaces with (in some cases) hundreds of methods per interface. Ouch.

There had to be a better way.

Based on some of the work/research/play I've been doing with both dynamic and functional programming languages, it occurred to me that what they really wanted was some kind of "forwarding" or "delegating" behavior that certain languages have baked in as a feature. In those languages, it's possible to nominate a "delegate" object to which method calls are automatically forwarded if no such method is implemented on this object; in this particular case, what I'd do to replace all of the above is simply create an IService object instance that has either a OneServiceImpl or a AnotherServiceImpl instance (depending on the value in the configuration file) set up as the "delegate" object. That way the method calls remain statically type-checked, but none of this service interface/service implementation/service factory nonsense has to be created just to switch between the two.

(By the way, all of this pain goes away completely in a language that supports deferred checking of signatures until runtime. In other words, if the client had been programming in IronPython or IronRuby or even Visual Basic, we could get away with not having to do any of the above, and just use Reflection to access the appropriate method on whichever of the two service implementations they want to use at the time. Fan would let us do it if we used "->" instead of "." to invoke the method; Cobra would switch between the two automatically; and so on.)

Now, this is C# 2.0 that they're using, and they're pretty entrenched on that point, so I can't simply suggest that they use a new language, but if we take the basic idea and adapt it to C#, we can get pretty much the same behavior without having to force the poor schmuck on the bottom of the totem pole to write all those service implementations by hand.

We start by transforming the IService interface into an IService "interface" (meaning it's not really an interface anymore, but it'll sure look like one to anybody who's not paying attention):

   1: public class IService
   2: {
   3:   public Func0<DateTime> GetDate;
   4:   public Func2<int, int, int> CalculateSomethingInteresting;
   5: }

IService is now a class with fields (not properties, though I suppose if you really wanted them to be properties you could make them such, not that I see much value to doing so), where each field corresponds in name to the method of the interface it wants to replace, and the type is a delegate type parameterized to match the return type and parameter types of that same method of the original interface. Func0 and Func2 are delegate types I had to create, since nothing like them existed until C# 3.0; their definitions are pretty simple:

   1: public delegate R Func0<R>();
   2: public delegate R Func1<R, P1>(P1 p1);
   3: public delegate R Func2<R, P1, P2>(P1 p1, P2 p2);

Now, assuming we have the implementation classes from before, we have two choices; one is to write a by-hand factory that fills out the fields to point to the appropriate method on the implementation class, like so:

   1: if (which == "One")
   2: {
   3:   servInstance.GetDate = delegate() { return DateTime.Now; };
   4:   servInstance.CalculateSomethingInteresting = delegate (int lhs, int rhs) { return lhs + rhs; };
   5: }
   6: else if (which == "Another")
   7: {
   8:   servInstance.GetDate = delegate() { return new DateTime(); };
   9:   servInstance.CalculateSomethingInteresting = delegate (int lhs, int rhs) { return lhs * rhs; };
  10: }
  11: else
  12:   throw new ArgumentException();

But, quite frankly, this defeats the point—the point was to avoid writing all this stuff by hand, not simply repeat it in a different form. So instead, we leverage Reflection, which depends on the basic assumption that the field name in the IService "interface" matches the method name on the implementation class we wish to invoke. Assuming that holds (which it does, in my client's case, anyway), we can reflect on the IService field, find the matching method name in the implementation, then construct a delegate instance around that method and assign the delegate instance to the field. Once complete, we hand back the completed service instance, and the client literally doesn't know that anything's different:

   1: public class ServiceFactory
   2: {
   3:   public static IService GetInstance(string which)
   4:   {
   5:     IService servInstance = new IService();
   6:  
   7:     Type targetType = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetType(which + "ServiceImpl");
   8:  
   9:     foreach (FieldInfo fi in servInstance.GetType().GetFields())
  10:     {
  11:       MethodInfo targetMethod = targetType.GetMethod(fi.Name);
  12:       //Console.WriteLine("Wiring up {0} against {1} with {2}", fi.Name, targetType, targetMethod);
  13:       Delegate d = Delegate.CreateDelegate(fi.FieldType, null, targetMethod);
  14:       //Console.WriteLine(d);
  15:       fi.SetValue(servInstance, d);
  16:     }
  17:  
  18:     return servInstance;
  19:   }
  20: }

Remember, the client code still looks the same...

   1: public class App
   2: {
   3:   public static void Main(string[] args)
   4:   {
   5:     foreach (string s in args)
   6:     {
   7:       IService serv = ServiceFactory.GetInstance(s);
   8:       Console.WriteLine("serv calc = {0}", serv.CalculateSomethingInteresting(3, 3));
   9:     }
  10:   }
  11: }

... because what the client doesn't know is that he's accessing a field, then invoking the delegate that's being returned from that field dereference.

What this permits, aside from the automated wiring up of the IService "interface", is a greater degree of flexibility—rather than having to choose which implementation to use on an interface-by-interface basis, we can now configure to use different implementations on a method-by-method basis. But considering how many interfaces and implementations my client was looking at having to write by hand, the real win is in the automated ServiceFactory wiring.

By the way, the only reason we can get away with this sleight-of-hand is because delegates are deliberately designed to act like method calls; no explicit .Invoke() call is required, it's implied with the () after the delegate instance's name. If Java7 closures and/or method handles end up with support for that kind of syntax, then we can do the same thing in Java7 (more or less).

Make sense?


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Tuesday, December 08, 2009 11:25:18 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Comments [4]  | 
 Sunday, November 22, 2009
Book Review: Debug It! (Paul Butcher, Pragmatic Bookshelf)

Paul asked me to review this, his first book, and my comment to him was that he had a pretty high bar to match; being of the same "series" as Release It!, Mike Nygard's take on building software ready for production (and, in my repeatedly stated opinion, the most important-to-read book of the decade), Debug It! had some pretty impressive shoes to fill. Paul's comment was pretty predictable: "Thanks for keeping the pressure to a minimum."

My copy arrived in the mail while I was at the NFJS show in Denver this past weekend, and with a certain amount of dread and excitement, I opened the envelope and sat down to read for a few minutes. I managed to get halfway through it before deciding I had to post a review before I get too caught up in my next trip and forget.

Short version

Debug It! is a great resource for anyone looking to learn the science of good debugging. It is entirely language- and platform-agnostic, preferring to focus entirely on the process and mindset of debugging, rather than on edge cases or command-line switches in a tool or language. Overall, the writing is clear and straightforward without being preachy or judgmental, and is liberally annotated with real-life case stories from both the authors' and the Pragmatic Programmers' own history, which keeps the tone lighter and yet still proving the point of the text. Highly recommended for the junior developers on the team; senior developers will likely find some good tidbits in here as well.

Long version

Debug It! is an excellently-written and to-the-point description of the process of not only identifying and fixing defects in software, but also of the attitudes required to keep software from failing. Rather than simply tossing off old maxims or warming them over with new terminology ("You should always verify the parameters to your procedure calls" replaced with "You should always verify the parameters entering a method and ensure the fields follow the invariants established in the specification"), Paul ensures that when making a point, his prose is clear, the rationale carefully explained, and the consequences of not following this advice are clearly spelled out. His advice is pragmatic, and takes into account that developers can't always follow the absolute rules we'd like to—he talks about some of his experiences with "bug priorities" and how users pretty quickly figured out to always set the bug's priority at the highest level in order to get developer attention, for example, and some ways to try and address that all-too-human failing of bug-tracking systems.

It needs to be said, right from the beginning, that Debug It! will not teach you how to use the debugging features of your favorite IDE, however. This is because Paul (deliberately, it seems) takes a platform- and language-agnostic approach to the book—there are no examples of how to set breakpoints in gdb, or how to attach the Visual Studio IDE to a running Windows service, for example. This will likely weed out those readers who are looking for "Google-able" answers to their common debugging problems, and that's a shame, because those are probably the very readers that need to read this book. Having said that, however, I like this agnostic approach, because these ideas and thought processes, the ones that are entirely independent of the language or platform, are exactly the kinds of things that senior developers carry over with them from one platform to the next. Still, the junior developer who picks this book up is going to still need a reference manual or the user manual for their IDE or toolchain, and will need to practice some with both books in hand if they want to maximize the effectiveness of what's in here.

One of the things I like most about this book is that it is liberally adorned with real-life discussions of various scenarios the author team has experienced; the reason I say "author team" here is because although the stories (for the most part) remain unattributed, there are obvious references to "Dave" and "Andy", which I assume pretty obviously refer to Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt, the Pragmatic Programmers and the owners of Pragmatic Bookshelf. Some of the stories are humorous, and some of them probably would be humorous if they didn't strike so close to my own bitterly-remembered experiences. All of them do a good job of reinforcing the point, however, thus rendering the prose more effective in communicating the idea without getting to be too preachy or bombastic.

The book obviously intends to target a junior developer audience, because most senior developers have already intuitively (or experientially) figured out many of the processes described in here. But, quite frankly, I think it would be a shame for senior developers to pass on this one; though the temptation will be to simply toss it aside and say, "I already do all this stuff", senior developers should resist that urge and read it through cover to cover. If nothing else, it'll help reinforce certain ideas, bring some of the intuitive process more to light and allow us to analyze what we do right and what we do wrong, and perhaps most importantly, give us a common backdrop against which we can mentor junior developers in the science of debugging.

One of the chapters I like in particular, "Chapter 7: Pragmatic Zero Tolerance", is particularly good reading for those shops that currently suffer from a deficit of management support for writing good software. In it, Paul talks specifically about some of the triage process about bugs ("When to fix bugs"), the mental approach developers should have to fixing bugs ("The debugging mind-set") and how to get started on creating good software out of bad ("How to dig yourself out of a quality hole"). These are techniques that a senior developer can bring to the team and implement at a grass-roots level, in many cases without management even being aware of what's going on. (It's a sad state of affairs that we sometimes have to work behind management's back to write good-quality code, but I know that some developers out there are in exactly that situation, and simply saying, "Quit and find a new job", although pithy and good for a laugh on a panel, doesn't really offer much in the way of help. Paul doesn't take that route here, and that alone makes this book worth reading.)

Another of the chapters that resonates well with me is the first one in Part III ("Debug Fu"), Chapter 8, entitled "Special Cases", in which he tackles a number of "advanced" debugging topics, such as "Patching Existing Releases" and "Hesenbugs" (Concurrency-related bugs). I won't spoil the punchline for you, but suffice it to say that I wish I'd had that chapter on hand to give out to teammates on a few projects I've worked on in the past.

Overall, this book is going to be a huge win, and I think it's a worthy successor to the Release It! reputation. Development managers and team leads should get a copy for the junior developers on their team as a Christmas gift, but only after the senior developers have read through it as well. (Senior devs, don't despair—at 190 pages, you can rip through this in a single night, and I can almost guarantee that you'll learn a few ideas you can put into practice the next morning to boot.)


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Sunday, November 22, 2009 11:24:41 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Thursday, November 19, 2009
Closures are back again!

Those of you who've seen me speak on Java 7 at various conferences have heard me lament (in a small way) the fact that Sun decided last year (Dec 2008) to forgo the idea of including closures in the Java language. Imagine my surprise, then, to check my Twitter feed and discover that, to everyone's surprise, closures are back in as a consideration for the Java7 release.

Several thoughts come to mind:

  • "WTF?!?!? This is a community effort?" Originally, when Sun created the Java Community Process, the tradeoff for a committee-based development process was against the open and fair inclusion of ideas from outside of Sun. But with the Java7 release still lacking a JSR (as of a few weeks ago, anyway; I haven't checked today to see if it was opened), and both the Modules facility and language extensions deferred to "Projects" (not JSRs), it seems Sun is now abandoning the JCP in favor of a Sun-dominant process that is certainly solicitous of the community at large, but not constrained or defined by it. And for the life of me, I can't tell if this is a good thing or a bad thing. It's good in that now we don't have to garner a critical mass of community momentum to get something included into the platform or language, but it's bad in that Sun has historically been the bigger drag on innovation there, not the community.
  • "Can we please stop calling them closures?" This is a nit, but technically what we're talking about adding here are either lambda expressions or anonymous methods, depending on whose glossary you're using when you're talking. A true closure is one that will compute all referenced variables from the enclosing scope and automatically include them in the generated code, which (so far as I can tell) none of the Java anonymous method or lambda expression proposals currently include. But it's a nit, so I'll say it this once and then drop it.
  • "Will Groovy, Scala, Clojure and all other JVM languages please report to the refactoring room?" People look at me quizzically when I say I'd like to see Java have closures in the language, because in general my take on language features in Java is that the Java language is more or less dead, and I could care less what happens to it; I'd vastly prefer to code in Groovy or Scala or Clojure or JRuby before writing something in Java. My rationale for wanting closures in Java, however, is this: by defining a common implementation for closures in Java, all of the above languages can refactor their implementations of anonymous methods/lambda expressions/etc into something that uses Java's closure implementation, and that'll make calling Groovy anonymous methods from Scala much much easier.
  • "Why there, now?" Devoxx is apparently turning into JavaOne Winter, because Sun's been making a lot of pretty big announcements at that show, including last year's "no closures, no built-in XML support, ..." announcement about Java7, and now this year's "well, we lied, we're thinking about closures again". Fortunately I think the Devoxx folks have much better skills at keeping their conference relevant to the Java community than JavaOne's organizers did. And I say that despite the fact (or perhaps because of the fact) that I didn't speak there this year. ;-)
  • "When is this all supposed to ship again?" Originally, my understanding was that JDK7 was slated to ship in the early part of 2010, but now rumor has it slipping to this time next year (2010). That is a huge postponement, and gives Microsoft a bit of an edge, since Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4.0 are (again, according to rumor) supposed to ship somewhere around the end of 1Q2010. If Sun/Oracle keeps this up, we could very well be seeing a 2-.NET-releases-to-1-Java-release pattern, and that's disturbing in its own right. (Anybody else remember the days when Sun withdrew Java from ECMA, ISO and ANSI standardization consideration because they wanted to "innovate on the platform faster"?)
  • "We really have no clue what we're talking about." Aside from rumors and hearsay (including the one that says that Mark Reinhold, who made the announcement, made up the syntax on the flight from the US to Belgium), we really don't have much by way of Sun-blessed official discussions of what this will look like or act like, at least none so far as I've been able to find, so any sort of supposition on whether it will be good or suck like an inverted hurricane is a tad premature. Trust me, I want to see where this goes, too, so I'll be keeping an eye out.

In the meantime, if you want to keep on top of the Java space, maybe it's time to consider a trip to Antwerp this time next year, since, if the new ship date rumors are to be believed,  it looks like Sun (once again) is planning to use Devoxx as the platform from which to make a large announcement, this time the release Java7 itself.


Update: Ola Bini noted that...

Two things:

  • They are definitely closures. Calling them anonymous functions are incorrect, since they aren't really functions. Lambda expression is an OK name, but it has connotations that aren't really correct for a language like Java. A closure is defined as an anonymous piece of code that closes over at least one free variable, which in the case of this proposal will definitely happen. In fact, all of these will be closures, since they will be closing over the this at least.
  • This is mostly on the level of compiler, syntax and type checking, and will NOT have any real implications for runtime. This means there will be no real sharing of implementation - at most JRuby, Groovy and Scala blocks will implement another interface (but all of them already implement Runnable and Callable so it's a limited win).

which prompted me to respond thusly:

First off, I actually never used the term "anonymous function"; instead, I said "anonymous method", which, as I understand it, is how the underlying implementation of these proposals will work: the syntax "#() return 42" will create an anonymous inner class instance of an interface defined by the library (in its "SimpleClosure" example, the BGGA compiler uses the interface "javax.lang.function.I", which has one method on it, "invoke()"), which, thus, makes this an anonymous method. We can't call them "anonymous functions" because Java has no function type, and probably never will. (And yes, it may seem like we're splitting hairs somewhat to differentiate between functions and methods,but once you've explored ML, Haskell, Scala, or F#, you really begin to see a huge difference in those terms, so it's important to be precise with our terminology, or else the conversation becomes almost entirely meaningless.)

Neal Gafter uses the definition "A closure is a function that captures the bindings of free variables in its lexical context." (http://gafter.blogspot.com/2007/01/definition-of-closures.html) Given that said same post also claims that Java has no function type (and therefore, by his definition, can't really have a closure), I suppose we could split the hairs even further and suggest that Java will never have closures until it has true function types. Personally, I'm happy to say that we can swap in "methods" for "functions" in this particular discussion, but my understanding is that capturing free variables also implies capturing variables referenced in the enclosing lexical context, which the current "closures" proposal (as reported by Alex Miller's closures page) will not do. (Non-final enclosing parameters will not be accessible, only those passed in formally as parameters. Stephen Colebourne reports as much: "[Mark Reinhold] also indicated that access to non-final variables was unlikely.")

Given that the current proposal suggests the new #() syntax will essentially generate an anonymous inner class with a method of the appropriate signature (though I do believe that method handles are targeted for use at some point, based on what I've been hearing through the rumor mill), to me it feels like the "closures" implementation is generating an anonymous method of an anonymous class with a few other restrictions included--hence my commentary above.

(Having said all that, the FCM proposal does provide complete capture of all referenced variables in enclosing scope, but Mark's keynote hasn't officially endorsed either the BGGA proposal or the FCM proposal, and if Sun keeps to their habits, they won't. They'll build something that's an amalgamation of all of them. Right now the current consensus seems to be to adopt the BGGA implementation behind the FCM syntax, which jives with Neal's 0.6a specification proposal.)

On top of that, the comment "all of these will be closures, since they will be closing over the this at least" is not, I don't think, entirely true. The details of the closures proposal aren't clear, but the "outer this" (which I believe is the "this" Ola refers to above) hasn't been explicitly mentioned in any of the closures proposals I've seen, nor have I seen any text suggesting that they will honor it, so I don't know that this is true. Of course, in absence of a specification or real working bits, all we can do is just speculate. However, having said that, playing around a bit with the BGGA prototype compiler (which, admittedly, is still one minor rev back from Neal's revised proposal), I saw no generated "outer this" in the generated code for the generated inner class implementation of the closure. If the comment above is meant to refer to the "this" of the inner class instance, then that would make all methods of an object-oriented language that provided an implicit "this" a closure, and somehow I doubt that's what Ola means, though I could, as always, be wrong.

As for the runtime implementation, as I said earlier I believe the plan is to use method handles (already on the table for JDK 7), which do have some runtime implications (generally good ones, from what I can tell so far), but not beyond what was already on the table for 7.


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Thursday, November 19, 2009 12:10:11 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Tuesday, October 13, 2009
Haacked, but not content; agile still treats the disease

Phil Haack wrote a thoughtful, insightful and absolutely correct response to my earlier blog post. But he's still missing the point.

The short version: Phil's right when he says, "Agile is less about managing the complexity of an application itself and more about managing the complexity of building an application." Agile is by far the best approach to take when building complex software.

But that's not where I'm going with this.

As a starting point in the discussion, I'd like to call attention to one of Phil's sidebars: I find it curious (and indicative of the larger point) his earlier comment about "I have to wonder, why is that little school district in western Pennsylvania engaging in custom software development in the first place?" At what point does standing a small Access database up qualify as "custom software development"? And I take huge issue with Phil's comment immediately thereafter: "" That's totally untrue, Phil—you are, in fact, creating custom educational curricula, for your children at home. Not for popular usage, not for commercial use, but clearly you're educating your children at home, because you'd be a pretty crappy parent if you didn't. You also practice an informal form of medicine ("Let me kiss the boo-boo"), psychology ("Now, come on, share the truck"), culinary arts ("Would you like mac and cheese tonight?"), acting ("Aaar! I'm the Tickle Monster!") and a vastly larger array of "professional" skills that any of the "professionals" will do vastly better than you.

In other words, you're not a professional actor/chef/shrink/doctor, you're an amateur one, and you want tools that let you practice your amateur "professions" as you wish, without requiring the skills and trappings (and overhead) of a professional in the same arena.

Consider this, Phil: your child decides it's time to have a puppy. (We all know the kids are the ones who make these choices, not us, right?) So, being the conscientious parent that you are, you decide to build a doghouse for the new puppy to use to sleep outdoors (forgetting, as all parents do, that the puppy will actually end up sleeping in the bed with your child, but that's another discussion for another day). So immediately you head on down to Home Depot, grab some lumber, some nails, maybe a hammer and a screwdriver, some paint, and head on home.

Whoa, there, turbo. Aren't you forgetting a few things? For starters, you need to get the concrete for the foundation, rebar to support the concrete in the event of a bad earthquake, drywall, fire extinguishers, sirens for the emergency exit doors... And of course, you'll need a foreman to coordinate all the work, to make sure the foundation is poured before the carpenters show up to put up the trusses, which in turn has to happen before the drywall can go up...

We in this industry have a jealous and irrational attitude towards the amateur software developer. This was even apparent in the Twitter comments that accompanied the conversation around my blog post: "@tedneward treating the disease would mean... have the client have all their ideas correct from the start" (from @kelps). In other words, "bad client! No biscuit!"?

Why is it that we, IT professionals, consider anything that involves doing something other than simply putting content into an application to be "custom software development"? Why can't end-users create tools of their own to solve their own problems at a scale appropriate to their local problem?

Phil offers a few examples of why end-users creating their own tools is a Bad Idea:

I remember one rescue operation for a company drowning in the complexity of a “simple” Access application they used to run their business. It was simple until they started adding new business processes they needed to track. It was simple until they started emailing copies around and were unsure which was the “master copy”. Not to mention all the data integrity issues and difficulty in changing the monolithic procedural application code.

I also remember helping a teachers union who started off with a simple attendance tracker style app (to use an example Ted mentions) and just scaled it up to an atrociously complex Access database with stranded data and manual processes where they printed excel spreadsheets to paper, then manually entered it into another application.

And you know what?

This is not a bad state of affairs.

Oh, of course, we, the IT professionals, will immediately pounce on all the things wrong with their attempts to extend the once-simple application/solution in ways beyond its capabilities, and we will scoff at their solutions, but you know what? That just speaks to our insecurities, not the effort expended. You think Wolfgang Puck isn't going to throw back his head and roar at my lame attempts at culinary experimentation? You think Frank Lloyd Wright wouldn't cringe in horror at my cobbled-together doghouse? And I'll bet Maya Angelou will be so shocked at the ugliness of my poetry that she'll post it somewhere on the "So You Think You're A Poet" website.

Does that mean I need to abandon my efforts to all of these things?

The agilists' community reaction to my post would seem to imply so. "If you aren't a professional, don't even attempt this?" Really? Is that the message we're preaching these days?

End users have just as much a desire and right to be amateur software developers as we do at being amateur cooks, photographers, poets, construction foremen, and musicians. And what do you do when you want to add an addition to your house instead of just building a doghouse? Or when you want to cook for several hundred people instead of just your family?

You hire a professional, and let them do the project professionally.


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Tuesday, October 13, 2009 1:42:22 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Monday, October 12, 2009
"Agile is treating the symptoms, not the disease"

The above quote was tossed off by Billy Hollis at the patterns&practices Summit this week in Redmond. I passed the quote out to the Twitter masses, along with my +1, and predictably, the comments started coming in shortly thereafter. Rather than limit the thoughts to the 120 or so characters that Twitter limits us to, I thought this subject deserved some greater expansion.

But before I do, let me try (badly) to paraphrase the lightning talk that Billy gave here, which sets context for the discussion:

  • Keeping track of all the stuff Microsoft is releasing is hard work: LINQ, EF, Silverlight, ASP.NET MVC, Enterprise Library, Azure, Prism, Sparkle, MEF, WCF, WF, WPF, InfoCard, CardSpace, the list goes on and on, and frankly, nobody (and I mean nobody) can track it all.
  • Microsoft released all this stuff because they were chasing the "enterprise" part of the developer/business curve, as opposed to the "long tail" part of the curve that they used to chase down. They did this because they believed that this was good business practice—like banks, "enterprises are where the money is". (If you're not familiar with this curve, imagine a graph with a single curve asymptotically reaching for both axes, where Y is the number of developers on the project, and X is the number of projects. What you get is a curve of a few high-developer-population projects on the left, to a large number of projects with just 1 or 2 developers. This right-hand portion of the curve is known as "the long tail" of the software industry.)
  • A lot of software written back in the 90's was written by 1 or 2 guys working for just a few months to slam something out and see if it was useful. What chances do those kinds of projects have today? What tools would you use to build them?
  • The problem is the complexity of the tools we have available to us today preclude that kind of software development.
  • Agile doesn't solve this problem—the agile movement suggests that we have to create story cards, we have to build unit tests, we have to have a continuous integration server, we have to have standup meetings every day, .... In short, particularly among the agile evangelists (by which we really mean zealots), if you aren't doing a full agile process, you are simply failing. (If this is true, how on earth did all those thousands of applications written in FoxPro or Access ever manage to succeed? –-Me) At one point, an agilist said point-blank, "If you don't do agile, what happens when your project reaches a thousand users?" As Billy put it, "Think about that for a second: This agile guy is threatening us with success."
  • Agile is for managing complexity. What we need is to recognize that there is a place for outright simplicity instead.

By the way, let me say this out loud: if you have not heard Billy Hollis speak, you should. Even if you're a Java or Ruby developer, you should listen to what he has to say. He's been developing software for a long time, has seen a lot of these technology-industry trends come and go, and even if you disagree with him, you need to listen to him.

Let me rephrase Billy's talk this way:

Where is this decade's Access?

It may seem like a snarky and trolling question, but think about it for a moment: for a decade or so, I was brought into project after project that was designed to essentially rebuild/rearchitect the Access database created by one of the department's more tech-savvy employees into something that could scale beyond just the department.

(Actually, in about half of them, the goal wasn't even to scale it up, it was just to put it on the web. It was only in the subsequent meetings and discussions that the issues of scale came up, and if my memory is accurate, I was the one who raised those issues, not the customer. I wonder now, looking back at it, if that was pure gold-plating on my part.)

Others, including many people I care about (Rod Paddock, Markus Eggers, Ken Levy, Cathi Gero, for starters) made a healthy living off of building "line of business" applications in FoxPro, which Microsoft has now officially shut down. For those who did Office applications, Visual Basic for Applications has now been officially deprecated in favor of VSTO (Visual Studio Tools for Office), a set of libraries that are available for use by any .NET application language, and of course classic Visual Basic itself has been "brought into the fold" by making it a fully-fledged object-oriented language complete with XML literals and LINQ query capabilities.

Which means, if somebody working for a small school district in western Pennsylvania wants to build a simple application for tracking students' attendance (rather than tracking it on paper anymore), what do they do?

Bruce Tate alluded to this in his Beyond Java, based on the realization that the Java space was no better—to bring a college/university student up to speed on all the necessary technologies required of a "productive" Java developer, he calculated at least five or six weeks of training was required. And that's not a bad estimate, and might even be a bit on the shortened side. You can maybe get away with less if they're joining a team which collectively has these skills distributed across the entire team, but if we're talking about a standalone developer who's going to be building software by himself, it's a pretty impressive list. Here's my back-of-the-envelope calculations:

  • Week one: Java language. (Nobody ever comes out of college knowing all the Java language they need.)
  • Week two: Java virtual machine: threading/concurrency, ClassLoaders, Serialization, RMI, XML parsing, reference types (weak, soft, phantom).
  • Week three: Infrastructure: Ant, JUnit, continuous integration, Spring.
  • Week four: Data access: JDBC, Hibernate. (Yes, I think you need a full week on Hibernate to be able to use it effectively.)
  • Week five: Web: HTTP, HTML, servlets, filters, servlet context and listeners, JSP, model-view-controller, and probably some Ajax to boot.

I could go on (seriously! no JMS? no REST? no Web services?), but you get the point. And lest the .NET community start feeling complacent, put together a similar list for the standalone .NET developer, and you'll come out to something pretty equivalent. (Just look at the Pluralsight list of courses—name the one course you would give that college kid to bring him up to speed. Stumped? Don't feel bad—I can't, either. And it's not them—pick on any of the training companies.)

Now throw agile into that mix: how does an agile process reduce the complexity load? And the answer, of course, is that it doesn't—it simply tries to muddle through as best it can, by doing all of the things that developers need to be doing: gathering as much feedback from every corner of their world as they can, through tests, customer interaction, and frequent releases. All of which is good. I'm not here to suggest that we should all give up agile and immediately go back to waterfall and Big Design Up Front. Anybody who uses Billy's quote as a sound bite to suggest that is a subversive and a terrorist and should have their arguments refuted with extreme prejudice.

But agile is not going to reduce the technology complexity load, which is the root cause of the problem.

Or, perhaps, let me ask it this way: your 16-year-old wants to build a system to track the cards in his Magic deck. What language do you teach him?

We are in desperate need of simplicity in this industry. Whoever gets that, and gets it right, defines the "Next Big Thing".


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Monday, October 12, 2009 4:51:39 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Saturday, August 15, 2009
Are you a language wonk? Do you want to be?

Recently I've had the pleasure to make the acquaintance of Walter Bright, one of the heavyweights of compiler construction, and the creator of the D language (among other things), and he's been great in giving me some hand-holding on some compiler-related topics and ideas.

Thus, it seems appropriate to point out that Walter's willing to give lots of other people the same kind of attention and focus, in exchange for your presence in gorgeous Astoria, OR. The Astoria Compiler Construction Seminar is Walter teaching you about the nuts and bolts of building a compiler, from start to finish:

  • Introduction to Compilers
  • Lexing and Parsing
  • Semantic Analysis
  • Intermediate Representation
  • Interpreters
  • Optimization
  • Code Generation
  • Special Topics (thread-local storage, exception-handling, and so on)
  • Building a Compiler for .NET

If you've got any interest whatsoever in building a language, but you're not sure how or where to get started, this seems like a great chance to sit down with one of the "big boys" and find out how to do it. And it doesn't hurt that Walter's an extremely pleasant guy to hang out with, either. :-) (It doesn't hurt that he was the one who created the original Empire game, either. So at least you know you'll have something to play during the breaks.)

Go. Sign up. You'll thank me later.


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Saturday, August 15, 2009 10:44:30 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Tuesday, July 28, 2009
More on journalistic integrity: Sys-Con, Ulitzer, theft and libel

Recently, an email crossed my Inbox from a friend who was concerned about some questionable practices involving my content (as well as a few others'); apparently, I have been listed as an "author" for SysCon, I have a "domain" with them, and that I've been writing for them since 10 January, 2003, including two articles, "Effective Enterprise Java" and "Java/.NET Interoperability".

Given that both of those "articles" are summaries from presentations I've done at conferences past, I'm a touch skeptical. In fact, it feels like those summaries were scraped from conferences I've done in the past, and I certainly don't remember ever giving Sys-Con (or any other conference) the right to reprint my presentation as an article.

Then it turns out that apparently I'm not the only one suffering this problem. Go. Read that article, then come back. I promise, I'll wait.

(Seriously, go read it.)

Wow. Just... wow. If even half of what Aral's story is true (and I'm inclined to believe at least part of it, given that he's done some pretty meticulous documentation of at least his side of the story), then this is beyond outrageous, and squarely into "completely unethical".

Now, I'll be the first to admit, I've not heard back from Sys-Con about any of this, so if I get any sort of response I'll be sure to update this blog post. But...

Calling anyone a "homosexual son of a bitch", "terrorist" or "fag" is so unbelievably offensive it staggers the mind. Normally, I'd be a bit hesitant to just give either party the benefit of the doubt on that one, given just how ludicrous the accusation sounds, but Aral includes screen shots of the articles, which in of itself lends an air of credibility to the accusation—either Aral is the world's worst Turkish translator, or Sys-Con's translation into Turkish is a bit on the "edgy" side, or Sys-Con really did call him that. Which implies that whichever way this goes, doesn't look good for one of the two parties. But even if we leave that to one side....

Sys-Con is playing with fire by collecting my content and claiming me as an author. Sys-Con never contacted me about becoming a part of their "Ulitzer" website. They never asked me for permission to reprint my articles, though, I'll admit, I can't find where the articles actually exist, nor links to the articles, so maybe they didn't, actually, reprint the article, but just link to them... except I can't find the links to the articles or the presentations, either. They never asked me for an updated bio or photo, and in fact, they pretty clearly grabbed both bio, photo and "summaries" from an old location, because that bio lists me as a DevelopMentor instructor (which I haven't been for two years or so), and as living in Sacramento, CA (which I haven't been for about three years or so). Let me be very clear about this: I do not write for Sys-Con Media. I never have. They have never asked permission to reuse any of the content I have produced. I am appalled at being included in such a fashion.

Note that I'm not opposed to being linked to, mind you—if I put material on my blog, I generally expect (and hope) that people will link to it, and I don't demand permission or even notification when it happens. But to claim that I've written material for an entity does mean I expect to at least be asked if it's OK to use my likeness, name, or material. No such request was ever made of me, so far as I can remember or find (through my own email archives, which stretch back to 2001).

And I can say that I've thought about this issue before, from the other side of the story—back when I was editor at TheServerSide.NET, we began a "blogger's program" that would take interesting blog posts from around the Internet and "collect" them in some fashion for TSS.NET readers. Originally, the thought was to simply reproduce the content directly on our site, and I hated that idea, for the same reasons as I dislike it when somebody does it to me. Regardless of the licensing model the blog entries are published under, to me, a publication or media firm owes the author at least the right of refusal, and a chance to be notified when their material is reused. (In the end, we chose to ask authors if we could reproduce their material in the program, and we never (to my knowledge) had an author refuse.) It doesn't take a real rocket scientist's brain to figure out that asking permission is never a bad thing to do if you want to maintain good will with your sources of material.

This is an open and public request to Sys-Con media: either contact me about using my name, likeness and material on your website, or remove it. (I have emailed their editorial and asked them to acknowledge receipt of my request.)

In the meantime, I will be making every effort to make sure that other content-producers I know are aware of Sys-Con's practices, so they can act as they see fit.

If you are a reader, and find this distasteful as well, then I suggest you follow some of the suggestions mentioned in Aral's blog post:

    • Tell everyone you know about what Sys-Con is doing (but don't link to them so as not to give them Google Juice). If tweeting, leave out the http:// bit so that your URL is not automatically made into a link.
    • Sys-Con feeds upon the work of authors and speakers to live. If all authors had their content removed from Sys-Con and Ulitzer, they would not have pages to put ads on. So go through their list of authors and notify the ones you know. If they are unaware that they're listed there, they will most likely want themselves removed. Update: I've created a single list of all Sys-Con's Ulitzer authors. More information and the full list are in this post. The original list of authors is at http://www.ulitzer.com/?q=authors. You can ask for your Ulitzer/Sys-Con author page to be removed by emailing editorial@sys-con.com.
    • Contact their advertisers and tell them what you think of their association with Sys-Con.
    • If you know any speakers speaking at Sys-Con events, make sure they know the kind of company they are associating themselves with. Do the same with anyone you know who is thinking of attending one of their events. Raise awareness about their events at your place of work.
    • Make sure Google knows that Sys-Con/Ulitzer is spamming Google with tons of duplicate content. Report them on Google's spam page for posting duplicate content. According to their terms and conditions, Google should stop indexing Sys-Con/Ulitzer. See this comment for a template you can use when reporting them.
    • Make sure Google News knows that they are syndicating libelous articles from Sys-Con. Use the Google News Report an Issue form to report the following articles: http://internetvideo.sys-con.com/node/1017038, http://internetvideo.sys-con.com/node/1028923, http://www.sys-con.com/node/1035252, http://air.ulitzer.com/node/1038383, http://openwebdeveloper.sys-con.com/node/1039556, and http://cloudcomputing.sys-con.com/node/1047589

Meanwhile, I'm going to be talking about this to everybody I know at Microsoft, desperately seeking to find out which department engaged the advertising with Sys-Con, and looking to convince them that they don't need this kind of press or association. Ditto for the contacts (far fewer in number) I have with IBM, and any other Sys-Con advertiser I find.


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Tuesday, July 28, 2009 6:58:00 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
Comments [3]  | 
 Saturday, June 27, 2009
Review: "Programming Clojure", by Stu Halloway

(Disclaimer: In the spirit of full disclosure, Stu is a friend, fellow NFJS speaker, and former co-worker of mine from DevelopMentor.)

I present this review to you in two parts.

Short version: If you want to learn Clojure, and you're familiar with at least one programming language, you'll find this a great resource. If you don't already know a programming language, or if you already know Clojure, or if you're looking for "best practices" to cut-and-paste, you're going to be disappointed.

Long version: Recently, fellow NFJS speaker Stu Halloway decided to take up a new language, and came to Clojure. He found the language interesting enough to write a book on it, something he hasn't done since his Java days, and the result is a nice walk through the language and its environment for experienced Java developers who want to understand Clojure's language, concurrency concepts, and programming model.

Now, let's be 100% honest about this: if you're coming at this book expecting it to be a language reference, you will probably be disappointed (as this guy obviously is). Stu's not like that—he's not going to re-create material that's available elsewhere, or that can be found with an easy Google search. Stu will not waste your time that way—he wants to tell you a story, one that takes you from "I'm a Java guy, but clueless about Lisp, dynamic languages, functional programming, concurrency, or macros" to "Wow. I know kung-fu." in the shortest path possible, but without trying to lobotomize you. He wants—no, expects—the readers of his book to be propping the text open with a cell phone on one side and the dinner plate on the other, craning your neck over to scan the pages and type in the examples into the REPL shell to try them out, see them work, then spend a few minutes experimenting with them before moving on to the next paragraph or page.

(Oh, I suppose you could just cut and paste them from the PDF version of the book, but where's the fun in that?)

The fact is, the concepts behind Clojure make up what's important to learn here, and readers of this book will come away like the panda from the movie, realizing that "There is no Secret Ingredient", that the power of Clojure comes not from its super-secret language sauce or special libraries, but in the way Clojure programmers approach problems and think about programming. And for that reason, if you're a programmer—even if you don't program on the JVM—you really want to take a look at what Stu's talking about (and Rich Hickey is creating).

Just remember, cellphone and dinner plate. Otherwise you'll be missing out on so much.


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Saturday, June 27, 2009 10:34:56 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Thursday, June 18, 2009
Interview with Scott Bellware and Scott Hanselman on the Death of the Professional Speaker

Well, OK, the title is trolling ever so slightly, but there is an interesting trend at work, and I'm genuinely concerned about its ultimate expression if the trend continues to its logical conclusion. Have a look and tell me if you agree or disagree.


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Thursday, June 18, 2009 6:40:28 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Sunday, June 14, 2009
The "controversy" continues

Apparently the Rails community isn't the only one pursuing that ephemeral goal of "edginess"—another blatantly sexist presentation came off without a hitch, this time at a Flash conference, and if anything, it was worse than the Rails/CouchDB presentation. I excerpt a few choice tidbits from an eyewitness here, but be warned—if you're not comfortable with language, skip the next block paragraph.

Yesterday's afternoon keynote is this guy named Hoss Gifford — I believe his major claim to fame is that viral "spank the monkey" thing that went around a few years back.  Highlights of his talk:

  • He opens his keynote with one of those "Ignite"-esque presentations — where you have 5-minutes and 20 slides to tell a story — and the first and last are a close-up of a woman's lower half, her legs spread (wearing stilettos, of course) and her shaved vagina visible through some see-thru panties that say "drink me," with Hoss's Photoshopped, upward-looking face placed below it.
  • He later demos a drawing tool he has created (admittedly with someone else's code) and invites a woman to come up to try it.  After she sits back down, he points out that in her doodles she's drawn a "cock."
  • Then he decides he wants to give a try at using the tool to draw a "cock" (he loves this word) — and draws a face, then a giant dick (he redraws it three times) that ultimately cums all over the face.
  • A multitude of references to penises and lots of swearing — and also "If you are easily offended, fuck you!"
  • And then, to top it off, a self-made flash movie of an animated woman's face, positioned as if she's having sex with you, who gradually orgasms based on the speed of your mouse movement on the page.

Wow. Just... wow. To call this unprofessional smacks of calling Hitler a "socially awkward individual"... or using a euphemism like "mild medical condition" to refer to death. This is so far "over the line" that it's unbelievable. Even Mr. Aimonetti's "CouchDB" presentation, as bad as it was, at least tried to tie the analogy together in a meaningful, if offensive, way. This is just male posturing at its worst. (I'm shocked Hoss didn't whip off his pants and demand the women in the room bow down in worship to his obviously superior manhood.)

Fortunately, according to the source, the conference organizer seems to be pretty responsive, so kudos to the one adult in the room, but....

What's worse, apparently the presenter and more than a few of his pals are (in the best traditions of assholery) blatantly unrepentant about the whole thing, claiming the moral high ground in much the same way that the Rails idiots did—it's all in good fun, if you don't find it funny you're a prude, and so on:

I checked Twitter (hashtag #flashbelt) to see what the responses were.  Here are some notable remarks:

  • Fonx is reading the #flashbelt rants on Hoss offending the ladies w/ a few swear words & a penis drawing - r u really that prudish & sexist?
  • nthitz lol @hoss69 "If you are easily offended, fuck you" #flashbelt
  • livenootrac Ladies of #flashbelt , I am sorry for the Hoss preso, but in the flash community he gets a pass, kinda like Don Rickles - that's just Hoss.
  • CujoJpn @livenootrac And there were many ladies at #flashbelt who were offended by Hoss' Preso some were thick skinned and took it as is.

So, if you didn't like it then
a) you are a prude - and sexist (?)
b) fuck you
c) suck it because Hoss gets a pass here in the boy's club known as "the flash community" and
d) you are a wimpy girl who isn't strong enough / man enough / "thick-skinned" enough  to deal with it.

Even more... wow. Talk about justification and marginalization. Amazing.

Before I figuratively smack this Hoss guy around the blog for a while, let's take a brief moment for reflection—what's going on here? Why all the misogynistic presentations recently? Is this reflective of a general trend in the programming industry? Of society in general? Is the world coming to an end?

A few possibilities present themselves:

  • The lack of women in the IT industry means there's nobody around to act as a "gender filter" to keep things on an even keel. In other words, the genders constantly filter themselves based on the company they keep, and because the boys who put these presentations together don't have female input, they simply don't know where to draw the line for mixed company. This theory also presumes that an industry that's made up primarily of women will also lack such a filter and "girls will be girls" as a result. Unfortunately I have no good counterexamples at hand to examine—anybody know of an industry populated primarily by women, and can weigh in with experience there? The closest I get is my brief experience working in a restaurant with an almost-all-woman serving staff, and from that brief experience, yep, the theory holds. Solution? Easy: get more women in IT, and things will re-balance themselves naturally.
  • Programmers are principally males who have no redeeming social skills. In other words, the industry gathers up exactly the kind of men who find objectifying women and reveling in late-acquired testosterone overdoses to be gratifying, and this kind of behavior is the result. If true, it leads to the conclusion that programmers are no more evolved than the Navy sailors involved in the Tailhook scandal of a few years ago. So go ahead, smack your wives and girlfriends around a little if they get a little "uppity", it's OK, 'cuz u r a l33t d00d. Personally? I find the idea ludicrous—there is definitely a strong antisocial streak that runs through the IT ecosystem (how many of you met your friends via World of Warcraft again?), but like all stereotypes, there's some elements of truth to it, and a lot of exaggeration. And frankly, anybody who believes in this theory is welcome to come with me to dinner at a No Fluff Just Stuff show and meet the other speakers, and listen in on our "boys club" conversations, including questions like, "Which movie best represents the book it was made after?" and "If given a mandate to create a programming language, what language would your language most resemble?". Oh, and the odd fart joke. We are boys, after all.
  • We're hypersensitive to the subject right now. In other words, these kind of presentations have always been going on, and it's just that we notice them now, in the same way that you notice a particular brand of car on the road a lot more when you're thinking about buying that brand and model of car. Frankly, I don't buy this argument—I've been to a lot of presentations over the past decade, and I've never seen any that were anything like this.
  • This is the YouTube generation, with access to everything the Internet has to offer, and this is "just how they do things". After all, how much maturity, sexual discretion and adult behavior can we expect of the generation that gave us "Girls Gone Wild" and its ilk? It's just a "generation gap" thing, and we old fogies who didn't grow up with Internet porn just a browser-click away just don't "get it". Hmm.... somehow, I just don't buy it. Sure, there may be some elements of this involved here (I'm really curious to see what all these "Girls Gone Wild" girls are going to say to their own daughters in a decade or so...), but I think that's too easy an answer, and an eminently unhelpful one.
  • We have copycatters out there trying to follow the path of people they respect. If you're looking up at this Hoss character and thinking, "I want to be just like him!", you really should see a therapist and develop a sense of self, before you find yourself without friends. Hoss gets a pass because of your misguided fan-boi hero-worship. So does Paris Hilton. You want to be the Paris Hilton of your social circle? Go for it. After all, she's highly respected and loved, right? Take a clue from the next car wreck you drive past—everybody's slowing to look not because they wish they were in the body bag, folks, but because we have a ghoulish fascination with it. In the case of Ms. Hilton, that ghoulish fascination is with those who self-destruct in spectacular fashion. (Me, I'd love to be the fly on the wall at the Hoss residence when he tries to explain this whole thing to his daughter or his date/girlfriend/wife, if he ever finds one.)
  • The presenters taking this tack are looking for an easy path to fame. In the grand traditions of Andrew Dice Clay ("Oh!"), the easiest way for a presenter to "stand out" from the rest of the crowd of presenters is to do something outrageous and call it "edgy", and stake out a claim on the edge of the civilization, rather than try to integrate with the rest of the crowd and build something up slowly. Don Box has already claimed "HTTP is dead", I made the analogy between a technology and a military conflict, and Matt Aimonetti claimed a data storage framework "performs like a pr0n star", so what's left but to stake out ground even further out on the fringe and just be misogynistic? Fortunately, history suggests that people with content-free/shock-heavy presentations (or even content-heavy/shock-heavy ones) don't go the distance, so to speak, and that once there's nowhere more shocking left to go, the audience comes back to the content-heavy/shock-light discussions and stays there for a while. Unfortunately, this means we're going to have to suffer through somebody's "Live YouPorn filming" talk first, which I'm not looking forward to.

And now for the smacking around... but you know, I suddenly realize that the volume of comments on the original post leave with nothing to do or say that's not already being said, so to just "pile on" would only serve to let me vent, and I have other outlets for that. But it would be inappropriate to just "walk away", so to speak, so with that in mind....

Hoss, you're an idiot. Like any sprinter, you're going to head up the pack for a bit, but soon enough, your "shtick" is going to flame out and you'll be left behind with all the other "shock jocks" of the 80's who found their material unwelcome after a while. So enjoy the spotlight (such as it is) while you can. In the meantime, I'm off to revise a few presentations, and stick with solid ideas and analogies, and maybe dropping the odd F-bomb when I want to make a point, just for emphasis, because I know something you apparently don't:

Shock makes a point because of the contrast to the rest of the talk, not because of its inherent "edginess".

Meanwhile, by all means, continue to be an idiot. You just make me look better by comparison, for which I thank you.


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Sunday, June 14, 2009 3:17:44 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Thursday, April 30, 2009
On speaking, trolling, inciting and growing

It's been going around in developer circles now for a few days, this whole controversy about the "Perform like a pr0n star" presentation from the Golden Gate Ruby Conference and the related accusations of misogyny and sexism and overblown accusations and double-standardisms and what-all else, and I've deliberately waited to let opinions in my head settle out before blogging on the whole thing. Sara J Chipps reacts on her blog, and the comments to her comments are also somewhat... interesting... to note.

Without any particular implied importance or order:

  • Matt Aimonetti, you are an idiot. You had to know that this was going to generate more than a few strong reactions. I'll admit, it's a funny title, and it definitely generated a ton of buzz around your name, but for the rest of your life, you're going to be "the porno Rails guy", and in about a year or so, it's not going to be funny anymore. You've touched off a firestorm, and you can't very well hide from it, and frankly, I think the short-term boost to your public recognizance is going to be more than outweighed by the long-term judgments that will be levied against you. "Wait, this is the guy who did that talk? Wow. I bet he's a good developer, but can I risk him pulling the same kind of stunt at a meeting with our VP or clients? Nah, I'll go for this other guy...."
  • Clearly we have a lot of issues to work out in the programming industry. I'm not going to go into the rights or wrongs of putting those images into his talk. I'm talking about the discussion that followed (one comment here says, "Matt Aimonetti is obviously an antisocial twerp still living in his mothers basement at the age of 35 who has never even been able to muster up the courage to actually talk to a real-life woman, let alone respect one.", and a follow-up comment says, "Great presentation, nevermind the jackasses, keep up the good work!"), and the fact that at no point in the time leading up to this presentation did anybody pull Mr. Aimonetti off to one side and say, "Dude, it was funny when we thought of it, sure, but it's time to stop." If ever we wanted to convince the rest of the world that the programming industry wasn't populated by a bunch of 13-year-olds giggling over the fact that somebody said, "Boobies".... well, maybe next year.
  • Ruby community, you have a long way to go if you want to convince people to spend money on you. Maybe you don't mind that corporations think that you guys are clearly unstable and immature. If/when you want to gain some degree of corporate acceptance, and maybe make it out of your parents' basement someday, you're going to have to learn that how you handle yourself in public goes a long way towards establishing peoples' attitudes towards you as professionals, and right now, you all collectively look like a bunch of 13-year-olds, what between this and DHH's famous "FUCK YOU" presentation of a few years ago. If you're OK with not being taken seriously, then cool, more power to you. But personally, I like the idea of making money at things I like to do and have fun doing, and you're not helping yourselves.
  • Why are we such prudes? Whether you agree or not with the rightness of the "porn" metaphor, you have to admit that there is factual basis in the bones of this particular comment: "This is probably the least offensive thing I've seen in 3 weeks." Glance at the billboards in the airport next time you're walking to the gate. Glance at the racks of magazines in the grocery store as you prepare to check out. Glance at the beer commercials on TV during prime-time. In every case, sexy, young, attractive, scantily-clad men and women seek to create an instinctive emotional reaction inside your head to subconsciously create a feel-good link between whatever product is being hawked and your id. Honestly, the photos in the presentation are hardly all that titillating—and a very long ways from the kind of commercials you can see on TV in Europe—so why are we getting up in arms over this?
  • Matt Aimonetti, you are an idiot. Notice how nobody's talking about the actual subject of your presentation? A good presenter knows that the message should never outstrip the delivery mechanism, just like a sauce should never overpower the flavor of the dish it accompanies. For all that the content of your presentation might have been spot-on, the lessons that might have been learned from the presentation have drowned in the "He's a pig!" "No he's not!" that has followed. Great job there, mate. Way to get your message across.
  • To the commenter on the presentation page who said, "ps [sic] feminism is dead", get a clue. Women still, on average, get paid less than men do for an equivalently-skilled employee in the same job. Maybe it's not $.50 to every $1 as it used to be, but so long as it's even measurable, there's work to be done. This industry in particular has absolutely no reason for gender discrimination in any form, since there's absolutely nothing "physical" about what we do. (Ditto for medicine and law, for that matter.)
  • Presentations reach far beyond just the attendees. One commenter on Sara's blog notes, "What an over reaction, there was nothing wrong with that presentation, i wouldn't show it to a board room but as far as showing it to a ruby developers conference then no probs." Frankly, that's a short-sighted attitude, making the presumption that someone of the suit-and-tie set (those supposedly inhabiting the "board room" where this kind of presentation isn't appropriate) wouldn't actually be in the audience at a ruby developers conference. Oh, granted, when in Rome, one has to expect Romans to act like Romans, but that just means that the Ruby community isn't welcome inside the board room, right? (Somehow I doubt this is what the numerous people who are trying to make money off of Ruby really want.) Fact is, that presentation is now captured by the Internet for all time, and it will forever be known as "The Ruby Porno Presentation", and it's an even money bet that somebody in that board room has seen the presentation (and the video, and the play-by-play from the people who had friends who had friends that were there....).
  • To the commenters who say, "You asked for it", get a clue. Commenters have suggested that the title should have clued people into what was coming: "I'm totally flabbergasted no one has stated the obvious here: if you see a presentation labeled "CouchDB: Perform like a pr0n star" and you choose to go to it, don't act all surprised when R-rated images are used as props." Sorry, no biscuit. Presenters use analogies and imagery all the time in their titles in order to "sell" their talks. Recently I was part of a talk that was labeled as a "smackdown"—did that mean the audience should have expected to see images of physical violence? If I title my next talk as something that's "hard-core", should you expect to see images of ball gags and snuff film clips? This is what happens when we co-opt terms like "smackdown" and "hard-core"—you can't fall back to the original meanings and then claim ignorance when people misunderstand how you're going to use them. (God only knows what Mr. Aimonetti would have done for a presentation on "Naked Objects". *shudder*)
  • Matt Aimonetti, you are an idiot. You could have had your joke and keep it tasteful too. You do, in fact, from time to time in the early part of the presentation: the photo of the "little blue pills" was perfect, offering a hint as to what you meant while keeping the double-entendre alive. Every single "objectionable" photo in that presentation could have been replaced by a more subtle one that kept everybody's mind on the subject and still got the point across. The fact that you resorted to the heavy-handed imagery only proves that you wanted to beat the audience's head with it.
  • Please, let the one-ups-manship stop. Can we please agree that moving and powerful presentations can be done without having to resort to cheap tricks? They almost always come off badly, particularly when you have to keep the gag running for a full hour or so. Anybody remember Marc Fleury's "Joker" retinue at TheServerSide a half-decade ago? Can you tell me what his presentation was about? Now, consider Dave Thomas' "Cargo Cults" talk from NFJS around the same time—what was he covering? If you were there for both talks, chances are you remember Dave's talk far better than you remember the Fleury keynote beyond the fact that he wore Joker face paint the entire time. Good presentations are about using humor to underscore and support the message, and not making humor the central point of the message. Think about that before you start reaching for the bad innuendo.
  • Is this really the kind of industry we want? Granted, it may seem like all of this is way overblown if you're a 25-year-old guy recently graduated from college and hacking on your first or second Rails project. "What do these grumpy idiots not understand about 'it's a joke'? My God, is everybody nuts? Are they trying to say that we can't have fun at work or with what we do?" To which all I can say is two things: one, check in with yourself five or ten years from now, when your daughters are learning about body images by staring at pictures of women who are entirely artificial (and yes, guys, those pictures you see are entirely artificial, having been touched up and enhanced in many ways), and two, you're more than welcome to have whatever jokes you like at whomever's expense you like, in private. This wasn't in private. A developer conference is not a private locale. More importantly, though, think about it—when you bring your girlfriend to work, do you want her hearing those same jokes that buddies toss off back and forth? What seems like "harmless fun" now, may have a very different feel to it for you a few years from now.

I'll freely admit, I drop profanity from time to time in my presentations. And to everyone who comes up afterwords (figuratively and literally) saying I shouldn't use such offensive language, I apologize, and point out that I did so in order to underscore the point, knowing that I'm taking that risk, and knowing that I may be required to offer up apologies after the fact for having offended them. (To date, those apologies still number in the single digits.) So perhaps I am no better than Mr. Aimonetti in the final accounting of things.

But all of this loses sight of a core principle. Regardless of the efficacy of his presentation, regardless of your feelings about the subject matter, regardless of your thoughts around the overblown-or-not nature of this discussion, a deeper principle is at stake here, that of professional presentation etiquette: Mr. Aimonetti, you owe an apology to anyone and everyone that was offended by your presentation (for whatever reason). Failure to deliver that, in my mind, equates to a personal and professional FAIL on your part.

When you stand up on stage, and you say something that somebody finds offensive, you owe that person an apology, even if you think their reasoning or rationale is bogus.

It's simple common courtesy.


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Thursday, April 30, 2009 11:03:32 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Wednesday, April 01, 2009
"Multi-core Mania": A Rebuttal

The Simple-Talk newsletter is a monthly e-zine that the folks over at Red Gate Software (makers of some pretty cool toys, including their ANTS Profiler, and recent inheritors of the Reflector utility legacy) produce, usually to good effect.

But this month carried with it an interesting editorial piece, which I reproduce in its entirety here:

When the market is slack, nothing succeeds better at tightening it up than promoting serial group-panic within the community. As an example of this, a wave of multi-core panic spread across the Internet about 18 months ago. IT organizations, it was said, urgently had to improve application performance by an order of magnitude in order to cope with rising demand. We wouldn't be able to meet that need because we were at the "end of the road" with regard to step changes in processor power and clock speed. Multi-core technology was the only sure route to improving the speed of applications but, unfortunately, our current "serial" programming techniques, and the limited multithreading capabilities of our programming languages and programmers, left us ill-equipped to exploit it. Multi-core mania gripped the industry.

However, the fever was surprisingly short-lived. Intel's "largest open-source effort ever" to provide a standard tool for writing multi-threaded code, caused little more than a ripple of interest. Various books, rushed out while the temperature soared, advocated the urgent need for new "multi-core-friendly" programming models, involving such things as "software pipelines". Interesting as they undoubtedly are, they sit stolidly on bookshelves, unread.

The truth is that it's simply not a big issue for the majority of people. Writing truly "concurrent" applications in languages such as C# is difficult, as you get very little help from the language. It means getting involved with low-level concurrency primitives, such as lock statements and so on.

Many programmers lack the skills to do this, but more pertinently lack the need. Increasingly, programmers work in a web environment. As long as these web applications are deployed to a load-balanced web farm, then page requests can be handled in parallel so all available cores will be used efficiently without the need for the programmer to be concerned with fine-grained parallelism.

Furthermore, the SQL Server engine behind these web applications is intrinsically "parallel", and can handle and use effectively about as many cores as you care to throw at it. SQL itself is a declarative rather than procedural language, so it is fundamentally concurrent.

A minority of programmers, for example games programmers or those who deal with "embarrassingly parallel" desktop applications such as Photoshop, do need to start working with the current tools and 'low-level' coding techniques that will allow them to exploit multi-core technology. Although currently perceived to be more of "academic" interest, concurrent languages such as Erlang, and concurrency techniques such as "software transactional memory", may yet prove to be significant.

For most programmers and for most web applications, however, the multi-core furore is a storm in a teacup; it's just not relevant. The web and database platforms already cope with concurrency requirements. We are already doing it.

My hope is that this newsletter, sent on April 1st, was intended to be a joke. Having said that, I can’t find any verbage in the email that suggests that it is, in which case, I have to treat it as a legitimate editorial.

And frankly, I think it’s all crap.

It's dangerously ostrichian in nature—it encourages developers to simply bury their heads in the sand and ignore the freight train that's coming their way. Permit me, if you will, a few minutes of your time, that I may be allowed to go through and demonstrate the reasons why I say this.

To begin ...

When the market is slack, nothing succeeds better at tightening it up than promoting serial group-panic within the community. As an example of this, a wave of multi-core panic spread across the Internet about 18 months ago. IT organizations, it was said, urgently had to improve application performance by an order of magnitude in order to cope with rising demand. [...] Multi-core mania gripped the industry.

Point of fact: The “panic” cited here didn’t start about 18 months ago, it started with Herb Sutter’s most excellent (and not only highly recommended but highly required) article, “The Free Lunch is Over: A Fundamental Turn Toward Concurrency in Software”, appeared in the pages of Dr. Dobb’s Journal in March of 2005. (Herb’s website notes that “a much briefer version under the title “The Concurrency Revolution” appeared in C/C++ User’s Journal” the previous month.) And the panic itself wasn’t rooted in the idea that we weren’t going to be able to cope with rising demand, but that multi-core CPUs, back then a rarity and reserved only for hardware systems in highly-specialized roles, were in fact becoming commonplace in servers, and worse, as they migrated into desktops, they would quickly a fact of life that every developer would need to face. Herb demonstrated this by pointing out that CPU speeds had taken an interesting change of pace in early 2003:

Around the beginning of 2003, [looking at the website Figure 1 graph] you’ll note a disturbing sharp turn in the previous trend toward ever-faster CPU clock speeds. I’ve added lines to show the limit trends in maximum clock speed; instead of continuing on the previous path, as indicated by the thin dotted line, there is a sharp flattening. It has become harder and harder to exploit higher clock speeds due to not just one but several physical issues, notably heat (too much of it and too hard to dissipate), power consumption (too high), and current leakage problems.

Joe Armstrong, creator of Erlang, noted in a presentation at QCon London 2007 that another of those physical limitations was the speed of light—that for the first time, CPU signal couldn't get from one end of the chip to the other in a single clock cycle.

Quick: What’s the clock speed on the CPU(s) in your current workstation? Are you running at 10GHz? On Intel chips, we reached 2GHz a long time ago (August 2001), and according to CPU trends before 2003, now in early 2005 we should have the first 10GHz Pentium-family chips.

Just to (re-)emphasize the point, here, now, in early 2009, we should be seeing the first 20 or 40 GHz processors, and clearly we’re still plodding along in the 2 – 3 GHz range. The "Quake Rule" (when asked about perf problems, tell your boss you'll need eighteen months to get a 2X improvement, then bury yourselves in a closet for 18 months playing Quake until the next gen of Intel hardware comes out) no longer works.

For the near-term future, meaning for the next few years, the performance gains in new chips will be fueled by three main approaches, only one of which is the same as in the past. The near-term future performance growth drivers are:

  • hyperthreading
  • multicore
  • cache

Hyperthreading is about running two or more threads in parallel inside a single CPU. Hyperthreaded CPUs are already available today, and they do allow some instructions to run in parallel. A limiting factor, however, is that although a hyper-threaded CPU has some extra hardware including extra registers, it still has just one cache, one integer math unit, one FPU, and in general just one each of most basic CPU features. Hyperthreading is sometimes cited as offering a 5% to 15% performance boost for reasonably well-written multi-threaded applications, or even as much as 40% under ideal conditions for carefully written multi-threaded applications. That’s good, but it’s hardly double, and it doesn’t help single-threaded applications.

Multicore is about running two or more actual CPUs on one chip. Some chips, including Sparc and PowerPC, have multicore versions available already. The initial Intel and AMD designs, both due in 2005, vary in their level of integration but are functionally similar. AMD’s seems to have some initial performance design advantages, such as better integration of support functions on the same die, whereas Intel’s initial entry basically just glues together two Xeons on a single die. The performance gains should initially be about the same as having a true dual-CPU system (only the system will be cheaper because the motherboard doesn’t have to have two sockets and associated “glue” chippery), which means something less than double the speed even in the ideal case, and just like today it will boost reasonably well-written multi-threaded applications. Not single-threaded ones.

Finally, on-die cache sizes can be expected to continue to grow, at least in the near term. Of these three areas, only this one will broadly benefit most existing applications. The continuing growth in on-die cache sizes is an incredibly important and highly applicable benefit for many applications, simply because space is speed. Accessing main memory is expensive, and you really don’t want to touch RAM if you can help it. On today’s systems, a cache miss that goes out to main memory often costs 10 to 50 times as much getting the information from the cache; this, incidentally, continues to surprise people because we all think of memory as fast, and it is fast compared to disks and networks, but not compared to on-board cache which runs at faster speeds. If an application’s working set fits into cache, we’re golden, and if it doesn’t, we’re not. That is why increased cache sizes will save some existing applications and breathe life into them for a few more years without requiring significant redesign: As existing applications manipulate more and more data, and as they are incrementally updated to include more code for new features, performance-sensitive operations need to continue to fit into cache. As the Depression-era old-timers will be quick to remind you, “Cache is king.”

Herb’s article was a pretty serious wake-up call to programmers who hadn’t noticed the trend themselves. (Being one of those who hadn’t noticed, I remember reading his piece, looking at that graph, glancing at the open ad from Fry’s Electronics sitting on the dining room table next to me, and saying to myself, “Holy sh*t, he’s right!”.) Does that qualify it as a “mania”? Perhaps if you’re trying to pooh-pooh the concern, sure. But if you’re a developer who’s wondering where you’re going to get the processing power to address the ever-expanding list of features your users want, something Herb points out as a basic fact of life in the software development world ...

There’s an interesting phenomenon that’s known as “Andy giveth, and Bill taketh away.” No matter how fast processors get, software consistently finds new ways to eat up the extra speed. Make a CPU ten times as fast, and software will usually find ten times as much to do (or, in some cases, will feel at liberty to do it ten times less efficiently).

...  then eking out the best performance from an application is going to remain at the top of the priority list. Users are classic consumers: they will always want more and more for the same money as before. Ignore this truth of software (actually, of basic microeconomics) at your peril.

To get back to the editorial, we next come to ...

However, the fever was surprisingly short-lived. Intel's "largest open-source effort ever" to provide a standard tool for writing multi-threaded code, caused little more than a ripple of interest. Various books, rushed out while the temperature soared, advocated the urgent need for new "multi-core-friendly" programming models, involving such things as "software pipelines". Interesting as they undoubtedly are, they sit stolidly on bookshelves, unread.

Wow. Talk about your pretty aggressive accusation without any supporting evidence or citation whatsoever.

Intel's not big into the open-source space, so it doesn't take much for an open-source project from them to be their "largest open-source effort ever". (What, they're going to open-source the schematics for the Intel chipline? Who could read them even if they did? Who would offer up a patch? What good would it do?) The fact that Intel made the software available in the first place meant that they knew the hurdle that had yet to be overcome, and wanted to aid developers in overcoming it. They're members of the OpenMP group for the same reason.

Rogue Wave's software pipelines programming model is another case where real benefits have accrued, backed by case studies. (Disclaimer: I know this because I ghost-wrote an article for them on their Software Pipelines implementation.) Let's not knock something that's actually delivered value. Pipelines aren't going to be the solution to every problem, granted, but they're a useful way of structuring a design, one that's curiously similar to what I see in functional programming languages.

But simply defending Intel's generosity or the validity of an alternative programming model doesn't support the idea that concurrency is still a hot topic. No, for that, I need real evidence, something with actual concrete numbers and verifiable fact to it.

Thus, I point to Brian Goetz’s Java Concurrency in Practice, one of those “books, rushed out while the temperature soared”, which also turned out to be the best-selling book at Java One 2007, and the second-best-selling book (behind only Joshua Bloch’s unbelievably good Effective Java (2nd Ed) ) at Java One 2008. Clearly, yes, bestselling concurrency books are just a myth, alongside the magical device that will receive messages from all over the world and play them into your brain (by way of your ears) on demand, or the magical silver bird that can wing its way through the air with no visible means of support as it does so. Myths, clearly, all of them.

To continue...

The truth is that it's simply not a big issue for the majority of people. Writing truly "concurrent" applications in languages such as C# is difficult, as you get very little help from the language. It means getting involved with low-level concurrency primitives, such as lock statements and so on.

Many programmers lack the skills to do this, but more pertinently lack the need. Increasingly, programmers work in a web environment. As long as these web applications are deployed to a load-balanced web farm, then page requests can be handled in parallel so all available cores will be used efficiently without the need for the programmer to be concerned with fine-grained parallelism.

He’s right when he says you get very little help from the language, be it C# or Java or C++. And getting involved with low-level concurrency primitives is clearly not in anybody’s best interests, particularly if you’re not a concurrency guru like Brian. (And let’s be honest, even low-level concurrency gurus like Brian, or Joe Duffy, who wrote Concurrent Programming on Windows, or Mike Woodring, who co-authored Win32 Multithreaded Programming, have better things to do.) But to say that they “pertinently lack the need” is a rather impertinent statement. “As long as these web applications are deployed to a load-balanced web farm", which is very likely to continue to happen, “then page requests can be handled in parallel so all available cores will be used …”

Um... excuse me?

Didn’t you just say that programmers didn’t need to learn concurrency constructs? It would strike me that if their page requests are being handled in parallel that they have to learn how to write code that won’t break when it’s accessed in parallel or lead to data-corruption problems or race conditions when their pages are accessed in parallel. If parallelism is a fundamental part of the Web, don’t you think it’s important for them to learn how to write programs that can behave correctly in parallel?

Look for just a moment at the average web application: if data is stored in a per-user collection, and two simultaneous requests come in from a given user (perhaps because the page has AJAX requests being generated by the user on the page, or perhaps because there’s a frameset that’s generating requests for each sub-frame, or ...), what happens if the code is written to read a value from the session, increment it, and store it back? ASP.NET can save you here, a little, in that it used to establish a per-user lock on the entirety of the page request (I don’t know if it still does this—I really have lost any desire to build web apps ever again), but that essentially puts an artificial throttle on the scalability of your system, and makes the end-users’ experience that much slower. Load-balancer going to spray the request all over the farm? So long as the user session state is stored on every machine in the farm, that’ll work... But of course if you store the user’s state in the SQL instance behind each of those machines on the farm, then you take the performance hit of an extra network round-trip (at which point we’re back to concurrency in the database) ...

... all because the programmer couldn’t figure out how to make “lock” work? This is progress?

The Java Servlet specification specifically backed away from this "lock on every request" approach because of the performance implications. I heard a fair amount of wailing and gnashing during the early ASP.NET days over this. I heard the ASP.NET dev team say they made their decision because the average developer can't figure out concurrency correctly anyway.

And, by the way folks, this editorial completely ignores XML services. I guess "real" applications don't write services much, either.

The next part is even better:

Furthermore, the SQL Server engine behind these web applications is intrinsically "parallel", and can handle and use effectively about as many cores as you care to throw at it. SQL itself is a declarative rather than procedural language, so it is fundamentally concurrent.

True… and false. SQL is fundamentally “parallel” (largely because SQL is a non-strict functional language, not just a “declarative” one), but T-SQL isn’t. And how many developers actually know where the line is drawn between SQL and T-SQL? More importantly, though, how many effective applications can be written with a complete ignorance of the underlying locking model? Why do DBAs spend hours tuning the database’s physical constructs, establishing where isolation levels can be turned down, establishing where the scope of a transaction is too large, putting in indexed columns where necessary, and figuring out where page, row, or table locking will be most efficient? Because despite the view that a relational database presents, these queries are being executed in parallel, and if a developer wants to avoid writing an application that requires a new server for each and every new user added to the system, they need to learn how to maximize their use of the database’s parallelism. So even if the language is "fundamentally concurrent" and can thus be relied upon to do the right thing on behalf of the developer, the implementation isn't, and needs to be understood in order to be implemented efficiently.

He finishes:

For most programmers and for most web applications, however, the multi-core furore is a storm in a teacup; it's just not relevant. The web and database platforms already cope with concurrency requirements. We are already doing it.

This is one of those times I wish I had a time machine handy—I'd love to step forward five years, have a look around, then come back and report the findings. I'm tempted to close with the challenge to just let’s come back in five years and see what the programming language landscape and hardware landscape looks like. But that's too easy an "out", and frankly, doesn't do much to really instill confidence, in my opinion.

To ignore the developers building "rich" applications (be they being done in Flex/Flash, Cocoa/iPhone, WinForms, Swing, WPF, or what-have-you) is to also ignore a relatively large segment of the market. Not every application is being built on the web and is backed by a relational database—to simply brush those off and not even consider them as part of the editorial reveals a dangerous bias on the editor's part. And those applications aren't hosted in an "intrinsically 'parallel'" container that developers can just bury their head inside.

Like it or not, folks, the path forward isn't one that you get to choose. Intel, AMD, and other chip manufacturers have already made that clear. They're not going to abandon the multicore approach now, not when doing so would mean trying to wrestle with so many problems (including trying to change the speed of light) that simply aren't there when using a multicore foundation. That isn't up for debate anymore. Multicore has won for the forseeable future. And, as a result, multicore is going to be a fact of the developer's life for the forseeable future. Concurrency is thus also a fact of the developer's life for the forseeable future.

The web and database platforms “cope” with concurrency requirements by either making "one-size-fits-all" decisions that almost always end up being the wrong decision for high-scale systems (but I'm sure your new startup-based idea, like a system that allows people to push "micro-entries" of no more than 140 characters in length to a publicly-trackable feed would never actually take off and start carrying millions and millions of messages every day, right?), or by punting entirely and forcing developers to dig deeper beneath the covers to see the concurrency there. So if you're happy with your applications running no faster than 2GHz for the rest of the forseeable future, then sure, you don't need to worry about learning concurrency-friendly kinds of programming techniques. Bear in mind, by the way, that this essentially locks you in to small-scale, web-plus-database systems for the forseeable future, and clearly nothing with any sort of CPU intensiveness to it whatsoever. Be happy in your niche, and wave to the other COBOL programmers who made the same decision.

This is a leaky abstraction, full stop, end of story. Anyone who tells you otherwise is either trolling for hits, trying to sell you something, or striving to persuade developers that ignorance isn't such a bad place to be.

All you ignorant developers, this is the phrase you will be forced to learn before you start your next job: "Would you like fries with that?"


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Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:44:35 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Tuesday, March 24, 2009
From the Mailbag: Polyglot Programmer vs. Polyactivist Language

This crossed my Inbox:

I read your article entitled: The Polyglot Programmer. How about the thought that rather than becoming a polyglot-software engineer; pick a polyglot-language. For example, C# is borrowing techniques from functional and dynamic languages. Let the compiler designer worry about mixing features and software engineers worry about keep up with the mixture. Is this a good approach? [From Phil, at http://greensoftwareengineer.spaces.live.com/]

Phil, it’s an interesting thought you’ve raised—which is the better/easier approach to take, that of incorporating the language features we want into a single language, rather than needing to learn all those different languages (and their own unique syntaxes) in order to take advantage of those features we want?

After all, we’re starting to see this taking place within a certain number of languages already, particularly C#; first, in 3.0, they introduced a number of features in support of LINQ that make C# a useful starting point for working with a functional language. Extension methods, for example, allow us to add a number of different methods to the collection classes that provide some functional capabilities (Select<>, GroupBy<>, and so on), as Matt Podwysocki demonstrates, generics contribute the type-safety that most functional languages embrace, anonymous methods and delegates provide better functions-as-first-class-constructs (including lambdas), and anonymous types make it vastly easier to return and pass tuples. And now, in 4.0, we’re getting the “dynamic” keyword, which will add support for invoking methods and properties dynamically, in the grand tradition of most dynamic languages (like Python and Ruby), and 3.0’s local variable type inference allows us to write “var x = ...”, which feels pretty dynamic (even if it’s not, under the hood).

Unfortunately, I think for the most part, the answer’s going to be, “Yes, it would be nice, if it weren’t for the fact that there are very few languages that won’t collapse underneath their own weight if they did so.”

Consider, for example, the C# language. Already, with the C# 3.0 definition, the language specification weighs in at close to a thousand pages. The additional features in 4.0 could easily push it over a thousand and possibly, with all the places where “dynamic” behavior will need to be factored into the existing specification, could push that well into the 1200 to 1300 page range. What’s the upper limit on a language’s complexity to maintain and enhance, much less for its programmers to comprehend?

(By comparison, the C++ specification, as I can best remember, didn’t weigh in at more than a thousand pages, but given that the current working draft is under password protection, and I can’t find the prior spec as a freely-available download, I can’t see if memory is correct or not.)

Or, consider the various edge cases that came up around the introduction of nullable types in C# 2.0. What started out as a fairly simple suggestion—“let’s let T? represent the idea that this instance of T could be nullable, and at runtime it’ll be a Nullable<T> instance behind the scenes”—turned into a pretty ugly morass of edge cases at the language level that resulted in some serious bug-fixing right up until the final ship date.

Thing is, languages that aren’t written deliberately to allow their own modification and evolution tend to fail over time. C++ was one such example, and I think both Java and C# will stand as successor examples before long.

Right now, in C# 3.0, type inference is limited entirely to local variables because the language isn’t syntactically set up to leave out type names wherever possible—the “var” token is a type placeholder, largely because the parser has to have a type first. (This is the same purpose the “dynamic” keyword seems to be playing for 4.0, though I can’t say so for certain.) In F# and Scala, this syntax is deliberately written Pascal-style, with the name first, optionally followed by a colon and the type, because the parser can see the colon and realize the type is already specified, or see no colon and realize the type should be inferred. That syntax is used consistently throughout the F# and Scala languages, and that means it’s pretty easy, lexically speaking, for the languages to recognize when type inference should kick in.

What’s more, both F# and Scala don’t really support the O-O notion of method overloading, because again, it gets confusing when trying to kick in type inference—something about too many possibilities confusing the type-inferencer. (I’m not entirely positive of this point, by the way, it’s based on some conversations I’ve had with language designers over the last few years. I could be wrong, and would love to see a language that supports both.) Instead, they force developers to be more explicit about parameters being passed—F# won’t even do implicit widening conversions, in fact, such as automatically widening ints to longs.

But both F# and Scala have a very interesting facility to allow definitions of methods/functions using very flexible syntactic rules, such that they look like operators or keywords built into the language; F# defines its pipeline operator ( |> ) in its library definitions, for example. Scala defines numerous “keywords”, like synchronized or transient, as classes in the Scala package extending “StaticAnnotation”—in other words, their syntax and behavior is defined as an annotation, rather than as a built-in part of the language. Ditto for Scala’s XML support.

Lisp, of course, was one of the first (if not the first) language to do this, and it’s my understanding that this has been one of the principal reasons it has survived all these years as a language—because it’s an abstraction built on top of an abstraction built on top of an abstraction, et al, it makes it easier to change those underlying abstractions when the context changes.

This doesn’t mean those “polyactivist” languages like C# are bad things, it just means that there’s a danger that they’ll eventually collapse from too many moving parts all trying to talk to each other at the same time. As an exercise, open the C# 3.0 spec, and start checking off all the sections that will need to be touched by the introduction of the “dynamic” keyword as a new type.

Or, to put it analagously, yes, for a lot of work, a single multifunction tool can be useful, but for a lot of other work, you want tools that are specialized to the task at hand. Let’s not minimize the usefulness of that multifunction tool, but let’s not try to use a Swiss Army knife where a jeweler’s screwdriver is really needed.


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Tuesday, March 24, 2009 12:22:00 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
Comments [6]  | 
 Monday, March 23, 2009
SDWest, SDBestPractices, SDArch&Design: RIP, 1975 - 2009

This email crossed my Inbox last week while I was on the road:

Due to the current economic situation, TechWeb has made the difficult decision to discontinue the Software Development events, including SD West, SD Best Practices and Architecture & Design World. We are grateful for your support during SD's twenty-four year history and are disappointed to see the events end.

This really bums me out, because the SD shows were some of the best shows I’ve been to, particularly SD West, which always had a great cross-cutting collection of experts from all across the industry’s big technical areas: C++, Java, .NET, security, agile, and more. It was also where I got to meet and interview Bjarne Stroustrup, a personal hero of mine from back in my days as a C++ developer, where I got to hang out each year with Scott Meyers, another personal hero (and now a good friend) as well as editor on Effective Enterprise Java, and Mike Cohn, another good friend as well as a great guy to work for. It was where I first met Gary McGraw, in a rather embarrassing fashion—in the middle of his presentation on security, my cell phone went off with a klaxon alarm ring tone loud enough to be heard throughout the entire room, and as every head turned to look at me, he commented dryly, “That’s the buffer overrun alarm—somewhere in the world, a buffer overrun attack is taking place.”

On a positive note, however, the email goes on to say that “Cloud Connect [will] take over SD West's dates in March 2010 at the Santa Clara Convention Center”, which is good news, since it means (hopefully) that I’ll still get a chance to make my yearly pilgrimage to In-N-Out....

Rest in peace, SD. You will be missed.


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Monday, March 23, 2009 5:22:43 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Wednesday, February 18, 2009
Woo-hoo! Speaking at DSL DevCon 2009!

Just got this email from Chris Sells:

For twelve 45-minute slots at this year’s DSL DevCon (April 16-17 in Redmond, WA), we had 49 proposals. You have been selected as speakers for the following talks. Please confirm that you’ll be there for both days so that I can put together the schedule and post it on the conference site. This DevCon should rock. Thanks!

Martin Fowler - Keynote

Paul Vick + Gio - Mgrammar Deep Dive

Tom Rodgers - Domain Specific Languages for automated testing of equity order management systems and trading machines

Paul Cowan - DSLs in the Horn Package Manager

Guillaume Laforge - How to implement DSLs with Groovy

Markus Voelter - Eclipse tooling for Model-Driven stuff

Dionysios G. Synodinos - JavaScript DSLs for the Client Side

Ted Neward, Bradford Cross - Functional vs. Dynamic DSLs: The Smackdown

Gilad Bracha - embedding EBNF in a general purpose language

Umit Yalcinalp, Tilman Giese - RUMBA: RUby Managed Business data for Applications

Bob Archer - A DSL for Cool Effects in Adobe Pixel Blender

Chance Coble - Language Oriented Programming in F#

As my 15-year-old son Michael has grown fond of saying... w00t! The list of topics is fascinating, and I'm really looking forward to most, if not all, of them. Chance's talk on LOP in F# should be good, I'm really curious to see Gilad's discussion of EBNF (and wondering if this is Newspeak we'll be seeing), and Guillaume is always fun to watch when he's going on about Groovy. Of course, I'm also excited to be paired up with Brad, who's an insanely smart guy--I have a feeling I'll learn a lot just by standing next to him. (Sort of a speakers' osmosis.)

If you're not planning to be here for this (and the Lang.NET Symposium), either you have life-saving surgery scheduled that can't be pushed back, or you're clearly not interested in DSLs. For your own sake, I hope it's the latter. ;-)

Seriously, come for the full week. The Lang.NET Symposium last year was an amazing event, for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that it saw Sun celebrities John Rose, Charlie Nutter and Brian Goetz step on to the Microsoft campus, deliver a great presentation on the JVM, MLVM/invokedynamic, and JRuby, and get good feedback and discussion from Microsoft engineers and other notables. You don't get to see that every day. :-)


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Wednesday, February 18, 2009 4:29:25 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Friday, February 06, 2009
Nice little montage from JDD08

Last year I had the opportunity to return to the land of my roots, Poland, and speak at Java Developer Days (JDD). Just today, the organizers from JDD sent me a link with a nice little photo montage from the conference. (I did notice a few photos from the after-party were selectively left out of the montage, however, which is probably a good thing because that was the first time I'd ever met a Polish Mad Dog, and boy did they all go down easy...)

If you're anywhere in the area around Krakow in March, you definitely should swing by for their follow-up conference, 4Developers--it sounds like it's going to be another fun event, and this time it's going to reach out to more than just the Java folks, but also the .NET crowd (and a few others), as well.

(I don't really expect any of the readers of this blog living outside Poland to really pack up and head over to Krakow for a weekend, mind you, but if you're a technology speaker and you're interested in hanging with an extremely good group of people, the people who put these shows on--ProIdea--are top-notch, take great care of the speakers, and overall make the entire experience well worth the trip.)


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Friday, February 06, 2009 2:17:15 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Sunday, January 18, 2009
Seattle/Redmond/Bellevue Nerd Dinner

From Scott Hanselman's blog:

Are you in King County/Seattle/Redmond/Bellevue Washington and surrounding areas? Are you a huge nerd? Perhaps a geek? No? Maybe a dork, dweeb or wonk. Maybe you're in town for an SDR (Software Design Review) visiting BillG. Quite possibly you're just a normal person.

Regardless, why not join us for some Mall Food at the Crossroads Bellevue Mall Food Court on Monday, January 19th around 6:30pm?

...

NOTE: RSVP by leaving a comment here and show up on January 19th at 6:30pm! Feel free to bring friends, kids or family. Bring a Ruby or Java person!

Any of the SeaJUG want to attend? (Anybody know of a Ruby JUG in the Eastside area, by the way?) I'm game....


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Sunday, January 18, 2009 1:01:19 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Tuesday, January 13, 2009
DSLs: Ready for Prime-Time?

Chris Sells, an acquaintance (and perhaps friend, when he's not picking on me for my Java leanings) of mine from my DevelopMentor days, has a habit of putting on a "DevCon" whenever a technology seems to have reached a certain maturity level. He did it with XML a few years ago, and ATL before that, both of which were pretty amazing events, filled with the sharpest guys in the subject, gathered into a single room to share ideas and shoot each others' pet theories full of holes.

He's at it again, this time with DSLs; from the announcement on his blog:

Are you interested in presenting a 45-minute talk on some Domain Specific Language (DSL) related topic? It doesn't matter which platform or OS you're targeting. It also doesn't matter whether you're an author, a vendor, a professional speaker or a developer in the trenches (in fact, I tend to be biased toward the latter). We're after interesting and unique applications of DSL technology and if you're doing good work in that area, then I need you to send me a session topic and 2-4 sentence abstract along with a little bit about yourself.

I'll be taking submissions 'til February 9th, 2009, but don't delay. Passion and a burning story to tell count twice as much as anything else.

And don't be shy about spreading this announcement around! I've got good coverage in the .NET and Windows communities, but don't know very many folks in the Java or Unix or hardcore modeling worlds, so if you're in that world, let those guys know! Thanks.

The DSL DevCon itself will be in Redmond, WA on the Microsoft campus April 16-17, 2009, right after the Lang.NET conference. Lang.NET will be focused on general-purpose languages, whereas the DSL DevCon will focus on domain-specific languages. The idea is that if you want to attend one or the other or both, that's totally fine. We'll have 2.5 days of Lang.NET on April 14-16 and then 1.5 days of DSL DevCon content.

Oh, and the cost for both conferences is the same: $0.

We're only accepting 150 attendees to either conference. Every one of the five previous DevCons have sold out, so when we open registration, you'll want to be quick about getting your name on the list.

Submit your DSL-related talk idea!

For those of you who are deep in the Java or Ruby space, I really urge you to take a chance here and come to the event--just because it's being held on the Microsoft campus doesn't mean you're going to be forcibly plugged into the Matrix; the same goes for the Lang.NET event in the earlier part of the week, too. Don't believe me? I have proof: Brian Goetz, John Rose, and Charlie Nutter, Sun employees all, attended last years Lang.NET event, talked about the JVM and JRuby, and not only did they not have to give up their "sun.com" email addresses, but they came away with some new appreciations for the CLR, the ecosystem there, and even a few insights about their own platform in comparison to the JVM. (I won't say this as an absolute fact, but I think a lot of John's work on method handles for Java7 came out of conversations he'd had with some of the CLR guys that week.)

This is a DevCon, not a MarCon or a SaleCon. If you're a dev, you're welcome to come here. Frankly, I'd love to see the Java and Ruby (and LLVM and Parrot and ...) guys storm the castle, so to speak, if for no other reason than so Chris will stop teasing me about being a Java guy. ;-)


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Tuesday, January 13, 2009 10:33:42 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Sunday, January 04, 2009
"Pragmatic Architecture", in book form

For a couple of years now, I've been going around the world and giving a talk entitled "Pragmatic Architecture", talking both about what architecture is (and what architects really do), and ending the talk with my own "catalog" of architectural elements and ideas, in an attempt to take some of the mystery and "cloud" nature of architecture out of the discussion. If you've read Effective Enterprise Java, then you've read the first version of that discussion, where Pragmatic Architecture was a second-generation thought process.

Recently, the patterns & practices group at Microsoft went back and refined their Application Architecture Guide, and while there's a lot about it that I wish they'd done differently (less of a Microsoft-centric focus, for one), I think it's a great book for Microsoft-centric architects to pick up and have nearby. In a lot of ways, this is something similar to what I had in mind when I thought about the architectural catalog, though I'll admit that I'd prefer to go one level "deeper" and find more of the "atoms" that make up an architecture.

Nevertheless, I think this is a good PDF to pull down and put somewhere on your reference list.

Notes and caveats: Firstly, this is a book for solution architects; if you're the VP or CTO, don't bother with it, just hand it to somebody further on down the food chain. Secondly, if you're not an architect, this is not the book to pick up to learn how to be one. It's more in the way of a reference guide for existing architects. In fact, my vision is that an architect faced with a new project (that is, a new architecture to create) will think about the problem, sketch out a rough solution in his head, then look at the book to find both potential alternatives (to see if they fit better or worse than the one s/he has in her/his head), and potential consequences (to the one s/he has in her/his head). Thirdly, even if you're a Java or Ruby architect, most of the book is pretty technology-neutral. Just take a black Sharpie to the parts that have the Microsoft trademark around them, and you'll find it a pretty decent reference, too. Fourthly, in the spirit of full disclosure, the p&p guys brought me in for a day of discussion on the Guide, so I can't say that I'm completely unbiased, but I can honestly say that I didn't write any of it, just offered critique (in case that matters to any potential readers).


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Sunday, January 04, 2009 6:30:53 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Wednesday, December 31, 2008
2009 Predictions, 2008 Predictions Revisited

It's once again that time of year, and in keeping with my tradition, I'll revisit the 2008 predictions to see how close I came before I start waxing prophetic on the coming year. (I'm thinking that maybe the next year--2010's edition--I should actually take a shot at predicting the next decade, but I'm not sure if I'd remember to go back and revisit it in 2020 to see how I did. Anybody want to set a calendar reminder for Dec 31 2019 and remind me, complete with URL? ;-) )

Without further preamble, here's what I said for 2008:

  • THEN: General: The buzz around building custom languages will only continue to build. More and more tools are emerging to support the creation of custom programming languages, like Microsoft's Phoenix, Scala's parser combinators, the Microsoft DLR, SOOT, Javassist, JParsec/NParsec, and so on. Suddenly, the whole "write your own lexer and parser and AST from scratch" idea seems about as outmoded as the idea of building your own String class. Granted, there are cases where a from-hand scanner/lexer/parser/AST/etc is the Right Thing To Do, but there are times when building your own String class is the Right Thing To Do, too. Between the rich ecosystem of dynamic languages that could be ported to the JVM/CLR, and the interesting strides being made on both platforms (JVM and CLR) to make them more "dynamic-friendly" (such as being able to reify classes or access the call stack directly), the probability that your company will find a need that is best answered by building a custom language are only going to rise. NOW: The buzz has definitely continued to build, but buzz can only take us so far. There's been some scattershot use of custom languages in a few scattershot situations, but it's certainly not "taken the world by storm" in any meaningful way yet.
  • THEN: General: The hype surrounding "domain-specific languages" will peak in 2008, and start to generate a backlash. Let's be honest: when somebody looks you straight in the eye and suggests that "scattered, smothered and covered" is a domain-specific language, the term has lost all meaning. A lexicon unique to an industry is not a domain-specific language; it's a lexicon. Period. If you can incorporate said lexicon into your software, thus making it accessible to non-technical professionals, that's a good thing. But simply using the lexicon doesn't make it a domain-specific language. Or, alternatively, if you like, every single API designed for a particular purpose is itself a domain-specific language. This means that Spring configuration files are a DSL. Deployment descriptors are a DSL. The Java language is a DSL (since the domain is that of programmers familiar with the Java language). See how nonsensical this can get? Until somebody comes up with a workable definition of the term "domain" in "domain-specific language", it's a nonsensical term. The idea is a powerful one, mind you--creating something that's more "in tune" with what users understand and can use easily is a technique that's been proven for decades now. Anybody who's ever watched an accountant rip an entirely new set of predictions for the new fiscal outlook based entirely on a few seed numbers and a deeply-nested set of Excel macros knows this already. Whether you call them domain-specific languages or "little languages" or "user-centric languages" or "macro language" is really up to you. NOW: The backlash hasn't begun, but only because the DSL buzz hasn't materialized in much way yet--see previous note. It generally takes a year or two of deployments (and hard-earned experience) before a backlash begins, and we haven't hit that "deployments" stage yet in anything yet resembling "critical mass" yet. But the DSL/custom language buzz continues to grow, and the more the buzz grows, the more the backlash is likey.
  • THEN: General: Functional languages will begin to make their presence felt. Between Microsoft's productization plans for F# and the growing community of Scala programmers, not to mention the inherently functional concepts buried inside of LINQ and the concurrency-friendly capabilities of side-effect-free programming, the world is going to find itself working its way into functional thinking either directly or indirectly. And when programmers start to see the inherent capabilities inside of Scala (such as Actors) and/or F# (such as asynchronous workflows), they're going to embrace the strange new world of functional/object hybrid and never look back. NOW: Several books on F# and Scala (and even one or two on Haskell!) were published in 2008, and several more (including one of my own) are on the way. The functional buzz is building, and lots of disparate groups are each evaluating it (functional programming) independently.
  • THEN: General: MacOS is going to start posting some serious market share numbers, leading lots of analysts to predict that Microsoft Windows has peaked and is due to collapse sometime within the remainder of the decade. Mac's not only a wonderful OS, but it's some of the best hardware to run Vista on. That will lead not a few customers to buy Mac hardware, wipe the machine, and install Vista, as many of the uber-geeks in the Windows world are already doing. This will in turn lead Gartner (always on the lookout for an established trend they can "predict" on) to suggest that Mac is going to end up with 115% market share by 2012 (.8 probability), then sell you this wisdom for a mere price of $1.5 million (per copy). NOW: Can't speak to the Gartner report--I didn't have $1.5 million handy--but certainly the MacOS is growing in popularity. More on that later.
  • THEN: General: Ted will be hired by Gartner... if only to keep him from smacking them around so much. .0001 probability, with probability going up exponentially as my salary offer goes up exponentially. (Hey, I've got kids headed for college in a few years.) NOW: Well, Gartner appears to have lost my email address and phone number, but I'm sure they were planning to make me that offer.
  • THEN: General: MacOS is going to start creaking in a few places. The Mac OS is a wonderful OS, but it's got its own creaky parts, and the more users that come to Mac OS, the more that software packages are going to exploit some of those creaky parts, leading to some instability in the Mac OS. It won't be widespread, but for those who are interested in finding it, they're there. Assuming current trends (of customers adopting Mac OS) hold, the Mac OS 10.6 upgrade is going to be a very interesting process, indeed. NOW: Shhh. Don't tell anybody, but I've been seeing it starting to happen. Don't get me wrong, Apple still does a pretty good job with the OS, but the law of numbers has started to create some bad upgrade scenarios for some people.
  • THEN: General: Somebody is going to realize that iTunes is the world's biggest monopoly on music, and Apple will be forced to defend itself in the court of law, the court of public opinion, or both. Let's be frank: if this were Microsoft, offering music that can only be played on Microsoft music players, the world would be through the roof. All UI goodness to one side, the iPod represents just as much of a monopoly in the music player business as Internet Explorer did in the operating system business, and if the world doesn't start taking Apple to task over this, then "justice" is a word that only applies when losers in an industry want to drag down the market leader (which I firmly believe to be the case--nobody likes more than to pile on the successful guy). NOW: Nothing this year.
  • THEN: General: Somebody is going to realize that the iPhone's "nothing we didn't write will survive the next upgrade process" policy is nothing short of draconian. As my father, who gets it right every once in a while, says, "If I put a third-party stereo in my car, the dealer doesn't get to rip it out and replace it with one of their own (or nothing at all!) the next time I take it in for an oil change". Fact is, if I buy the phone, I own the phone, and I own what's on it. Unfortunately, this takes us squarely into the realm of DRM and IP ownership, and we all know how clear-cut that is... But once the general public starts to understand some of these issues--and I think the iPhone and iTunes may just be the vehicle that will teach them--look out, folks, because the backlash will be huge. As in, "Move over, Mr. Gates, you're about to be joined in infamy by your other buddy Steve...." NOW: Apple released iPhone 2.0, and with it, the iPhone SDK, so at least Apple has opened the dashboard to third-party stereos. But the deployment model (AppStore) is still a bit draconian, and Apple still jealously holds the reins over which apps can be deployed there and which ones can't, so maybe they haven't learned their lesson yet, after all....
  • THEN: Java: The OpenJDK in Mercurial will slowly start to see some external contributions. The whole point of Mercurial is to allow for deeper control over which changes you incorporate into your build tree, so once people figure out how to build the JDK and how to hack on it, the local modifications will start to seep across the Internet.... NOW: OpenJDK has started to collect contributions from external (to Sun) sources, but still in relatively small doses, it seems. None of the local modifications I envisioned creeping across the 'Net have begun, that I can see, so maybe it's still waiting to happen. Or maybe the OpenJDK is too complicated to really allow for that kind of customization, and it never will.
  • THEN: Java: SpringSource will soon be seen as a vendor like BEA or IBM or Sun. Perhaps with a bit better reputation to begin, but a vendor all the same. NOW: SpringSource's acquisition of G2One (the company behind Groovy just as SpringSource backs Spring) only reinforced this image, but it seems it's still something that some fail to realize or acknowledge due to Spring's open-source (?) nature. (I'm not a Spring expert by any means, but apparently Spring 3 was pulled back inside the SpringSource borders, leading some people to wonder what SpringSource is up to, and whether or not Spring will continue to be open source after all.)
  • THEN: .NET: Interest in OpenJDK will bootstrap similar interest in Rotor/SSCLI. After all, they're both VMs, with lots of interesting ideas and information about how the managed platforms work. NOW: Nope, hasn't really happened yet, that I can see. Not even the 2nd edition of the SSCLI book (by Joel Pobar and yours truly, yes that was a plug) seemed to foster the kind of attention or interest that I'd expected, or at least, not on the scale I'd thought might happen.
  • THEN: C++/Native: If you've not heard of LLVM before this, you will. It's a compiler and bytecode toolchain aimed at the native platforms, complete with JIT and GC. NOW: Apple sank a lot of investment into LLVM, including hosting an LLVM conference at the corporate headquarters.
  • THEN: Java: Somebody will create Yet Another Rails-Killer Web Framework. 'Nuff said. NOW: You know what? I honestly can't say whether this happened or not; I was completely not paying attention.
  • THEN: Native: Developers looking for a native programming language will discover D, and be happy. Considering D is from the same mind that was the core behind the Zortech C++ compiler suite, and that D has great native platform integration (building DLLs, calling into DLLs easily, and so on), not to mention automatic memory management (except for those areas where you want manual memory management), it's definitely worth looking into. www.digitalmars.com NOW: D had its own get-together as well, and appears to still be going strong, among the group of developers who still work on native apps (and aren't simply maintaining legacy C/C++ apps).

Now, for the 2009 predictions. The last set was a little verbose, so let me see if I can trim the list down a little and keep it short and sweet:

  • General: "Cloud" will become the next "ESB" or "SOA", in that it will be something that everybody will talk about, but few will understand and even fewer will do anything with. (Considering the widespread disparity in the definition of the term, this seems like a no-brainer.)
  • Java: Interest in Scala will continue to rise, as will the number of detractors who point out that Scala is too hard to learn.
  • .NET: Interest in F# will continue to rise, as will the number of detractors who point out that F# is too hard to learn. (Hey, the two really are cousins, and the fortunes of one will serve as a pretty good indication of the fortunes of the other, and both really seem to be on the same arc right now.)
  • General: Interest in all kinds of functional languages will continue to rise, and more than one person will take a hint from Bob "crazybob" Lee and liken functional programming to AOP, for good and for ill. People who took classes on Haskell in college will find themselves reaching for their old college textbooks again.
  • General: The iPhone is going to be hailed as "the enterprise development platform of the future", and companies will be rolling out apps to it. Look for Quicken iPhone edition, PowerPoint and/or Keynote iPhone edition, along with connectors to hook the iPhone up to a presentation device, and (I'll bet) a World of Warcraft iPhone client (legit or otherwise). iPhone is the new hotness in the mobile space, and people will flock to it madly.
  • .NET: Another Oslo CTP will come out, and it will bear only a superficial resemblance to the one that came out in October at PDC. Betting on Oslo right now is a fools' bet, not because of any inherent weakness in the technology, but just because it's way too early in the cycle to be thinking about for anything vaguely resembling production code.
  • .NET: The IronPython and IronRuby teams will find some serious versioning issues as they try to manage the DLR versioning story between themselves and the CLR as a whole. An initial hack will result, which will be codified into a standard practice when .NET 4.0 ships. Then the next release of IPy or IRb will have to try and slip around its restrictions in 2010/2011. By 2012, IPy and IRb will have to be shipping as part of Visual Studio just to put the releases back into lockstep with one another (and the rest of the .NET universe).
  • Java: The death of JSR-277 will spark an uprising among the two leading groups hoping to foist it off on the Java community--OSGi and Maven--while the rest of the Java world will breathe a huge sigh of relief and look to see what "modularity" means in Java 7. Some of the alpha geeks in Java will start using--if not building--JDK 7 builds just to get a heads-up on its impact, and be quietly surprised and, I dare say, perhaps even pleased.
  • Java: The invokedynamic JSR will leapfrog in importance to the top of the list.
  • Windows: Another Windows 7 CTP will come out, and it will spawn huge media interest that will eventually be remembered as Microsoft promises, that will eventually be remembered as Microsoft guarantees, that will eventually be remembered as Microsoft FUD and "promising much, delivering little". Microsoft ain't always at fault for the inflated expectations people have--sometimes, yes, perhaps even a lot of times, but not always.
  • Mac OS: Apple will begin to legally threaten the clone market again, except this time somebody's going to get the DOJ involved. (Yes, this is the iPhone/iTunes prediction from last year, carrying over. I still expect this to happen.)
  • Languages: Alpha-geek developers will start creating their own languages (even if they're obscure or bizarre ones like Shakespeare or Ook#) just to have that listed on their resume as the DSL/custom language buzz continues to build.
  • XML Services: Roy Fielding will officially disown most of the "REST"ful authors and software packages available. Nobody will care--or worse, somebody looking to make a name for themselves will proclaim that Roy "doesn't really understand REST". And they'll be right--Roy doesn't understand what they consider to be REST, and the fact that he created the term will be of no importance anymore. Being "REST"ful will equate to "I did it myself!", complete with expectations of a gold star and a lollipop.
  • Parrot: The Parrot guys will make at least one more minor point release. Nobody will notice or care, except for a few doggedly stubborn Perl hackers. They will find themselves having nightmares of previous lives carrying around OS/2 books and Amiga paraphernalia. Perl 6 will celebrate it's seventh... or is it eighth?... anniversary of being announced, and nobody will notice.
  • Agile: The debate around "Scrum Certification" will rise to a fever pitch as short-sighted money-tight companies start looking for reasons to cut costs and either buy into agile at a superficial level and watch it fail, or start looking to cut the agilists from their company in order to replace them with cheaper labor.
  • Flash: Adobe will continue to make Flex and AIR look more like C# and the CLR even as Microsoft tries to make Silverlight look more like Flash and AIR. Web designers will now get to experience the same fun that back-end web developers have enjoyed for near-on a decade, as shops begin to artificially partition themselves up as either "Flash" shops or "Silverlight" shops.
  • Personal: Gartner will still come knocking, looking to hire me for outrageous sums of money to do nothing but blog and wax prophetic.

Well, so much for brief or short. See you all again next year....


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Wednesday, December 31, 2008 11:54:29 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Wednesday, December 10, 2008
The Myth of Discovery

It amazes me how insular and inward-facing the software industry is. And how the "agile" movement is reaping the benefits of a very simple characteristic.

For example, consider Jeff Palermo's essay on "The Myth of Self-Organizing Teams". Now, nothing against Jeff, or his post, per se, but it amazes me how our industry believes that they are somehow inventing new concepts, such as, in this case the "self-organizing team". Team dynamics have been a subject of study for decades, and anyone with a background in psychology, business, or sales has probably already been through much of the material on it. The best teams are those that find their own sense of identity, that grow from within, but still accept some leadership from the outside--the classic example here being the championship sports team. Most often, that sense of identity is born of a string of successes, which is why teams without a winning tradition have such a hard time creating the esprit de corps that so often defines the difference between success and failure.

(Editor's note: Here's a free lesson to all of you out there who want to help your team grow its own sense of identity: give them a chance to win a few successes, and they'll start coming together pretty quickly. It's not always that easy, but it works more often than not.)

How many software development managers--much less technical leads or project managers--have actually gone and looked through the management aisle at the local bookstore?

Tom and Mary Poppendieck have been spending years now talking about "lean" software development, which itself (at a casual glance) seems to be a refinement of the concepts Toyota and other Japanese manufacturers were pursuing close to two decades ago. "Total quality management" was a concept introduced in those days, the idea that anyone on the production line was empowered to stop the line if they found something that wasn't right. (My father was one of those "lean" manufacturing advocates back in the 80's, in fact, and has some great stories he can tell to its successes, and failures.)

How many software development managers or project leads give their developers the chance to say, "No, it's not right yet, we can't ship", and back them on it? Wouldn't you, as a developer, feel far more involved in the project if you knew you had that power--and that responsibility?

Or consider the "agile" notion of customer involvement, the classic XP "On-Site Customer" principle. Sales people have known for years, even decades (if not centuries), that if you involve the customer in the process, they are much more likely to feel an ownership stake sooner than if they just take what's on the lot or the shelf. Skilled salespeople have done the "let's walk through what you might buy, if you were buying, of course" trick countless numbers of times, and ended up with a sale where the customer didn't even intend to buy.

How many software development managers or project leads have read a book on basic salesmanship? And yet, isn't that notion of extracting what the customer wants endemic to both software development and basic sales (of anything)?

What is it about the software industry that just collectively refuses to accept that there might be lots of interesting research on topics that aren't technical yet still something that we can use? Why do we feel so compelled to trumpet our own "innovations" to ourselves, when in fact, they've been long-known in dozens of other contexts? When will we wake up and realize that we can learn a lot more if we cross-train in other areas... like, for example, getting your MBA?


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Wednesday, December 10, 2008 7:48:45 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Monday, November 10, 2008
Explorations into "M"

Having freshly converted both the Visual Studio 2010 and Oslo SDK VPC images that we received at PDC 2008 last month to VMWare images, I figure it's time to dive into M.

At PDC, the Addison-Wesley folks were giving away copies of "The 'Oslo' Modeling Language" book, which is apparently official canon of the "M" language for Oslo, so I flip to page 1 and start reading:

The "Oslo" Modeling Language (M) is a modern, declarative language for working with data. M lets users write down how they want to structure and query their data using a convenient textual syntax that is convenient to both author and read.

M does not mandate how data is stored or accessed, nor does it mandate a specific implementation technology. Rather, M was designed to allow users to write down what they want from their data without having to specify how those desires are met against a given technology or platform. That stated, M in no way prohibits implementations from providing rich declarative or imperative support for controlling how M constructs are represented and executed in a given environment.

Hmm... I have to admit, all kinds of warning bells and alarm flags are going off in my head, and we're just two sentences into this thing. This sounds like something we've all done before; in fact, though I've not tried it, I have a feeling that if we were to go back through those two paragraphs and replace every instance of "M" with "SQL", we'd find a paragraph that could easily slip into the opening chapter of any introductory SQL or RDBMS book.

The goals of "separation of declaration from intent" have been around for that long, probably longer, and even the fiercest and staunchest defenders of SQL find themselves sometimes wandering through SQL declarations and code that clearly violate Chris Date's politely-worded commands around normal form and separation of declaration from intent and implementation.

I keep reading, though, and a few paragraphs later, find something intriguing.

Another important aspect of data management that M does not address is that of update. M is a functional language that does not have constructs for changing the contents of an extent. (Author's note: an "extent", defined a few paragraphs earlier, is that "an extent provides dynamic storage for values.") How data changes is outside the scope of the language. That said, M anticipates that the contents of an extent can change via external (to M) stimuli. Subsequent versions of M are expected to provide declarative constructs for updating data.

Wow. So the first question becomes, when are those "subsequent versions" expected? Is this simply a state of the PDC Preview bits, or something that's not in scope for v1 of the Oslo SDK?

I flip through the rest of the first chapter, which seems like a decent overview, and what I see there is an interesting type-declaration language; in many ways, it's highly reminiscent of XML Schema Descriptions (XSD) more than SQL declarations, but I suppose that's to be expected, at least for now. I'm sure they're going to cherry-pick a lot of the best data-declarative constructs from XSD, SQL, and any other metadata-based formats/languages, and that the semantics will change as they explore what works well and what doesn't. For now, though, "M" exists essentially as a data-descriptor language, and this is reinforced when I start playing with "m.exe", the "M compiler" (?).

First thing, I simply fire up "m.exe" to see what the options are. And... nothing. Huh? I wait for a bit, then Ctrl-C it, and start hunting through the documentation to see if I'm missing something here. I try a few different tests, like "m /?" or "m -help", and each time, the compiler just seems to wander off into the weeds, requiring a Ctrl-C to kill it.

What the heck? I know that these are PDC pre-alpha CTP "nothing is guaranteed to work" bits, but this seems a bit on the excessive side--I have every faith that Microsoft wouldn't hand these out if you can't even run the compiler! So acting on a hunch, I fire up "m /?" again, and tab away to look at something else. Sure enough, my hunch is rewarded--after a long pause, eventually the help screen comes up. So, apparently, the m.exe tool just takes fricken forever to run, is all.

Currently, the only targets M can compile to is their internal Repository for storing types, and a generic "T-SQL" target for any T-SQL-compliant database (which I presume for now means only SQL Server of various versions, but theoretically, I suppose, Sybase could work too, given those two systems' shared ancestry. And, given a pretty simple sample to work with, m.exe produces a pretty-easily-anticipated result; this:

module Ted
{
type Person
{
Id : Integer32 = AutoNumber();
Name : Text;
} where identity Id;
People : Person*;
}

turns into this:

set xact_abort on;
go

begin transaction;
go

set ansi_nulls on;
go

create schema [Ted];
go

create table [Ted].[People]
(
[Id] int not null identity,
[Name] nvarchar(max) not null,
constraint [PK_People] primary key clustered ([Id])
);
go

commit transaction;
go

... which, when you look at it, is pretty much what you'd want.

Interestingly enough, there's no reason why people in the Java or Ruby space couldn't use "M" just as easily, so long as the database targeted is one that M understands. (It also wouldn't be a terribly difficult exercise to build an M compiler in Java or Ruby, for that matter. Might be a fun off-time project, in fact.)

One thing that's also pretty clear is that M is very collection-centric, as the first chapter spends probably 50% of its time describing all the various ways that collections in M (written as "{a, b, c}") interact with one another (they can be compared for equality directly, for example, and have some neat projection/filter capabilities that were clearly drawn from the relational algebra and LINQ syntax). Having said that, though, one thing that is obviously missing is the traditional object "reference"-style connection, where A OWNS-A B.

What this seems to imply, then, is that the object/relational-mapping horrors of the past two decades aren't yet over. What's not clear is how M will make it easier (or if it will at all) to access those extents from the languages we traditionally use in the .NET space (C#, VB, C++/CLI, etc), specifically, what the mechanism for conducting a query will be like, and what it's return types will be when it cross the boundary back into C#.

If you're not sure what I mean by that, consider it this way: ADO.NET has a simple mechanism for taking the query--a raw string as a parameter--and executing it, and when it returns, it's handed back to your C# code as a DataSet, or else as an IDataReader for row-based/column-based firehose-style consumption. Much of the criticism of ADO.NET stems around two parts: the untyped nature of the query string, leading to potential typos and errors, and the relative awkwardness for extracting the data from the results, either the DataSet or the IDataReader, at least when compared to languages that have built-in set/tuple constructs.

The one sample that does show any sort of C# -> M kinds of interaction is in the MParserDemo sample, and here, when it queries the database, it does so using traditional ADO.NET API calls, so I'm not sure it's to be taken as a good indicator of the plans around M yet.

If all there was to Oslo was "M", I'd say it was an interesting little side-note at PDC, something that maybe a few folks might find interesting and otherwise not worth studying, but this is not the sum total of the Oslo bits; there is also Mg, the MGrammar language, a language specifically for building DSLs, and that's where my attention (and next blog post) is going next.


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Monday, November 10, 2008 7:34:51 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Thursday, November 06, 2008
REST != HTTP

Roy Fielding has weighed in on the recent "buzzwordiness" (hey, if Colbert can make up "truthiness", then I can make up "buzzwordiness") of calling everything a "REST API", a tactic that has become more en vogue of late as vendors discover that the general programming population is finding the WSDL-based XML services stack too complex to navigate successfully for all but the simplest of projects. Contrary to what many RESTafarians may be hoping, Roy doesn't gather all these wayward children to his breast and praise their anti-vendor/anti-corporate/anti-proprietary efforts, but instead, blasts them pretty seriously for mangling his term:

I am getting frustrated by the number of people calling any HTTP-based interface a REST API. Today’s example is the SocialSite REST API. That is RPC. It screams RPC. There is so much coupling on display that it should be given an X rating.

Ouch. "So much coupling on display that it should be given an X rating." I have to remember that phrase--that's a keeper. And I'm shocked that Roy even knows what an X rating is; he's such a mellow guy with such an innocent-looking face, I would've bet money he'd never run into one before. (Yes, people, that's a joke.)

What needs to be done to make the REST architectural style clear on the notion that hypertext is a constraint? In other words, if the engine of application state (and hence the API) is not being driven by hypertext, then it cannot be RESTful and cannot be a REST API. Period. Is there some broken manual somewhere that needs to be fixed?

Go Roy!

For those of you who've not read Roy's thesis, and are thinking that this is some kind of betrayal or trick, let's first of all point out that at no point is Roy saying that your nifty HTTP-based API is not useful or simple. He's simply saying that it isn't RESTful. That's a key differentiation. REST has a specific set of goals and constraints it was trying to meet, and as such prescribes a particular kind of architectural style to fit within those constraints. (Yes, REST is essentially an architectural pattern: a solution to a problem within a certain context that yields certain consequences.)

Assuming you haven't tuned me out completely already, allow me to elucidate. In Chapter 5 of Roy's thesis, Roy begins to build up the style that will ultimately be considered REST. I'm not going to quote each and every step here--that's what the hyperlink above is for--but simply call out certain parts. For example, in section 5.1.3, "Stateless", he suggests that this architectural style should be stateless in nature, and explains why; the emphasis/italics are mine:

We next add a constraint to the client-server interaction: communication must be stateless in nature, as in the client-stateless-server (CSS) style of Section 3.4.3 (Figure 5-3), such that each request from client to server must contain all of the information necessary to understand the request, and cannot take advantage of any stored context on the server. Session state is therefore kept entirely on the client.

This constraint induces the properties of visibility, reliability, and scalability. Visibility is improved because a monitoring system does not have to look beyond a single request datum in order to determine the full nature of the request. Reliability is improved because it eases the task of recovering from partial failures [133]. Scalability is improved because not having to store state between requests allows the server component to quickly free resources, and further simplifies implementation because the server doesn't have to manage resource usage across requests.

Like most architectural choices, the stateless constraint reflects a design trade-off. The disadvantage is that it may decrease network performance by increasing the repetitive data (per-interaction overhead) sent in a series of requests, since that data cannot be left on the server in a shared context. In addition, placing the application state on the client-side reduces the server's control over consistent application behavior, since the application becomes dependent on the correct implementation of semantics across multiple client versions.

In the HTTP case, the state is contained entirely in the document itself, the hypertext. This has a couple of implications for those of us building "distributed applications", such as the very real consideration that there's a lot of state we don't necessarily want to be sending back to the client, such as voluminous information (the user's e-commerce shopping cart contents) or sensitive information (the user's credentials or single-signon authentication/authorization token). This is a bitter pill to swallow for the application development world, because much of the applications we develop have some pretty hefty notions of server-based state management that we want or need to preserve, either for legacy support reasons, for legitimate concerns (network bandwidth or security), or just for ease-of-understanding. Fielding isn't apologetic about it, though--look at the third paragraph above. "[T]he stateless constraint reflects a design trade-off."

In other words, if you don't like it, fine, don't follow it, but understand that if you're not leaving all the application state on the client, you're not doing REST.

By the way, note that technically, HTTP is not tied to HTML, since the document sent back and forth could easily be a PDF document, too, particularly since PDF supports hyperlinks to other PDF documents. Nowhere in the thesis do we see the idea that it has to be HTML flying back and forth.

Roy's thesis continues on in the same vein; in section 5.1.4 he describes how "client-cache-stateless-server" provides some additional reliability and performance, but only if the data in the cache is consistent and not stale, which was fine for static documents, but not for dynamic content such as image maps. Extensions were necessary in order to accomodate the new ideas.

In section 5.1.5 ("Uniform Interface") we get to another stinging rebuke of REST as a generalized distributed application scheme; again, the emphasis is mine:

The central feature that distinguishes the REST architectural style from other network-based styles is its emphasis on a uniform interface between components (Figure 5-6). By applying the software engineering principle of generality to the component interface, the overall system architecture is simplified and the visibility of interactions is improved. Implementations are decoupled from the services they provide, which encourages independent evolvability. The trade-off, though, is that a uniform interface degrades efficiency, since information is transferred in a standardized form rather than one which is specific to an application's needs. The REST interface is designed to be efficient for large-grain hypermedia data transfer, optimizing for the common case of the Web, but resulting in an interface that is not optimal for other forms of architectural interaction.

In order to obtain a uniform interface, multiple architectural constraints are needed to guide the behavior of components. REST is defined by four interface constraints: identification of resources; manipulation of resources through representations; self-descriptive messages; and, hypermedia as the engine of application state. These constraints will be discussed in Section 5.2.

In other words, in order to be doing something that Fielding considers RESTful, you have to be using hypermedia (that is to say, hypertext documents of some form) as the core of your application state. It might seem like this implies that you have to be building a Web application in order to be considered building something RESTful, so therefore all Web apps are RESTful by nature, but pay close attention to the wording: hypermedia must be the core of your application state. The way most Web apps are built today, HTML is clearly not the core of the state, but merely a way to render it. This is the accidental consequence of treating Web applications and desktop client applications as just pale reflections of one another.

The next section, 5.1.6 ("Layered System") again builds on the notion of stateless-server architecture to provide additional flexibility and power:

In order to further improve behavior for Internet-scale requirements, we add layered system constraints (Figure 5-7). As described in Section 3.4.2, the layered system style allows an architecture to be composed of hierarchical layers by constraining component behavior such that each component cannot "see" beyond the immediate layer with which they are interacting. By restricting knowledge of the system to a single layer, we place a bound on the overall system complexity and promote substrate independence. Layers can be used to encapsulate legacy services and to protect new services from legacy clients, simplifying components by moving infrequently used functionality to a shared intermediary. Intermediaries can also be used to improve system scalability by enabling load balancing of services across multiple networks and processors.

The primary disadvantage of layered systems is that they add overhead and latency to the processing of data, reducing user-perceived performance [32]. For a network-based system that supports cache constraints, this can be offset by the benefits of shared caching at intermediaries. Placing shared caches at the boundaries of an organizational domain can result in significant performance benefits [136]. Such layers also allow security policies to be enforced on data crossing the organizational boundary, as is required by firewalls [79].

The combination of layered system and uniform interface constraints induces architectural properties similar to those of the uniform pipe-and-filter style (Section 3.2.2). Although REST interaction is two-way, the large-grain data flows of hypermedia interaction can each be processed like a data-flow network, with filter components selectively applied to the data stream in order to transform the content as it passes [26]. Within REST, intermediary components can actively transform the content of messages because the messages are self-descriptive and their semantics are visible to intermediaries.

The potential of layered systems (itself not something that people building RESTful approaches seem to think much about) is only realized if the entirety of the state being transferred is self-descriptive and visible to the intermediaries--in other words, intermediaries can only be helpful and/or non-performance-inhibitive if they have free reign to make decisions based on the state they see being transferred. If something isn't present in the state being transferred, usually because there is server-side state being maintained, then they have to be concerned about silently changing the semantics of what is happening in the interaction, and intermediaries--and layers as a whole--become a liability. (Which is probably why so few systems seem to do it.)

And if the notion of visible, transported state is not yet made clear in his dissertation, Fielding dissects the discussion even further in section 5.2.1, "Data Elements". It's too long to reprint here in its entirety, and frankly, reading the whole thing is necessary to see the point of hypermedia and its place in the whole system. (The same could be said of the entire chapter, in fact.) But it's pretty clear, once you read the dissertation, that hypermedia/hypertext is a core, critical piece to the whole REST construction. Clients are expected, in a RESTful system, to have no preconceived notions of structure or relationship between resources, and discover all of that through the state of the hypertext documents that are sent back to them. In the HTML case, that discovery occurs inside the human brain; in the SOA/services case, that discovery is much harder to define and describe. RDF and Semantic Web ideas may be of some help here, but JSON can't, and simple XML can't, unless the client has some preconceived notion of what the XML structure looks like, which violates Fielding's rules:

A REST API should be entered with no prior knowledge beyond the initial URI (bookmark) and set of standardized media types that are appropriate for the intended audience (i.e., expected to be understood by any client that might use the API). From that point on, all application state transitions must be driven by client selection of server-provided choices that are present in the received representations or implied by the user’s manipulation of those representations. The transitions may be determined (or limited by) the client’s knowledge of media types and resource communication mechanisms, both of which may be improved on-the-fly (e.g., code-on-demand). [Failure here implies that out-of-band information is driving interaction instead of hypertext.]

An interesting "fuzzy gray area" here is whether or not the client's knowledge of a variant or schematic structure of XML could be considered to be a "standardized media type", but I'm willing to bet that Fielding will argue against it on the grounds that your application's XML schema is not "standardized" (unless, of course, it is, through a national/international/industry standardization effort).

But in case you'd missed it, let me summarize the past twenty or so paragraphs: hypermedia is a core requirement to being RESTful. If you ain't slinging all of your application state back and forth in hypertext, you ain't REST. Period. Fielding said it, he defined it, and that settles it.

 

Before the hate mail comes a-flyin', let me reiterate one vitally important point: if you're not doing REST, it doesn't mean that your API sucks. Fielding may have his definition of what REST is, and the idealist in me wants to remain true to his definitions of it (after all, if we can't agree on a common set of definitions, a common lexicon, then we can't really make much progress as an industry), but...

... the pragmatist in me keeps saying, "so what"?

Look, at the end of the day, if your system wants to misuse HTTP, abuse HTML, and carnally violate the principles of loose coupling and resource representation that underlie REST, who cares? Do you get special bonus points from the Apache Foundation if you use HTTP in the way Fielding intended? Will Microsoft and Oracle and Sun and IBM offer you discounts on your next software purchases if you create a REST-faithful system? Will the partisan politics in Washington, or the tribal conflicts in the Middle East, or even the widely-misnamed "REST-vs-SOAP" debates come to an end if you only figure out a way to make hypermedia the core engine of your application state?

Yeah, I didn't think so, either.

Point is, REST is just an architectural style. It is nothing more than another entry alongside such things as client-server, n-tier, distributed objects, service-oriented, and embedded systems. REST is just a tool for thinking about how to build an application, and it's high time we kick it off the pedastal on which we've placed it and let it come back down to earth with the rest of us mortals. HTTP is useful, but not sufficient, so solve our problems. REST is as well.

And at the end of the day, when we put one tool from our tool belt "above all others", we end up building some truly horrendous crap.


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Thursday, November 06, 2008 9:34:23 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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Winter Travels: Øredev, DevTeach, DeVoxx

Recently, a blog reader asked me if I wasn't doing any speaking any more since I'd joined ThoughtWorks, and that's when I realized I'd been bad about updating my speaking calendar on the website. Sorry, all; no, ThoughtWorks didn't pull my conference visa or anything, I've just been bad about keeping it up to date. I'll fix that ASAP, but in the meantime, three events that I'll be at in the coming wintry months include:

Øredev 2008: 19 - 21 November, Malmoe, Sweden

Øredev will be a first for me, and I've ben invited to give a keynote there, along with a few technical sessions. I'm also told that .NET Rocks! will be on hand, and that they want to record a session, on whichever topic happens to cross the curious, crafty and cunning Carl, or the uh... the uh... sorry, Richard, there's just no good "R" adjectives I can use here. I mean, "rough" and "ready" don't exactly sound flattering in this context, right? Sorry, man.

In any event, I'm looking forward to this event, because it's a curious mix of technologies and ideas (agile, ALT.NET, Java, core .NET, languages, and so on), and because I've never been to Sweden before. One more European country, off my bucket list! :-)

(Yes, I had to cut-and-paste the Ø wherever I needed it. *grin*)

DevTeach 2008: 1 - 5 December, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

This has been one of my favorite shows since it began, way back in 2003, and a large part of that love has to do with the cast and crew of characters that I see there every year: Julie Lerman, Peter DeBetta, Carl and Richard (again!), Beth Massi, "Yag" Griver, Mario Cardinal and the rest of the Quebecois posse, Ayende, plus some new faces and friends, like Jessica Moss and James Kovacs. (Oh, and for the record, folks, for those of you who are still talking about it, the O/R-M smackdown of a year ago was staged. It was all fake. Ayende and I are really actually friends, we were paid a great deal of money by Carl and Richard to make it sound good, and in fact, we both agree that the only place anybody should really ever store their data is in an XML database.)

If you're near Montreal, and you're a .NET dev, you really owe it to yourself to check this show out.

Update: I just got this email from Jean-Rene, the guy who runs DevTeach:

Every attendees will get Visual Studio 2008 Pro, Expression Web 2 and Tech-Ed DEV set in their bag!

DevTeach believe that all developers need the right tool to be productive. This is what we will give you, free software, when you register to DevTeach or SQLTeach. Yes that right! We’re pleased to announce that we’re giving over a 1000$ of software when you register to DevTeach. You will find in your conference bag a version of Visual Studio 2008 Professional, ExpressionTM Web 2 and the Tech-Ed Conference DVD Set. Is this a good deal or what? DevTeach and SQLTeach are really the training you can’t get any other way.

Not bad. Not bad at all.

DeVoxx 2008: 8 - 12 December, Antwerp, Belgium

DeVoxx, the recently-renamed-formerly-named-JavaPolis conference, has brought me back to team up with Bill Venners to do a University session on Scala, and to record a few more of those Parlays videos that people can't seem to get enough of. Given that this show always seems to draw some of the Java world's best and brightest, I'm definitely looking forward to the chance to point the mike at somebody's grill and give 'em hell! Plus, I love Belgium, and I'm looking forward to getting back there. The fact that it's going to be the middle of winter is only a bonus, as... wait... Belgium, in the middle of winter? Whose bright idea was that?

(And finally, a show that Carl and Richard won't be at!)

 

Meanwhile, I promise to keep the "Upcoming Events" up to date for 2009. Seriously. I mean it. :-)


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Thursday, November 06, 2008 12:14:17 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Friday, October 31, 2008
Thoughts of a PDC (2008) Gone By...

PDC 2008 in LA is over now, and like most PDCs, it definitely didn't disappoint on the technical front--Microsoft tossed out a whole slew of new technologies, ideas, releases, and prototypes, all with the eye towards getting bits (in this case, a Western Digital 160 GB USB hard drive) out to the developer community and getting back feedback, either through the usual channels or, more recently, the blogosphere.

These are the things I think I think about this past PDC:

  • Windows 7 will be an interesting thing to watch--they handed out DVDs in both 32- and 64-bit versions, and it's somewhat reminiscent of the Longhorn DVDs of the last PDC. If you recall, Longhorn (what eventually became known as Vista) looked surprisingly good--if a bit unstable, something common to any release this early--for a while, then Vista itself pretty much fell flat. I think it will be interesting, as a social experiment, to look at what people say about Windows 7 now, compare it to what was said about Vista back in 2004 (which is I think when the last PDC was), and then compare what people say 1, 2 and 3 years after the PDC release.
  • Azure dominated a lot of the focus, commensurate with the growing interest/hype around "the cloud". All of this sounds suspiciously familiar to me, thinking back to the early days of SOAP/WSDL, and the intense pressure for Web services to revolutionize IT as we know it. This didn't happen, largely for technical reasons at first (incompatibilities between toolkits most of all), then because people treated it as CORBA++ or DCOM-with-angle-brackets. Azure and "cloud computing" have a different problem: clear definition of purpose. I think too many people have no idea what "the cloud" really is for this to be something to pay much attention to just yet.
  • Conference get-togethers and parties are becoming more and more lavish each year, as the various product teams challenge one another for the coveted title of The "Dude, were you there last night? It was amazing!" Party of PDC. For my money, that party was the party at the J Lounge on Wednesday night, complete with three floors of fun, including a wall-projected image of Rock Band, but--here's the rub--I couldn't tell you which team actually hosted the party. There was a Microsoft Dynamics CRM poster up in the middle of the gaming floor (bunch of XBox 360s, though not networked together, which I found disappointing), so I'm assuming it had something to do with them, but.... I think Microsoft product teams may want to consider saving some budget and instead of hiring six LA Lakers Cheerleaders to sit on a couch and allow drooling geeks to take pictures with them (no touching!), use the money to make the party--and the hosts--stick in my mind more effectively, or at least use it to hand out technical data on whatever it is they're building.
  • The vendor floor competition for attention is getting a little cutthroat. DevExpress stole the show this year, importing--no joke--an actor, "Mini-Me", Vern, to essentially echo (badly) anything Mark Miller (dressed, of course, as Austin Powers' arch-nemesis Dr. Evil) tried to say about the most recent version of CodeRush. Granted, Mark's new "do" (and the absurdly large head that was hiding underneath) makes it easy for him to do a good Dr. Evil impression, but other than that, there was really nothing parallel in the situation--despite Mark's insistence on writing code with evil Flying Spaghetti Monsters or what not in it. I think if you're a vendor and you want to make a splash at PDC, you think long and hard about an effective tie-in, like Infragistics' clever "I flew 1500 miles for this T-shirt" they were giving away.
  • The language world was a bit abuzz at the barely-concealed C# 4.0 features, mostly centering around the new "dynamic" keyword and the C# REPL loop capabilities, but noticeably absent was any similar kind of talk or buzz around VB 10. Even C++ got more attention than VB did, with a presentation clearly intending to call out a direct reference to Visual C++'s heyday, "Visual C++: Why 10 is the new 6". Conversations I had with a few Microsofties make it pretty clear that VB is now the red-headed stepchild of the .NET language family, and that fact is going to start making itself widely felt through the rest of the ecosystem before long, particularly now that rumors are beginning to circulate that pretty much all the "gifted kids" that were on the VB team have gone to find other places to exercise their intellect and innovation, such as the Oslo team. I think Microsoft is going to find itself in an uncomfortable position soon, of trying to kill VB off without appearing like they are trying to kill VB off, lest they create another "VB revolution" like the one in 2001 when unmanaged VB'ers ("Classic VBers"?) looked at VB.NET and collectively puked.
  • Speaking of collective revolution, anybody remember Visual FoxPro? Those guys are still kicking, and they were always a small fraction of the developer community, comparatively against VB, at least. I think Microsoft is in trouble here, of their own making, for not defining distinct and clearly differentiated roles for Visual Basic and C#.
  • The DLR is quickly moving into a position of high importance in my mind, and the fact that it now builds on top of expression trees (from C# 3.0/LINQ) and builds its trees in such a way that they look almost identical to what a corresponding C# or VB tree would look like means that the DLR is about a half-step away from becoming the most critical part of the .NET ecosystem, second only to the CLR itself. I think that while certain Microsoft releases, like Oslo, PowerShell, C# or VB, won't adopt the DLR as a core component to their implementation, developers looking to explore the DSL space will find the DLR a very happy place to be, particularly in combination with F# Parser Expression Grammars.
  • Speaking of F#, it's pretty clear that it was the developer darling--if not the media darling--of the show. The F# Hands-on-Lab looked to be one of the more popular ones used there, and every time I or my co-author, Amanda Laucher, talked with somebody who didn't already know we were working on F# in a Nutshell, they were asking questions about it and trying to understand its role in the world. I think the "cool kids" of the development community are going to come to check out F#, find that it can do a lot of what the O-O minded C# and VB can do, discover that the functional approach works well in certain scenarios, and start looking to use that on their new projects.
  • I think that if the Microsoft languages family were Weasley family from Harry Potter, C++ would be one of the two older brothers (probably Bill or Charlie, the cool older brothers who've gone on to make their name and don't need to impress anybody any more), Visual Basic would be Percy (desperate for validation and respect), C# would be Ron (cleary an up-and-comer in the world, even if he was a little awkward while growing up), and F# would be Ginny (the spunky one who clearly charts her own path despite her initial shyness, her accidental involvement in a Voldemortian scheme and her parents' and big brothers' interference in her life). Oslo, of course, is Professor Snape--we can't be sure if he's a good guy or a bad guy until the last book.
  • Continuing that analogy, by the way, I think Java is clearly Hermione: wickedly book smart, but sometimes too clever by half.

Overall, PDC was an amazing show, and there's clearly a lot of stuff to track. I personally plan to take a deep dive into Oslo, and will probably blog about what I find, but in the meantime, remember that all of the PDC bits that we got on the hard drives are available through the various DevCenters (or so I've been told), so have a look. There's a lot more there than just what I mentioned above.

Update: Lisa Feigenbaum emailed me with a correction: there was a session on VB 10 at PDC, and I simply missed it in the schedule. In fact, she was very subtle about it, simply asking me, "Did you make it to the VB talk?" and posted this URL along with it. Lisa, I stand corrected. :-) Having said that, though, I still stand by the other points of that piece: that the buzz I was hearing (which may very well have simply been the social circles I run in, I'll be the first to admit it, but I can only speak to my experience here and am very willing to be told I'm full of poopie on this one) was all C#, no VB, and that it bothers me that notable members of the VB team have departed for other parts of the company. Please, nothing would make me happier than to see VB stand as a full and equal partner in the .NET family of languages, but right now, it really still feels like the red-headed stepchild. Please, prove me wrong.


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Friday, October 31, 2008 6:01:06 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Monday, September 15, 2008
Apparently I'm #25 on the Top 100 Blogs for Development Managers

The full list is here. It's a pretty prestigious group--and I'm totally floored that I'm there next to some pretty big names.

In homage to Ms. Sally Fields, of so many years ago... "You like me, you really like me". Having somebody come up to me at a conference and tell me how much they like my blog is second on my list of "fun things to happen to me at a conference", right behind having somebody come up to me at a conference and tell me how much they like my blog, except for that one entry, where I said something totally ridiculous (and here's why) ....

What I find most fascinating about the list was the means by which it was constructed--the various calculations behind page rank, technorati rating, and so on. Very cool stuff.

Perhaps it's trite to say it, but it's still true: readers are what make writing blogs worthwhile. Thanks to all of you.


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Monday, September 15, 2008 4:29:19 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Wednesday, August 20, 2008
Rotor v2 book draft available

As Joel points out, we've made a draft of the SSCLI 2.0 Internals book available for download (via his blog). Rather than tell you all about the book, which Joel summarizes quite well, instead I thought I'd tell you about the process by which the book came to be.

Editor's note: if you have no interest in the process by which a book can get done, skip the rest of this blog entry.

One thing that readers will note that's different about this version of "the Rotor book" is that it's not being done through one of the traditional publishers. This is deliberate. As Joel and I talk about on the .NET Rocks! show we did together, the first Rotor book was on the first version of Rotor, which shipped shortly after the .NET 1.1 bits shipped to customers. That was back in the summer of 2001. Dave, Geoff and I shipped the book, I did a few conference talks on Rotor for the relatively few people who had an interest in what was going on "under the hood" of the CLR, and then we all sort of parted ways. (Dave retired from Microsoft entirely shortly thereafter, in order "to focus on the two things that matter in life: making music and making wine", as he put it.) Mission accomplished, we moved on.

Meanwhile, as we all knew would happen, the world moved on--Whidbey (.NET 2.0) shipped, and with it came a whole slew of CLR enhancements, most notably generics. Unlike how generics happened in the JVM, CLR generics are carried through all the way to the type system, and as a result, a lot of what we said in the first Rotor book was instantly rendered obsolete. Granted, one could always grab the Gyro patch for Rotor and see what generics would have looked like, but even that was pretty much rendered obsolete by the emergence of the SSCLI 2.0 drop, bringing the Rotor code up to date with the Whidbey production CLR release.

Except the book was, to be blunt about it, left behind.

Speaking honestly, the book never broke any sales records. Sure, for a while there it was the #1 best-selling book (in Redmond, WA, to my total shock and surprise) on Amazon, but we never had the kind of best-seller success that that of, say, Programming Ruby or pick-your-favorite-ASP.NET book. In the book publishing world, this was kind of the moral equivalent to watching your neighbors' slide show of their vacation: boring for most people not in the pictures, unless you were really interested in either the place they were visiting or what they did there. Most of our audience were either people working on the CLR itself (hence all the copies sold in Redmond, get it?), people who were researching on the CLR (such as the various Rotor research projects that came over a few years after its release), or people who just had that itch to "get wonky with it" and learn how some of the structures worked. Granted, a lot of what those people in the last category learned turned out to be pretty helpful in the Real World, but it was a payoff that came with a pretty non-trivial learning curve.

Fast-forward a few years, to the end of calendar year 2005.

By this point, .NET 2.0 has been out in production form for a bit, and Mark Lewin, then of Microsoft University Relations (I think that was his job, but to be honest my recollection on that point is kinda fuzzy) approached me: Microsoft was interested in seeing a second edition of the book out, to keep the Rotor community up to date with what was going on in the state of the art in the CLR. Was I interested? Sure, but the rules surrounding a multi-author book and subsequent editions are pretty clear: everybody has to be given right of first refusal. Thus a two-fold task was under way: find a co-author (preferably somebody from the CLR team, since my skills had never really been in navigating the Rotor source code in the first place, and I hadn't really spent a significant amount of time in the code since 2001), and get Geoff and Dave to indicate--in a very proper legal fashion--that they were passing on the second edition.

Ugh. Lawyers. Contracts. Bleah.

John Osborn then broke the bad news: OReilly wasn't interested in doing a second edition. I couldn't really blame them, since the first hadn't broken any kind of sales record, but I was a bit bummed because I thought this was the end of the road.

Mark Lewin to the rescue. Apparently his part of Microsoft really wanted this book out, to the point where they were willing to fund the effort, if I and my co-author were still interested. Sure, that sounded like a workable idea. And once the book was done, maybe we could publish it through MSPress, if that sounded like a good idea to me. Sure, that sounded good. Then Mark dropped the suggestion that maybe I could talk to Joel Pobar, former CLR geek extraordinaire, to see if he was interested. Joel had impressed me back when we'd briefly touched bases during the first book-writing experience, so yeah, sure, that sounded like a good idea. He was on board pretty quickly, and so we had the first step out of the way.

Next, we had to get OReilly to release their copyright on the first book, so we (and possibly MSPress) could work on and publish the second edition. This turned out to be a huge part of the time between then and now, not owing to any one party's deliberate attempt to derail the process, but just because copies of contracts had to be sent to the original three authors (myself, Stutz and Geoff) to sign over our rights with OReilly to a Creative Commons License, then copies had to be sent to everybody else so all the signatures could appear on one document, and so on.

Did I say it already? Ugh. Lawyers. Contracts. Bleah.

Then, we had to get a contract from Microsoft signed, and that meant more contracts flying back and forth across the fax lines, and then later the US (and Australian) postal system, and that was more delays as the same round of signatures had to be exchanged.

Just for the record: Ugh. Lawyers. Contracts. Bleah.

Finally, though, the die was cast, the authors were ready to go, and.... Hey, does anybody have the latest soft copy of the Word docs we used from the first edition? A quick email to John (Osborn) took longer than we thought, as OReilly tried to find the post-QA docs for us to work from. (I had my own copies, of course, but they were pre-QA, and thus not really what we wanted to start from.) More rounds of emails to try and track those down, so we can get started. Oh, and while we're at it, can we get the figures/graphics, too? They're not in the manuscript directly, so.... Oh, wait, does anybody know how to read .EPS files?

Then began the actual writing process, or, to be more precise, the revision process. We decided on a process similar to the way the first book had been written: Joel, being the "subject matter expert", would take a first pass on the text, and sketch in the rough outlines of what needed to be said. I would then take the prose, polish it up (which in many cases didn't require a whole lot of work, Joel being a great writer in his own right) and rearrange sections as necessary to make it flow more easily, as well as flesh out certain sections that didn't require a former position on the CLR team to write. Joel would then have a look at what I wrote, and assuming I didn't get it completely wrong, would sign off on it, and the chapter/section/paragraph/whatever was done.

And now we're in the process of doing that cosmetic cleanup that's part of the overtime period in book-writing, including generating the table of contents and index, since, it turns out, we'd rather publish it ourselves than through MSPress (which they're OK with). So, readers will have a choice: get the free download from Microsoft's website (once we're done, which should be "real soon now") and read it in soft-copy, or buy it off of Amazon in "treeware version", which will put a modest amount of money into Joel's and my collective pocket (once the relatively modest expenses of self-publishing are covered, that is).

This will be my first experience with self-publishing (as it is for Joel, too), so I'm eager to see how the whole things turns out. One thing I will warn the prospective self-publisher, though: do not underestimate the time you will spend doing those things the editorial/QA/copyedit pass normally handles for you, because it's kind of a pain in the *ss to do it yourself. Still, it's worth it, particularly if you're having a hard time selling your book to a publisher who, for reasons of economy of scale, don't want to publish a niche book (like this one).

Anyway, like many of my blog postings, this post has gone on long enough, so I'll sign off here with a "go read the draft", even if you're a Java or other execution engine/virtual machine kind of developer--seeing the nuts and bolts of a complex execution engine in action is a pretty cool exercise.

Oh, and if anybody's interested in doing a similar kind of effort around the OpenJDK (once it ships), let me know, 'cuz I'm a glutton for punishment....


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Wednesday, August 20, 2008 11:55:05 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Tuesday, August 19, 2008
An Announcement

For those of you who were at the Cinncinnati NFJS show, please continue on to the next blog entry in your reader--you've already heard this. For those of you who weren't, then allow me to make the announcement:

Hi. My name's Ted Neward, and I am now a ThoughtWorker.

After four months of discussions, interviews, more discussions and more interviews, I can finally say that ThoughtWorks and I have come to a meeting of the minds, and starting 3 September I will be a Principal Consultant at ThoughtWorks. My role there will be to consult, write, mentor, architect and speak on Java, .NET, XML Services (and maybe even a little Ruby), not to mention help ThoughtWorks' clients achieve IT success in other general ways.

Yep, I'm basically doing the same thing I've been doing for the last five years. Except now I'm doing it with a TW logo attached to my name.

By the way, ThoughtWorkers get to choose their own titles, and I'm curious to know what readers think my title should be. Send me your suggestions, and if one really strikes home, I'll use it and update this entry to reflect the choice. I have a few ideas, but I'm finding that other people can be vastly more creative than I, and I'd love to have a title that rivals Neal's "Meme Wrangler" in coolness.

Oh, and for those of you who were thinking this, "Seat Warmer" has already been taken, from what I understand.

Honestly, this is a connection that's been hovering at the forefront of my mind for several years. I like ThoughtWorks' focus on success, their willingness to explore new ideas (both methodologies and technologies), their commitment to the community, their corporate values, and their overall attitude of "work hard, play hard". There have definitely been people who came away from ThoughtWorks with a negative impression of the company, but they're the minority. Any company that encourages T-shirts and jeans, XBoxes in the office, and wants to promote good corporate values is a winner in my book. In short, ThoughtWorks is, in many ways, the consulting company that I would want to build, if I were going to build a consulting firm. I'm not a wild fan of the travel commitments, mind you, but I am definitely no stranger to travel, we've got some ideas about how I can stay at home a bit more, and frankly I've been champing at the bit to get injected into more agile and team projects, so it feels like a good tradeoff. Plus, I get to think about languages and platforms in a more competitive and hostile way--not that TW is a competitive and hostile place, mind you, but in that my new fellow ThoughtWorkers will not let stupid thoughts stand for long, and will quickly find the holes in my arguments even faster, thus making the arguments as a whole that much stronger... or shooting them down because they really are stupid. (Either outcome works pretty well for me.)

What does this mean to the rest of you? Not much change, really--I'm still logging lots of hours at conferences, I'm still writing (and blogging, when the muse strikes), and I'm still available for consulting/mentoring/speaking; the big difference is that now I come with a thousand-strong developers of proven capability at my back, not to mention two of the more profound and articulate speakers in the industry (in Neal and Martin) as peers. So if you've got some .NET, Java, or Ruby projects you're thinking about, and you want a team to come in and make it happen, you know how to reach me.


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Tuesday, August 19, 2008 11:24:39 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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 Thursday, August 14, 2008
The Never-Ending Debate of Specialist v. Generalist

Another DZone newsletter crosses my Inbox, and again I feel compelled to comment. Not so much in the uber-aggressive style of my previous attempt, since I find myself more on the fence on this one, but because I think it's a worthwhile debate and worth calling out.

The article in question is "5 Reasons Why You Don't Want A Jack-of-all-Trades Developer", by Rebecca Murphey. In it, she talks about the all-too-common want-ad description that appears on job sites and mailing lists:

I've spent the last couple of weeks trolling Craigslist and have been shocked at the number of ads I've found that seem to be looking for an entire engineering team rolled up into a single person. Descriptions like this aren't at all uncommon:

Candidates must have 5 years experience defining and developing data driven web sites and have solid experience with ASP.NET, HTML, XML, JavaScript, CSS, Flash, SQL, and optimizing graphics for web use. The candidate must also have project management skills and be able to balance multiple, dynamic, and sometimes conflicting priorities. This position is an integral part of executing our web strategy and must have excellent interpersonal and communication skills.

Her disdain for this practice is the focus of the rest of the article:

Now I don't know about you, but if I were building a house, I wouldn't want an architect doing the work of a carpenter, or the foundation guy doing the work of an electrician. But ads like the one above are suggesting that a single person can actually do all of these things, and the simple fact is that these are fundamentally different skills. The foundation guy may build a solid base, but put him in charge of wiring the house and the whole thing could, well, burn down. When it comes to staffing a web project or product, the principle isn't all that different -- nor is the consequence.

I'll admit, when I got to this point in the article, I was fully ready to start the argument right here and now--developers have to have a well-rounded collection of skills, since anecdotal evidence suggests that trying to go the route of programming specialization (along the lines of medical specialization) isn't going to work out, particularly given the shortage of programmers in the industry right now to begin with. But she goes on to make an interesting point:

The thing is, the more you know, the more you find out you don't know. A year ago I'd have told you I could write PHP/MySQL applications, and do the front-end too; now that I've seen what it means to be truly skilled at the back-end side of things, I realize the most accurate thing I can say is that I understand PHP applications and how they relate to my front-end development efforts. To say that I can write them myself is to diminish the good work that truly skilled PHP/MySQL developers are doing, just as I get a little bent when a back-end developer thinks they can do my job.

She really caught me eye (and interest) with that first statement, because it echoes something Bjarne Stroustrup told me almost 15 years ago, in an email reply sent back to me (in response to my rather audacious cold-contact email inquiry about the costs and benefits of writing a book): "The more you know, the more you know you don't know". What I think also caught my eye--and, I admit it, earned respect--was her admission that she maybe isn't as good at something as she thought she was before. This kind of reflective admission is a good thing (and missing far too much from our industry, IMHO), because it leads not only to better job placements for us as well as the companies that want to hire us, but also because the more honest we can be about our own skills, the more we can focus efforts on learning what needs to be learned in order to grow.

She then turns to her list of 5 reasons, phrased more as a list of suggestions to companies seeking to hire programming talent; my comments are in italics:

So to all of those companies who are writing ads seeking one magical person to fill all of their needs, I offer a few caveats before you post your next Craigslist ad:

1. If you're seeking a single person with all of these skills, make sure you have the technical expertise to determine whether a person's skills match their resume. Outsource a tech interview if you need to. Any developer can tell horror stories about inept predecessors, but when a front-end developer like myself can read PHP and think it's appalling, that tells me someone didn't do a very good job of vetting and got stuck with a programmer who couldn't deliver on his stated skills.

(T: I cannot stress this enough--the technical interview process practiced at most companies is a complete sham and travesty, and usually only succeeds in making sure the company doesn't hire a serial killer, would-be terrorist, or financially destitute freeway-underpass resident. I seriously think most companies should outsource the technical interview process entirely.)

2. A single source for all of these skills is a single point of failure on multiple fronts. Think long and hard about what it will mean to your project if the person you hire falls short in some aspect(s), and about the mistakes that will have to be cleaned up when you get around to hiring specialized people. I have spent countless days cleaning up after back-end developers who didn't understand the nuances and power of CSS, or the difference between a div, a paragraph, a list item, and a span. Really.

(T: I'm not as much concerned about the single point of failure argument here, to be honest. Developers will always have "edges" to what they know, and companies will constantly push developers to that edge for various reasons, most of which seem to be financial--"Why pay two people to do what one person can do?" is a really compelling argument to the CFO, particularly when measured against an unquantifiable, namely the quality of the project.)

3. Writing efficient SQL is different from efficiently producing web-optimized graphics. Administering a server is different from troubleshooting cross-browser issues. Trust me. All are integral to the performance and growth of your site, and so you're right to want them all -- just not from the same person. Expecting quality results in every area from the same person goes back to the foundation guy doing the wiring. You're playing with fire.

(T: True, but let's be honest about something here. It's not so much that the company wants to play with fire, or that the company has a manual entitled "Running a Dilbert Company" that says somewhere inside it, "Thou shouldst never hire more than one person to run the IT department", but that the company is dealing with limited budgets and headcount. If you only have room for one head under the budget, you want the maximum for that one head. And please don't tell me how wrong that practice of headcount really is--you're preaching to the choir on that one. The people you want to preach to are the Jack Welches of the world, who apparently aren't listening to us very much.)

4. Asking for a laundry list of skills may end up deterring the candidates who will be best able to fill your actual need. Be precise in your ad: about the position's title and description, about the level of skill you're expecting in the various areas, about what's nice to have and what's imperative. If you're looking to fill more than one position, write more than one ad; if you don't know exactly what you want, try harder to figure it out before you click the publish button.

(T: Asking people to think before publishing? Heresy! Truthfully, I don't think it's a question of not knowing what they want, it's more trying to find what they want. I've seen how some of these same job ads get generated, and it's usually because a programmer on the team has left, and they had some degree of skill in all of those areas. What the company wants, then, is somebody who can step into exactly what that individual was doing before they handed in their resignation, but ads like, "Candidate should look at Joe Smith's resume on Dice.com (http://...) and have exactly that same skill set. Being named Joe Smith a desirable 'plus', since then we won't have to have the sysadmins create a new login handle for you." won't attract much attention. Frankly, what I've found most companies want is to just not lose the programmer in the first place.)

5. If you really do think you want one person to do the task of an entire engineering team, prepare yourself to get someone who is OK at a bunch of things and not particularly good at any of them. Again: the more you know, the more you find out you don't know. I regularly team with a talented back-end developer who knows better than to try to do my job, and I know better than to try to do his. Anyone who represents themselves as being a master of front-to-back web development may very well have no idea just how much they don't know, and could end up imperiling your product or project -- front to back -- as a result.

(T: Or be prepared to pay a lot of money for somebody who is an expert at all of those things, or be prepared to spend a lot of time and money growing somebody into that role. Sometimes the exact right thing to do is have one person do it all, but usually it's cheaper to have a small team work together.)

(On a side note, I find it amusing that she seems to consider PHP a back-end skill, but I don't want to sound harsh doing so--that's just a matter of perspective, I suppose. (I can just imagine the guffaws from the mainframe guys when I talk about EJB, message-queue and Spring systems being "back-end", too.) To me, the whole "web" thing is front-end stuff, whether you're the one generating the HTML from your PHP or servlet/JSP or ASP.NET server-side engine, or you're the one generating the CSS and graphics images that are sent back to the browser by said server-side engine. If a user sees something I did, it's probably because something bad happened and they're looking at a stack trace on the screen.)

The thing I find interesting is that HR hiring practices and job-writing skills haven't gotten any better in the near-to-two-decades I've been in this industry. I can still remember a fresh-faced wet-behind-the-ears Stroustrup-2nd-Edition-toting job candidate named Neward looking at job placement listings and finding much the same kind of laundry list of skills, including those with the impossible number of years of experience. (In 1995, I saw an ad looking for somebody who had "10 years of C++ experience", and wondering, "Gosh, I guess they're looking to hire Stroustrup or Lippmann", since those two are the only people who could possibly have filled that requirement at the time. This was right before reading the ad that was looking for 5 years of Java experience, or the ad below it looking for 15 years of Delphi....)

Given that it doesn't seem likely that HR departments are going to "get a clue" any time soon, it leaves us with an interesting question: if you're a developer, and you're looking at these laundry lists of requirements, how do you respond?

Here's my own list of things for programmers/developers to consider over the next five to ten years:

  1. These "laundry list" ads are not going away any time soon. We can rant and rail about the stupidity of HR departments and hiring managers all we want, but the basic fact is, this is the way things are going to work for the forseeable future, it seems. Changing this would require a "sea change" across the industry, and sea change doesn't happen overnight, or even within the span of a few years. So, to me, the right question to ask isn't, "How do I change the industry to make it easier for me to find a job I can do?", but "How do I change what I do when looking for a job to better respond to what the industry is doing?"
  2. Exclusively focusing on a single area of technology is the Kiss of Death. If all you know is PHP, then your days are numbered. I mean no disrespect to the PHP developers of the world--in fact, were it not too ambiguous to say it, I would rephrase that as "If all you know is X, your days are numbered." There is no one technical skill that will be as much in demand in ten years as it is now. Technologies age. Industry evolves. Innovations come along that completely change the game and leave our predictions of a few years ago in the dust. Bill Gates (he of the "640K comment") has said, and I think he's spot on with this, "We routinely overestimate where we will be in five years, and vastly underestimate where we will be in ten." If you put all your eggs in the PHP basket, then when PHP gets phased out in favor of (insert new "hotness" here), you're screwed. Unless, of course, you want to wait until you're the last man standing, which seems to have paid off well for the few COBOL developers still alive.... but not so much for the Algol, Simula, or RPG folks....
  3. Assuming that you can stop learning is the Kiss of Death. Look, if you want to stop learning at some point and coast on what you know, be prepared to switch industries. This one, for the forseeable future, is one that's predicated on radical innovation and constant change. This means we have to accept that everything is in a constant state of flux--you can either rant and rave against it, or roll with it. This doesn't mean that you don't have to look back, though--anybody who's been in this industry for more than 10 years has seen how we keep reinventing the wheel, particularly now that the relationship between Ruby and Smalltalk has been put up on the big stage, so to speak. Do yourself a favor: learn stuff that's already "done", too, because it turns out there's a lot of lessons we can learn from those who came before us. "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" (George Santanyana). Case in point: if you're trying to get into XML services, spend some time learning CORBA and DCOM, and compare how they do things against WSDL and SOAP. What's similar? What's different? Do some Googling and see if you can find comparison articles between the two, and what XML services were supposed to "fix" from the previous two. You don't have to write a ton of CORBA or DCOM code to see those differences (though writing at least a little CORBA/DCOM code will probably help.)
  4. Find a collection of people smarter than you. Chad Fowler calls this "Being the worst player in any band you're in" (My Job Went to India (and All I Got Was This Lousy Book), Pragmatic Press). The more you surround yourself with smart people, the more of these kinds of things (tools, languages, etc) you will pick up merely by osmosis, and find yourself more attractive to those kind of "laundry list" job reqs. If nothing else, it speaks well to you as an employee/consultant if you can say, "I don't know the answer to that question, but I know people who do, and I can get them to help me".
  5. Learn to be at least self-sufficient in related, complementary technologies. We see laundry list ads in "clusters". Case in point: if the company is looking for somebody to work on their website, they're going to rattle off a list of five or so things they want he/she to know--HTML, CSS, XML, JavaScript and sometimes Flash (or maybe now Silverlight), in addition to whatever server-side technology they're using (ASP.NET, servlets, PHP, whatever). This is a pretty reasonable request, depending on the depth of each that they want you to know. Here's the thing: the company does not want the guy who says he knows ASP.NET (and nothing but ASP.NET), when asked to make a small HTML or CSS change, to turn to them and say, "I'm sorry, that's not in my job description. I only know ASP.NET. You'll have to get your HTML guy to make that change." You should at least be comfortable with the basic syntax of all of the above (again, with possible exception for Flash, which is the odd man out in that job ad that started this piece), so that you can at least make sure the site isn't going to break when you push your changes live. In the case of the ad above, learn the things that "surround" website development: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Flash, Java applets, HTTP (!!), TCP/IP, server operating systems, IIS or Apache or Tomcat or some other server engine (including the necessary admin skills to get them installed and up and running), XML (since it's so often used for configuration), and so on. These are all "complementary" skills to being an ASP.NET developer (or a servlet/JSP developer). If you're a C# or Java programmer, learn different programming languages, a la F# (.NET) or Scala (Java), IronRuby (.NET) or JRuby (Java), and so on. If you're a Ruby developer, learn either a JVM language or a CLR language, so you can "plug in" more easily to the large corporate enterprise when that call comes.
  6. Learn to "read" the ad at a higher level. It's often possible to "read between the lines" and get an idea of what they're looking for, even before talking to anybody at the company about the job. For example, I read the ad that started this piece, and the internal dialogue that went on went something like this:
    Candidates must have 5 years experience (No entry-level developers wanted, they want somebody who can get stuff done without having their hand held through the process) defining and developing data driven (they want somebody who's comfortable with SQL and databases) web sites (wait for it, the "web cluster" list is coming) and have solid experience with ASP.NET (OK, they're at least marginally a Microsoft shop, that means they probably also want some Windows Server and IIS experience), HTML, XML, JavaScript, CSS (the "web cluster", knew that was coming), Flash (OK, I wonder if this is because they're building rich internet/intranet apps already, or just flirting with the idea?), SQL (knew that was coming), and optimizing graphics for web use (OK, this is another wrinkle--this smells of "we don't want our graphics-heavy website to suck"). The candidate must also have project management skills (in other words, "You're on your own, sucka!"--you're not part of a project team) and be able to balance multiple, dynamic, and sometimes conflicting priorities (in other words, "You're own your own trying to balance between the CTO's demands and the CEO's demands, sucka!", since you're not part of a project team; this also probably means you're not moving into an existing project, but doing more maintenance work on an existing site). This position is an integral part of executing our web strategy (in other words, this project has public visibility and you can't let stupid errors show up on the website and make us all look bad) and must have excellent interpersonal and communication skills (what job doesn't need excellent interpersonal and communication skills?).
    See what I mean? They want an ASP.NET dev. My guess is that they're thinking a lot about Silverlight, since Silverlight's closest competitor is Flash, and so theoretically an ASP.NET-and-Flash dev would know how to use Silverlight well. Thus, I'm guessing that the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript don't need to be "Adept" level, nor even "Master" level, but "Journeyman" is probably necessary, and maybe you could get away with "Apprentice" at those levels, if you're working as part of a team. The SQL part will probably have to be "Journeyman" level, the XML could probably be just "Apprentice", since I'm guessing it's only necessary for the web.config files to control the ASP.NET configuration, and the "optimizing web graphics", push-come-to-shove, could probably be forgiven if you've had some experience at doing some performance tuning of a website.
  7. Be insightful. I know, every interview book ever written says you should "ask questions", but what they're really getting at is "Demonstrate that you've thought about this company and this position". Demonstrating insight about the position and the company and technology as a whole is a good way to prove that you're a neck above the other candidates, and will help keep the job once you've got it.
  8. Be honest about what you know. Let's be honest--we've all met developers who claimed they were "experts" in a particular tool or technology, and then painfully demonstrated how far from "expert" status they really were. Be honest about yourself: claim your skills on a simple four-point scale. "Apprentice" means "I read a book on it" or "I've looked at it", but "there's no way I could do it on my own without some serious help, and ideally with a Master looking over my shoulder". "Journeyman" means "I'm competent at it, I know the tools/technology"; or, put another way, "I can do 80% of what anybody can ask me to do, and I know how to find the other 20% when those situations arise". "Master" means "I not only claim that I can do what you ask me to do with it, I can optimize systems built with it, I can make it do things others wouldn't attempt, and I can help others learn it better". Masters are routinely paired with Apprentices as mentors or coaches, and should expect to have this as a major part of their responsibilities. (Ideally, anybody claiming "architect" in their title should be a Master at one or two of the core tools/technologies used in their system; or, put another way, architects should be very dubious about architecting with something they can't reasonably claim at least Journeyman status in.) "Adept", shortly put, means you are not only fully capable of pulling off anything a Master can do, but you routinely take the tool/technology way beyond what anybody else thinks possible, or you know the depth of the system so well that you can fix bugs just by thinking about them. With your eyes closed. While drinking a glass of water. Seriously, Adept status is not something to claim lightly--not only had you better know the guys who created the thing personally, but you should have offered up suggestions on how to make it better and had one or more of them accepted.
  9. Demonstrate that you have relevant skills beyond what they asked for. Look at the ad in question: they want an ASP.NET dev, so any familiarity with IIS, Windows Server, SQL Server, MSMQ, COM/DCOM/COM+, WCF/Web services, SharePoint, the CLR, IronPython, or IronRuby should be listed prominently on your resume, and brought up at least twice during your interview. These are (again) complementary technologies, and even if the company doesn't have a need for those things right now, it's probably because Joe didn't know any of those, and so they couldn't use them without sending Joe to a training class. If you bring it up during the interview, it can also show some insight on your part: "So, any questions for us?" "Yes, are you guys using Windows Server 2008, or 2003, for your back end?" "Um, we're using 2003, why do you ask?" "Oh, well, when I was working as an ASP.NET dev for my previous company, we moved up to 2008 because it had the Froobinger Enhancement, which let us...., and I was just curious if you guys had a similar need." Or something like that. Again, be entirely honest about what you know--if you helped the server upgrade by just putting the CDs into the drive and punching the power button, then say as much.
  10. Demonstrate that you can talk to project stakeholders and users. Communication is huge. The era of the one-developer team is long since over--you have to be able to meet with project champions, users, other developers, and so on. If you can't do that without somebody being offended at your lack of tact and subtlety (or your lack of personal hygiene), then don't expect to get hired too often.
  11. Demonstrate that you understand the company, its business model, and what would help it move forward. Developers who actually understand business are surprisingly and unfortunately rare. Be one of the rare ones, and you'll find companies highly reluctant to let you go.

Is this an exhaustive list? Hardly. Is this list guaranteed to keep you employed forever? Nope. But this seems to be working for a lot of the people I run into at conferences and client consulting gigs, so I humbly submit it for your consideration.

But in no way do I consider this conversation completely over, either--feel free to post your own suggestions, or tell me why I'm full of crap on any (or all) of these. :-)


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Thursday, August 14, 2008 3:38:42 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
Comments [4]  | 
 Friday, July 25, 2008
From the "Gosh, You Wanted Me to Quote You?" Department...

This comment deserves response:

First of all, if you're quoting my post, blocking out my name, and attacking me behind my back by calling me "our intrepid troll", you could have shown the decency of linking back to my original post. Here it is, for those interested in the real discussion:

http://www.agilesoftwaredevelopment.com/blog/jurgenappelo/professionalism-knowledge-first

Well, frankly, I didn't get your post from your blog, I got it from an email 'zine (as indicated by the comment "This crossed my Inbox..."), and I didn't really think that anybody would have any difficulty tracking down where it came from, at least in terms of the email blast that put it into my Inbox. Coupled with the fact that, quite honestly, I don't generally make a practice of using peoples' names without their permission (and my email to the author asking if I could quote the post with his name attached generated no response), so I blocked out the name. Having said that, I'm pleased to offer full credit as to its source.

Now, let's review some of your remarks:

"COBOL is (at least) twenty years old, so therefore any use of COBOL must clearly be as idiotic."

I never talked about COBOL, or any other programming language. I was talking about old practices that are nowadays considered harmful and seriously damaging. (Like practising waterfall project management, instead of agile project management.) I don't see how programming in COBOL could seriously damage a business. Why do you compare COBOL with lobotomies? I don't understand. I couldn't care less about programming languages. I care about management practices.

Frankly, the distinction isn't very clear in your post, and even more frankly, to draw a distinction here is a bit specious. "I didn't mean we should throw away the good stuff that's twenty years old, only the bad stuff!" doesn't seem much like a defense to me. There are cases where waterfall style development is exactly the right thing to do a more agile approach is exactly the wrong thing to do--the difference, as I'm fond of saying, lies entirely in the context of the problem. Analogously, there are cases where keeping an existing COBOL system up and running is the wrong thing to do, and replacing it with a new system is the right thing to do. It all depends on context, and for that reason, any dogmatic suggestion otherwise is flawed.

"How can a developer honestly claim to know "what it can be good for", without some kind of experience to back it?"

I'm talking about gaining knowledge from the experience of others. If I hear 10 experts advising the same best practice, then I still don't have any experience in that best practice. I only have knowledge about it. That's how you can apply your knowledge without your experience.

Leaving aside the notion that there is no such thing as best practices (another favorite rant of mine), what you're suggesting is that you, the individual, don't necessarily have to have experience in the topic but others have to, before we can put faith into it. That's a very different scenario than saying "We don't need no stinkin' experience", and is still vastly more dangerous than saying, "I have used this, it works." I (and lots of IT shops, I've found) will vastly prefer the latter to the former.

"Knowledge, apparently, isn't enough--experience still matters"

Yes, I never said experience doesn't matter. I only said it has no value when you don't have gained the appropriate knowledge (from other sources) on when to apply it, and when not.

You said it when you offered up the title, "Knowledge, not Experience".

"buried under all the ludicrous hyperbole, he has a point"

Thanks for agreeing with me.

You're welcome! :-) Seriously, I think I understand better what you were trying to say, and it's not the horrendously dangerous comments that I thought you were saying, so I will apologize here and now for believing you to be a wet-behind-the-ears/lets-let-technology-solve-all-our-problems/dangerous-to-the-extreme developer that I've run across far too often, particularly in startups. So, please, will you accept my apology?

"developers, like medical professionals, must ensure they are on top of their game and spend some time investing in themselves and their knowledge portfolio"

Exactly.

Exactly. :-)

"this doesn't mean that everything you learn is immediately applicable, or even appropriate, to the situation at hand"

I never said that. You're putting words into my mouth.

My only claim is that you need to KNOW both new and old practices and understand which ones are good and which ones can be seriously damaging. I simply don't trust people who are bragging about their experience. What if a manager tells me he's got 15 years of experience managing developers? If he's a micro-manager I still don't want him. Because micro-management is considered harmful these days. A manager should KNOW that.

Again, this was precisely the read I picked up out of the post, and my apologies for the misinterpretation. But I stand by the idea that this is one of those posts that could be read in a highly dangerous fashion, and used to promote evil, in the form of "Well, he runs a company, so therefore he must know what he's doing, and therefore having any kind of experience isn't really necessary to use something new, so... see, Mr. CEO boss-of-mine? We're safe! Now get out of my way and let me use Software Factories to build our next-generation mission-critical core-of-the-company software system, even though nobody's ever done it before."

To speak to your example for a second, for example: Frankly, there are situations where a micro-manager is a good thing. Young, inexperienced developers, for example, need more hand-holding and mentoring than older, more senior, more experienced developers do (speaking stereotypically, of course). And, quite honestly, the guy with 15 years managing developers is far more likely to know how to manage developers than the guy who's never managed developers before at all. The former is the safer bet; not a guarantee, certainly, but often the safer bet, and that's sometimes the best we can do in this industry.

"And we definitely shouldn't look at anything older than five years ago and equate it to lobotomies."

I never said that either. Why do you claim that I said this? I don't have a problem with old techniques. The daily standup meeting is a 80-year old best practice. It was already used by pilots in the second world war. How could I be against that? It's fine as it is.

Um... because you used the term "lobotomies" first? And because your title pretty clearly implies the statement, perhaps? (And let's lose the term "best practice" entirely, please? There is no such thing--not even the daily standup.)

It's ok you didn't like my article. Sure it's meant to be provocative, and food for thought. The article got twice as many positive votes than negative votes from DZone readers. So I guess I'm adding value. But by taking the discussion away from its original context (both physically and conceptually), and calling me names, you're not adding any value for anyone.

I took it in exactly the context it was given--a DZone email blast. I can't help it if it was taken out of context, because that's how it was handed to me. What's worse, I can see a development team citing this as an "expert opinion" to their management as a justification to try untested approaches or technologies, or as inspiration to a young developer, who reads "knowledge, not experience", and thinks, "Wow, if I know all the cutting-edge latest stuff, I don't need to have those 10 years of experience to get that job as a senior application architect." If your article was aimed more clearly at the development process side of things, then I would wish it had appeared more clearly in the arena of development processes, and made it more clear that your aim was to suggest that managers (who aren't real big on reading blogs anyway, I've sadly found) should be a bit more pragmatic and open-minded about who they hire.

Look, I understand the desire for a provocative title--for me, the author of "The Vietnam of Computer Science", to cast stones at another author for choosing an eye-catching title is so far beyond hypocrisy as to move into sheer wild-eyed audacity. But I have seen, first-hand, how that article has been used to justify the most incredibly asinine technology decisions, and it moves me now to say "Be careful what you wish for" when choosing titles that meant to be provocative and food for thought. Sure, your piece got more positive votes than negative ones. So too, in their day, did articles on client-server, on CORBA, on Six-Sigma, on the necessity for big up-front design....

 

Let me put it to you this way. Assume your child or your wife is sick, and as you reach the hospital, the admittance nurse offers you a choice of the two doctors on call. Who do you want more: the doctor who just graduated fresh from medical school and knows all the latest in holistic and unconventional medicine, or the doctor with 30 years' experience and a solid track record of healthy patients?


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Friday, July 25, 2008 12:03:40 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
Comments [9]  | 
 Thursday, July 24, 2008
From the "You Must Be Trolling for Hits" Department...

Recently this little gem crossed my Inbox....

Professionalism = Knowledge First, Experience Last
By J----- A-----


Do you trust a doctor with diagnosing your mental problems if the doctor tells you he's got 20 years of experience? Do you still trust that doctor when he picks up his tools, and asks you to prepare for a lobotomy?

Would you still be impressed if the doctor had 20 years of experience in carrying out lobotomies?

I am always skeptic when people tell me they have X years of experience in a certain field or discipline, like "5 years of experience as a .NET developer", "8 years of experience as a project manager" or "12 years of experience as a development manager". It is as if people's professional levels need to be measured in years of practice.

This, of course, is nonsense.

Professionalism is measured by what you are going to do now...

Are you going to use some discredited technique from half a century ago?
•    Are you, as a .NET developer, going to use Response.Write, because you've got 5 years of experience doing exactly that?
•    Are you, as a project manager, going to create Gantt charts, because that's what you've been doing for 8 years?
•    Are you, as a development manager, going to micro-manage your team members, as you did in the 12 years before now?

If so, allow me to illustrate the value of your experience...

(Photo of "Zero" signs)

Here's an example of what it means to be a professional:

There's a concept called Kanban making headlines these days in some parts of the agile community. I honestly and proudly admit that I have no experience at all in applying Kanban. But that's just a minor inconvenience. Because I have attained the knowledge of what it is and what it can be good for. And now there are some planning issues in our organization for which this Kanban-stuff might be the perfect solution. I'm sure we're going to give it a shot, in a controlled setting, with time allocated for a pilot and proper evaluations afterwards. That's the way a professional tries to solve a problem.

Professionals don't match problems with their experiences. They match them with their knowledge.

Sure, experience is useful. But only when you already have the knowledge in place. Experience has no value when there's no knowledge to verify that you are applying the right experience.

Knowledge Comes First, Experience Comes Last

This is my message to anyone who wants to be a professional software developer, a professional project manager, or a professional development manager.

You must gain and apply knowledge first, and experience will help you after that. Professionals need to know about the latest developments and techniques.

They certainly don't bother measuring years of experience.

Are you still practicing lobotomies?

Um....

Wow.

Let's start with the logical fallacy in the first section. Do I trust a doctor with diagnosing my mental problems if he tells me he's got 20 years of experience? Generally, yes, unless I have reasons to doubt this. If the guy picks up a skull-drill and starts looking for a place to start boring into my skull, sure, I'll start to question his judgement.... But what does this have to do with anything? I wouldn't trust the guy if he picked up a chainsaw and started firing it up, either.

Look, I get the analogy: "Doctor has 20 years of experience using outdated skills", har har. Very funny, very memorable, and totally inappropriate metaphor for the situation. To stand here and suggest that developers who aren't using the latest-and-greatest, so-bleeding-edge-even-saying-the-name-cuts-your-skin tools or languages or technologies are somehow practicing lobotomies (which, by the way, are still a recommended practice in certain mental disorder cases, I understand) in order to solve any and all mental-health issues, is a gross mischaracterization--and the worst form of negligence--I've ever heard suggested.

And it comes as no surprise that it's coming from the CIO of a consulting company. (Note to self: here's one more company I don't want anywhere near my clients' IT infrastructure.)

Let's take this analogy to its logical next step, shall we?

COBOL is (at least) twenty years old, so therefore any use of COBOL must clearly be as idiotic as drilling holes in your skull to let the demons out. So any company currently using COBOL has no real option other than to immediately upgrade all of their currently-running COBOL infrastructure (despite the fact that it's tested, works, and cashes most of the US banking industry's checks on a daily basis) with something vastly superior and totally untested (since we don't need experience, just knowlege), like... oh, I dunno.... how about Ruby? Oh, no, wait, that's at least 10 years old. Ditto for Java. And let's not even think about C, Perl, Python....

I know; let's rewrite the entire financial industry's core backbone in Groovy, since it's only, what, 6 years old at this point? I mean, sure, we'll have to do all this over again in just four years, since that's when Groovy will turn 10 and thus obviously begin it's long slide into mediocrity, alongside the "four humors" of medicine and Aristotle's (completely inaccurate) anatomical depictions, but hey, that's progress, right? Forget experience, it has no value compared to the "knowledge" that comes from reading the documentation on a brand-new language, tool, library, or platform....

What I find most appalling is this part right here:

I honestly and proudly admit that I have no experience at all in applying Kanban. But that's just a minor inconvenience. Because I have attained the knowledge of what it is and what it can be good for.

How can a developer honestly claim to know "what it can be good for", without some kind of experience to back it? (Hell, I'll even accept that you have familiarity and experience with something vaguely relating to the thing at hand, if you've got it--after all, experience in Java makes you a pretty damn good C# developer, in my mind, and vice versa.)

And, to make things even more interesting, our intrepid troll, having established the attention-gathering headline, then proceeds to step away from the chasm, by backing away from this "knowledge-not-experience" position in the same paragraph, just one sentence later:

I'm sure we're going to give it a shot, in a controlled setting, with time allocated for a pilot and proper evaluations afterwards.

Ah... In other words, he and his company are going to experiment with this new technique, "in a controlled setting, with time allocated for a pilot and proper evaluations afterwards", in order to gain experience with the technique and see how it works and how it doesn't.

In other words....

.... experience matters.

Knowledge, apparently, isn't enough--experience still matters, and it matters a lot earlier than his "knowledge first, experience last" mantra seems to imply. Otherwise, once you "know" something, why not apply it immediately to your mission-critical core?

At the end of the day, buried under all the ludicrous hyperbole, he has a point: developers, like medical professionals, must ensure they are on top of their game and spend some time investing in themselves and their knowledge portfolio. Jay Zimmerman takes great pains to point this out at every No Fluff Just Stuff show, and he's right: those who spend the time to invest in their own knowledge portfolio, find themselves the last to be fired and the first to be hired. But this doesn't mean that everything you learn is immediately applicable, or even appropriate, to the situation at hand. Just because you learned Groovy last weekend in Austin doesn't mean you have the right--or the responsibility--to immediately start slipping Groovy in to the production servers. Groovy has its share of good things, yes, but it's got its share of negative consequences, too, and you'd better damn well know what they are before you start betting the company's future on it. (No, I will not tell you what those negative consequences are--that's your job, because what if it turns out I'm wrong, or they don't apply to your particular situation?) Every technology, language, library or tool has a positive/negative profile to it, and if you can't point out the pros as well as the cons, then you don't understand the technology and you have no business using it on anything except maybe a prototype that never leaves your local hard disk. Too many projects were built with "flavor-of-the-year" tools and technologies, and a few years later, long after the original "bleeding-edge" developer has gone on to do a new project with a new "bleeding-edge" technology, the IT guys left to admin and upkeep the project are struggling to find ways to keep this thing afloat.

If you're languishing at a company that seems to resist anything and everything new, try this exercise on: go down to the IT guys, and ask them why they resist. Ask them to show you a data flow diagram of how information feeds from one system to another (assuming they even have one). Ask them how many different operating systems they have, how many different languages were used to create the various software programs currently running, what tools they have to know when one of those programs fails, and how many different data formats are currently in use. Then go find the guys currently maintaining and updating and bug-fixing those current programs, and ask to see the code. Figure out how long it would take you to rewrite the whole thing, and keep the company in business while you're at it.

There is a reason "legacy code" exists, and while we shouldn't be afraid to replace it, we shouldn't be cavalier about tossing it out, either.

And we definitely shouldn't look at anything older than five years ago and equate it to lobotomies. COBOL had some good ideas that still echo through the industry today, and Groovy and Scala and Ruby and F# undoubtedly have some buried mines that we will, with benefit of ten years' hindsight, look back at in 2018 and say, "Wow, how dumb were we to think that this was the last language we'd ever have to use!".

That's experience talking.

And the funny thing is, it seems to have served us pretty well. When we don't listen to the guys claiming to know how to use something effectively that they've never actually used before, of course.

Caveat emptor.


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Thursday, July 24, 2008 12:53:02 AM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
Comments [9]  | 
 Wednesday, July 16, 2008
Blog change? Ads? What gives?

If you've peeked at my blog site in the last twenty minutes or so, you've probably noticed some churn in the template in the upper-left corner; by now, it's been finalized, and it reads "JOB REFERRALS".

WTHeck? Has Ted finally sold out? Sort of, not really. At least, I don't think so.

Here's the deal: the company behind those ads, Entice Labs, contacted me to see if I was interested in hosting some job ads on my blog, given that I seem to generate a moderate amount of traffic. I figured it was worthwhile to at least talk to them, and the more I did, the more I liked what I heard--the ads are focused specifically at developers of particular types (I chose a criteria string of "Software Developers", subcategorized by "Java, .NET, .NET (Visual Basic), .NET (C#), C++, Flex, Ruby on Rails, C, SQL, JavaScript, HTML" though I'm not sure whether "HTML" will bring in too many web-designer jobs), and visitors to my blog don't have to click through the ads to get to the content, which was important to me. And, besides, given the current economic climate, if I can help somebody find a new job, I'd like to.

Now for the full disclaimer: I will be getting money back from these job ads, though how much, to be honest with you, I'm not sure. I'm really not doing this for the money, so I make this statement now: I will take 50% of whatever I make through this program and donate it to a charitable organization. The other 50% I will use to offset travel and expenses to user groups and/or CodeCamps and/or for-free conferences put on throughout the country. (Email me if you know of one that you're organizing or attending and would like to see me speak at, and I'll tell you if there's any room in the budget left for it. :-) )

Anyway, I figured if the ads got too obnoxious, I could always remove them; it's an experiment of sorts. Tell me what you think.


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Wednesday, July 16, 2008 7:29:46 PM (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
Comments [4]  | 
 Wednesday, July 02, 2008
Polyglot Plurality

The Pragmatic Programmer says, "Learn a new language every year". This is great advice, not just because it puts new tools into your mental toolbox that you can pull out on various occasions to get a job done, but also because it opens your mind to new ideas and new concepts that will filter their way into your code even without explicit language support. For example, suppose you've looked at (J/Iron)Ruby or Groovy, and come to like the "internal iterator" approach as a way of simplifying moving across a collection of objects in a uniform way; for political and cultural reasons, though, you can't write code in anything but Java. You're frustrated, because local anonymous functions (also commonly--and, I think, mistakenly--called closures) are not a first-class concept in Java. Then, you later look at Haskell/ML/Scala/F#, which makes heavy use of what Java programmers would call "static methods" to carry out operations, and realize that this could, in fact, be adapted to Java to give you the "internal iteration" concept over the Java Collections:

   1: package com.tedneward.util;
   2:  
   3: import java.util.*;
   4:  
   5: public interface Acceptor
   6: {
   7:   public void each(Object obj);
   8: }
   9:  
  10: public class Collection
  11: {
  12:   public static void each(List list, Acceptor acc)
  13:   {